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Old 01-16-2013, 09:42 PM   #11 (permalink)
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While not all cats are affected the same way, litterbox issues are a significant risk of the declawing procedure. The process can leave their feet sensitive and walking on litter can be painful. Listed below are some studies that support this information. From personal experience I can tell you that our local shelter keeps statistics and of the cats given up for litterbox issues, over 80% were declawed.

At this point you may want to try providing a soft litterbox lining instead of litter...I'm thinking of something like a puppy pee pad. Although by now it may be a habit that is impossible to break.

  • Yeon, et al., (JAVMA 2001) found that 33% of cats suffer at least one behavioral problem after declaw or tendonectomy surgery. The study showed that 17.9% of cats had an increase in biting frequency or intensity and that 15.4% would not use a litter box.
  • Bennett, et al., examining 25 declawed cats, reported that declawed cats were 18.5% more likely than non-declawed cat to bite and 15.6% more likely to avoid the litter box.
  • Morgan and Houpt found that the 24 declawed cats in their internet survey had a 40% higher incidence of house soiling than non-declawed cats.
  • Borchelt and Voith, looking only at aggressive behavior in a retrospective survey of pet owners, found declawed cats bit family members more often than did non-declawed cats.
  • Gaynor (in North American Veterinary Clinics, April 2005) described cats suffering from a chronic pain syndrome as a result of declawing that is associated with increased biting.
  • In a retrospective phone survey, Patronek found that among 218 cats relinquished to a shelter, 52.4% of declawed cats versus 29.1% of non-declawed cats were reported to have inappropriate elimination.
  • Landsberg reported that about 5% of cats developed either biting or litter box avoidance problems after declaw surgery. These figures were obtained by means of a written retrospective owner satisfaction questionnaire, approximately half of which were distributed by veterinarians other than the investigator.
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Old 01-16-2013, 10:15 PM   #12 (permalink)
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They did not do X-rays. No he does not cry in pain when he goes.
Could it have anything to do with the fact his whole family are feral & he loved like that for the first 2 weeks of his life?
That's for the studies about declaw, I am just not a believer in that.
I have owned cats all my life and they have all been declawed and I have never had a problem. Same goes for my aunt, but I do thank you for trying to help.

Any other ideas or what it could be or what I can try?



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Old 01-16-2013, 10:30 PM   #13 (permalink)
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You can deny the facts all you want, but it sounds like the odds just finally caught up with you.

I made a suggestion that you might want to try.
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Old 01-16-2013, 10:41 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Baranovic View Post
That's for the studies about declaw, I am just not a believer in that.
I have owned cats all my life and they have all been declawed and I have never had a problem. Same goes for my aunt, but I do thank you for trying to help.
How can you not believe it? It's sort of like saying you don't believe in science or something, the results speak for themselves. Owning several cats that are declawed is not a large enough percentage of declawed cats, just because you have been lucky does not mean that serious consequences do not exist. You may be facing them right now, whether you choose to believe it or not.

The practice is banned in most forward thinking countries for its barbaric nature; in fact, just about anywhere but North America. Britian and most other European countries, Australia, New Zealand, France, Germany, Scotland, Japan, etc.

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Originally Posted by Baranovic View Post
Any other ideas or what it could be or what I can try?
Outside of locking your cat 24/7 in one room, or a cage, without carpeting, and forcing him to use a litter box? Probably there aren't any other options. Know when he's more likely to use it, praise him when you catch him using it, give him treats, and let him out under supervision for a short time. Eventually he may become trained that the litter box is where to go.

Maybe try ripped rags if he is so partial to carpet, and either tear out your current rugs or entirely soak them in enzyme cleaner.

I know what it's like, cat pee destroys not only the carpet, but if you don't have a good inlay (luckily we did) it will soak into the concrete below as well, and it will soak into the walls as well, causing parts of the walls to need to be replaced, and it will warp doors, and wreck clothing, and only smell worse the longer it goes on for and will permeate into everything... we have a cat that's done it for 17 years.

Now that we keep him in one room, and are repairing the damages he did to the old place (extensive and costly), he only pees against one small wall in that room, which we line with newspaper. If left to wander the house he'll spray, and when he's outdoors he sprays as well. Looking back, as much as we love him, it really destroyed the better part of 15 years (the last 2 he hasn't had free roam) as far as socializing goes, or even as far as enjoying living in our own house goes. You know where's something wrong when you think "I'd rather not go back home" ... and need to shut bedrooms doors to prevent your cat from wrecking a single decent room of your house. Looking back on the years now, I know I'd never do it again; there's other cats out there that need homes and can be just as sweet and loving. As heartbreaking as it would have been to surrender him, I don't think anyone should live like that. I feel bad for your husband if he's not an animal person, he must really love you to put up with this.
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Last edited by Carmel; 01-16-2013 at 10:44 PM.
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Old 01-16-2013, 11:20 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by doodlebug View Post
While not all cats are affected the same way, litterbox issues are a significant risk of the declawing procedure. The process can leave their feet sensitive and walking on litter can be painful. Listed below are some studies that support this information. From personal experience I can tell you that our local shelter keeps statistics and of the cats given up for litterbox issues, over 80% were declawed.

At this point you may want to try providing a soft litterbox lining instead of litter...I'm thinking of something like a puppy pee pad. Although by now it may be a habit that is impossible to break.

  • Yeon, et al., (JAVMA 2001) found that 33% of cats suffer at least one behavioral problem after declaw or tendonectomy surgery. The study showed that 17.9% of cats had an increase in biting frequency or intensity and that 15.4% would not use a litter box.
  • Bennett, et al., examining 25 declawed cats, reported that declawed cats were 18.5% more likely than non-declawed cat to bite and 15.6% more likely to avoid the litter box.
  • Morgan and Houpt found that the 24 declawed cats in their internet survey had a 40% higher incidence of house soiling than non-declawed cats.
  • Borchelt and Voith, looking only at aggressive behavior in a retrospective survey of pet owners, found declawed cats bit family members more often than did non-declawed cats.
  • Gaynor (in North American Veterinary Clinics, April 2005) described cats suffering from a chronic pain syndrome as a result of declawing that is associated with increased biting.
  • In a retrospective phone survey, Patronek found that among 218 cats relinquished to a shelter, 52.4% of declawed cats versus 29.1% of non-declawed cats were reported to have inappropriate elimination.
  • Landsberg reported that about 5% of cats developed either biting or litter box avoidance problems after declaw surgery. These figures were obtained by means of a written retrospective owner satisfaction questionnaire, approximately half of which were distributed by veterinarians other than the investigator.
Sounds like a HUGE litter box problem. And the declawing procedure is likely to be the culprit. I don't think that the first 2 weeks of 'living like a feral' would have any impact on what he is doing at 2 years of age, he didn't even have his eyes open at that point! Ditching the litter would be the first step, or try yesterday's news, might be a little better on their paws.
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Old 01-17-2013, 07:14 AM   #16 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Carmel View Post
How can you not believe it? It's sort of like saying you don't believe in science or something, the results speak for themselves. Owning several cats that are declawed is not a large enough percentage of declawed cats, just because you have been lucky does not mean that serious consequences do not exist. You may be facing them right now, whether you choose to believe it or not.




I know what it's like, cat pee destroys not only the carpet, but if you don't have a good inlay (luckily we did) it will soak into the concrete below as well, and it will soak into the walls as well, causing parts of the walls to need to be replaced, and it will warp doors, and wreck clothing, and only smell worse the longer it goes on for and will permeate into everything... we have a cat that's done it for 17 years.

Now that we keep him in one room, and are repairing the damages he did to the old place (extensive and costly), he only pees against one small wall in that room, which we line with newspaper. If left to wander the house he'll spray, and when he's outdoors he sprays as well. Looking back, as much as we love him, it really destroyed the better part of 15 years (the last 2 he hasn't had free roam) as far as socializing goes, or even as far as enjoying living in our own house goes. You know where's something wrong when you think "I'd rather not go back home" ... and need to shut bedrooms doors to prevent your cat from wrecking a single decent room of your house. Looking back on the years now, I know I'd never do it again; there's other cats out there that need homes and can be just as sweet and loving. As heartbreaking as it would have been to surrender him, I don't think anyone should live like that. I feel bad for your husband if he's not an animal person, he must really love you to put up with this.
Carmel, that is ONE lucky cat you have! I could not have dealt with that for one month let alone 17 years! You must have the patience of Job.

I have (now) 5 declawed cats. I adopt them old and look for cats that have already been declawed. I won't do it, but others will. ALL of our 10 cats we have had over the past 20 years, have been declawed - every single one and we have never had issues because of that. They all use the same scoopable litter. I would respectfully disagree that lasting psychological damages occur because of the declawing. I will agree it is barbaric, but does not cause lasting psychological harm, IMHO.

I think this is more a mental issue with the cat - perhaps becuase of feral roots, not a physical issue.
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Old 01-17-2013, 08:22 AM   #17 (permalink)
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This cat began avoiding the litter box because the litter hurts his paws. He blames the litter for his pain and he seeks out soft surfaces to eliminate on, because his feet hurt.

In addition constant pain can cause stress that can inflame the bladder and urinary tract. This also causes pain, which the cat again, blames on the litter box.

In addition, because he avoids the litter box, his stool may become slightly impacted. This causes a lot of discomfort when pooping. Again, the litter box is blamed so he seeks soft surfaces such as the carpet, to eliminate on.

I wonder what you are feeding your cats. If they are eating kibble, that is probably half the problem.

Put your cats on a high quality wet diet. This will help. Give your little boy who is having so much pain a krill oil supplement every day. Krill oil is an anti-inflammatory. This will help with any urinary tract inflammation and might help his painful little cut off toes too.

It will also help with his bowel movements.

As was also suggested, put puppy pads in the litter box instead of litter, since he likes soft surfaces. Get a new liter box, very open with a lot of surface area, low sided, put puppy pads in it, and when he poops or pees on the carpet, clean it up and put the residue in his puppy pad box so he knows what it's for. One of those long flat under the bed blanket storage totes would be perfect.

People seem to think that cats don't feel pain and that is why it is okay to cut off their toes. I'll never understand that attitude. Cats feel pain just as much as any other mammal.

Last edited by lovetimesfour; 01-17-2013 at 08:24 AM.
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Old 01-17-2013, 08:33 AM   #18 (permalink)
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Is he neutered?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcia View Post
ALL of our 10 cats we have had over the past 20 years, have been declawed - every single one and we have never had issues because of that. They all use the same scoopable litter. I would respectfully disagree that lasting psychological damages occur because of the declawing. I will agree it is barbaric, but does not cause lasting psychological harm, IMHO.

I think this is more a mental issue with the cat - perhaps becuase of feral roots, not a physical issue.
Litterbox avoidance after declawing is not a psychological issue, it's physical. Their feet hurt, so they won't go in.

I would not expect the declawed cats that you've adopted to be representative of the overall declawed cat population. Any older declawed cats coming into a shelter with litterbox issues are likely euthanized. Otherwise the shelter is obligated to disclose the information...would you have chosen a cat that had a history of litterbox issues? If it was a no kill shelter, they would probably not have even taken in a cat that is likely to be unadoptable. Basically, when you adopt a declawed cat from a shelter it's been pre-screened.

The fact are facts, they are not made up, they are not anecdotal. Just because a small population is not representative of issue doesn't mean the problem doesn't exist. That's why statistical data is based on large numbers.

If the feral background of the cat has any impact on elimination behavior it is likely to make it more fastidious than any domestically born kitten...waste smells draw predators, so burying it is a matter of survival. Cats in the wild don't just eliminate anywhere nilly-willy. They find places to bury it, far away from their home base unless they are marking territory. Assuming this cat was neutered before maturity, this doesn't sound like marking.
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Old 01-17-2013, 10:13 AM   #19 (permalink)
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I am not going to debate the issue about declawing or not declawing. It is what it is at this point. I simply wanted some help as far as him not going in the box.
Let's just agree to disagree on that issue.




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Old 01-17-2013, 10:14 AM   #20 (permalink)
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