Cat Age Test - Cat Forum : Cat Discussion Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old 04-22-2005, 08:06 PM Thread Starter
Banned
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 12,663
Cat Age Test

Baby's CatAge is 23.7!

That's 12.5 years younger than the average CatAge for Baby's breed.

CatAge is the biological age of your cat, measured in people years.

Your cat is lucky to have such a good caretaker. You can make your cat even younger by following recommendations from your CatAge Results.

The highlights of Baby's results are below. For detailed results, click Continue or use the left menu.

Baby's CatAge was calculated by assessing over 40 individual health factors, from weight and nutrition to exercise, behavior, and safety. Here are the highlights of your results:

Cat Age Benefits

Ideal weight
Spayed
Regular vet checkups
Vaccinations
Heartworm and/or fleas and ticks prevention
Nonsmoking home
No general health conditions
No feline disease
No infections
No parasitic conditions
Good food quantity control
Cat Age costs
Outside environment

General Health
Weight
Keeping your cat at an ideal weight can protect his or her health. Research shows that an estimated 35-40% of cats are obese, significantly increasing their risk for developing diabetes, lameness, non-allergic skin conditions, and other health conditions.

Great news! Your cat is likely an ideal weight for an optimal CatAge. Being able to feel your cat’s ribs, and having a noticeable waistline are good, healthy signs. On the above scale, your cat ranks a 5.

Neutering and Spaying
Neutering or spaying your cat has many health benefits: it lowers the risk of certain cancers, reduces the chance of certain illnesses, and reduces certain behavioral issues that may, unfortunately, result in euthanasia.

Spaying your cat was a great decision. Spaying minimizes the risk of breast cancer and uterine infections, as well as prevents unwanted pregnancies.

Dental Hygiene
Periodontal disease, caused by plaque buildup, can ultimately affect various organs of the body and the nervous system if left untreated. Cats over the age of five become more susceptible to oral diseases, so it is important to keep your pet’s teeth and gums clean with annual dental visits and regular home dental care.

Giving dental treats and brushing your cat’s teeth are great ways to keep your cat’s oral hygiene in top shape! Keep up this healthy habit. Maintaining your cat’s oral health helps keep her healthy and happy.

Your cat’s really bad breath could be caused by excess plaque and calculus deposits on the teeth. Without treatment, this could lead to painful gum and bone infections. Regular visits to the dentist, in addition to brushing and/or supplying dental treats, may help eliminate this problem.

Your cat’s somewhat yellow teeth are not cause for alarm, but you should consider a home dental care program and annual dental exams if you haven’t already. Dental treats and brushing can help maintain healthy, white teeth between cleanings.

Prevention
Checkups
Annual vet visits are an important part of every cat’s life. The visit gives the veterinarian a chance to evaluate your cat’s health and detect problems before they turn into serious illnesses.

Way to go! You are taking great care of your kitty by scheduling regular veterinary checkups. These exams make her CatAge younger!

Vaccinations
To keep your cat healthy for years to come, your veterinarian may recommend a series of vaccinations. If possible, it’s best to begin these vaccinations in kittens as early as 6 to 8 weeks of age.

All vaccination programs are not the same for all cats. Ask your cat’s vet for a schedule specific to your cat's health care needs. This also will help remind you when it's time to vaccinate.

You’re taking great care of Baby by having her vaccinated. Remember to ask your vet if revaccination is necessary and whether your cat has received all the necessary shots.

Good job. You’re taking steps to prevent heartworm and/or fleas and ticks, which helps make your cat younger.

Feline Disease
The healthier cats are, the lower their risk of disease. A balanced diet, regular exercise, weight management, and lots of love are all important defenses against illness and disease.

Baby’s CatAge is younger because she lives in a smoke-free environment. Recent studies show that cats who are exposed to secondhand smoke have a greater risk of developing certain cancers than cats who live in smoke-free environments.

Food and Nutrition
Food Quality
Different cats have different nutritional needs. Deciding which type of food and how much is best for your cat can be confusing. Use the following steps to help shape your cat’s menu—and her physique!

Food Quantity
Recent statistics show that approximately 35-40% of cats are overweight or obese. Following cat food package instructions and using a measured daily amount of food are the best ways to control food quantity and reduce the risk of obesity in your cat.

What a good caretaker you are! You’re taking the right measures to keep your cat’s daily food quantity in control.

Feeding Times
Every cat’s dietary needs are different. Determining how much food to feed your cat for optimal health depends upon your cat’s metabolism and activity level, as well as the nutrient density of the food. Even cats of the same age, size, and activity levels may not eat the same, due to differences in metabolism rates.

Great job feeding your cat throughout the day! Cats like to eat occasionally throughout the day, and should have frequent access to food and water. Be sure to leave her bowl out for several hours each day, and provide fresh water at all times.

Feeding Duties
It is important to know how much food your cat eats throughout the day. If you live with more than one person, assign regular feeding duties to keep your cat from eating too much or too often.

More than one person is feeding your cat, so it is important to create a schedule for everyone so that you can regulate the times and amounts of food your cat receives. Too much food or too many treats may cause your kitty to become overweight. In order to cut down on confusion and overeating, you may want to restrict feeding duties to one particular person.

Exercise and Activity
Although indoor cats tend to live long, healthy lives, these sedentary critters are at an increased risk of obesity and other serious health conditions. Whether your cat is an indoor, outdoor, or an indoor-outdoor cat, encouraging exercise can help keep your pet physically fit and mentally healthy by burning calories, increasing muscle mass, and strengthening cardiovascular health.

Safety
Cats are curious animals. However, this heightened curiosity can get them into trouble. Keeping your cat’s environment safe at all times will help make your pet’s CatAge younger and ensure a longer, happier life.

Your cat may enjoy being outdoors, but by allowing her to go outside unsupervised, her CatAge is older. Cats who roam freely outside are at greater risk for a shortened life span, living an average of only 5 years. Keeping your cat safely confined indoors can increase her odds of living up to 15 years or more. Cats kept indoors reduce their risk of attack, are less likely to contract diseases or parasites, and are less likely to require emergency treatment.

Congratulations for keeping your kitty safe in your automobile! Cat carriers are the safest way to transport your cat in all types of vehicles. Protecting your cat from potential accidents and/or injury on the road makes her CatAge younger.

Behavior
The way your cat acts when meeting new people or cats can indicate if she has behavioral issues. Inappropriate aggression (biting, attacking humans and/or other animals), inappropriate elimination, and other behavior problems are often the reason why people give up their cats to shelters.

You indicated that your cat hides or shies away from people. You can teach her how to be a more social animal. Try spending more time petting or playing with your cat. Cats desire attention and in time, will learn to enjoy human contact.

Strong Relationships
Owning a cat can be a wonderful experience. Cats can be companions and playmates. A healthy and happy cat can be a wonderful addition to any family.

http://www.catage.com/
DesnBaby is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old 04-22-2005, 08:32 PM
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 678
Elliott's CatAge is 6.8!
That's 4.9 years younger than the average CatAge for Elliott's breed.


They said she "may be lacking proper nutrition". I guess because we make her food they count that as a negative. I think her food is probably better than any store bought food. Although Purina does have something to do w/ this site, so maybe they are just trying to guilt me into buying their food.

Food and Nutrition

Food Quality
Different cats have different nutritional needs. Deciding which type of food and how much is best for your cat can be confusing. Use the following steps to help shape your cat’s menu—and her physique!

Make sure your homemade cat food is low in fat. Homemade cat food diets run the risk of containing too much fat for most cats’ needs. Diets high in fat could increase your cat’s risk of obesity and make her CatAge older.
Adrienne is offline  
post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old 04-22-2005, 09:40 PM
Cool Cat
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Peterborough, Ontario
Posts: 1,333
Send a message via MSN to vanillasugar
Nya's CatAge is 26.7!

That's 6.9 years younger than the average CatAge for Nya's breed.

Cat Age Benifits:
Spayed
Regular vet checkups
Vaccinations
Heartworm and/or fleas and ticks prevention
Nonsmoking home
No feline disease
No infections
No parasitic conditions
Good food quantity control
Indoor environment

Cat age Costs:
Somewhat underweight
General health conditions

General Health
Weight
Your cat might be somewhat underweight, so her CatAge is slightly older. You should be able to feel your cat’s ribs, as well as see a noticeable waistline, but not necessarily see the ribs clearly. On the above scale, your cat ranks a 3. Take your cat to the vet to confirm whether she is indeed underweight and to rule out any underlying illnesses.

Neutering and Spaying
Spaying your cat was a great decision. Spaying minimizes the risk of breast cancer and uterine infections, as well as prevents unwanted pregnancies.

Dental Hygiene
Giving teeth-cleaning treats is a good way to keep your cat’s oral hygiene in top shape! Keep it up.
Your cat’s really bad breath could be caused by excess plaque and calculus deposits on the teeth. Without treatment, this could lead to painful gum and bone infections. Regular visits to the dentist, in addition to brushing and/or supplying dental treats, may help eliminate this problem.
Your cat’s somewhat yellow teeth are not cause for alarm, but you should consider a home dental care program and annual dental exams if you haven’t already. Dental treats and brushing can help maintain healthy, white teeth between cleanings.

Prevention
Checkups
Way to go! You are taking great care of your kitty by scheduling regular veterinary checkups. These exams make her CatAge younger!

Vaccinations
You’re taking great care of Nya by having her vaccinated. Remember to ask your vet if revaccination is necessary and whether your cat has received all the necessary shots.
Good job. You’re taking steps to prevent heartworm and/or fleas and ticks, which helps make your cat younger.

Feline Disease
Nya’s CatAge is younger because she lives in a smoke-free environment. Recent studies show that cats who are exposed to secondhand smoke have a greater risk of developing certain cancers than cats who live in smoke-free environments.

Food and Nutrition
Food Quality
What a good caretaker you are! You’re taking the right measures to keep your cat’s daily food quantity in control.

Feeding Times
Great job feeding your cat throughout the day! Cats like to eat occasionally throughout the day, and should have frequent access to food and water. Be sure to leave her bowl out for several hours each day, and provide fresh water at all times.

Feeding Duties
Only one person is feeding your cat, so you probably have good control over your cat’s daily caloric intake. This is important for keeping your cat at a healthy weight.

Safety
Keeping your cat indoors is making her CatAge younger. Indoor cats who are always safely confined can live up to 15 years or more, whereas cats who roam freely outside are at an increased risk for a shortened life span, living an average of only 5 years. Cats kept indoors reduce their risk of attack, are less likely to contract diseases or parasites, and are less likely to require emergency treatment.
Congratulations for keeping your kitty safe in your automobile! Cat carriers are the safest way to transport your cat in all types of vehicles. Protecting your cat from potential accidents and/or injury on the road makes her CatAge younger.

Behavior
It’s wonderful that your cat is so social! Your kitty purrs, plays, and enjoys being social with you, which indicates that she is very happy and loved.
Don’t reward begging or excessive meowing with treats or table scraps. Try redirecting this energy by playing with or petting your cat.

WOW that was long to copy!

Can I just say that I LOVED this part:
Super premium (e.g., Pro Plan, ONE, Hill's
Science Diet, lams, Eukanuba)
Premium (e.g., Cat Chow, Friskies, Kitten
Chow, Flint River Ranch, Meow Mix, Nutro
Natural Choice)

Since when are these foods "premium"? Let alone SUPER-premium??! lol

<--Julia

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
vanillasugar is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old 04-22-2005, 11:07 PM
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 678
Quote:
Originally Posted by vanillasugar
Can I just say that I LOVED this part:
Super premium (e.g., Pro Plan, ONE, Hill's
Science Diet, lams, Eukanuba)
Premium (e.g., Cat Chow, Friskies, Kitten
Chow, Flint River Ranch, Meow Mix, Nutro
Natural Choice)

Since when are these foods "premium"? Let alone SUPER-premium??! lol
I thought that was funny too. When I read that I thought "I don't buy any of that junk."
Adrienne is offline  
post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old 04-22-2005, 11:20 PM
Premier Cat
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Simpsonville, SC
Posts: 3,588
Send a message via AIM to OsnobunnieO
I laughed at that part too... and didn't agree with this one either

Quote:
Cats like to eat occasionally throughout the day, and should have frequent access to food and water. Be sure to leave her bowl out for several hours each day, and provide fresh water at all times.
I didn't feel like going through the whole thing... but it seems fun

Jessie

"There is no snooze button on a cat who wants breakfast."
OsnobunnieO is offline  
post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old 04-23-2005, 12:23 AM
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 284
Esprit's CatAge is 13.6!

That's 8.5 years younger than the average CatAge for Esprit's breed.

I kinda averaged Esprit and the other two though they weigh a bit more so the age would be a bit higher!

I laughed at the food thing too... I think we get bonus points for knowing REAL premium foods! I had few other issues with the quiz as well... my cats may run and hide and be impossible to brush their teeth... but hey they ARE feral!! Good fun though!
Feral Fan is offline  
post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old 04-23-2005, 12:33 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: southern Maine
Posts: 2,586
Send a message via AIM to spacemonkey Send a message via Yahoo to spacemonkey
Scully is 10.6 (4.2 years younger than average), Stephanie and Miko are both 5.8 (2.3 years younger than average), and Beeper is...

125 (36.6 years older than average )


Her "costs" are:

Underweight (we're working on that...)

Poor Feeding Practices (she's underweight! we feed her as much as she'll eat )

General Health Conditions (arthritis)

Not Enough Excercise (did I not say she was arthritic?)

Aggressive Behavior (apparently, not getting along with the other cats is shortening her lifespan)

Outside Environment

Feline Disease (I don't know where they got that from )

Possible Oral Disease (We value our fingers, so brushing her teeth is out of the question. And she's just too old to risk anesthesia for teeth cleaning. Treats will have to do...)


The other cats didn't have any costs, so I'm not entirely a pathetic cat owner
spacemonkey is offline  
post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old 04-23-2005, 02:16 AM
Jr. Cat
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Utah, USA
Posts: 46
Owners and their pets...

My sister always says "You know what they say about pets and their owners..." (which means they're usually a lot alike)
Most tests for me are off-kilter, because of my bad heart... I'm underweight, my blood pressure is low (but not low enough for medicine to raise it), my doctor actually told me to eat more junk food to try to gain weight, and I have severe scoliosis and too much activity is painful.

Some of these things weren't quite right for Paizly. The only reason she doesn't get lots of excersize and play, is that it's kinda hard to romp around with only two good legs! Granted, she can scoot around (basically pulls herself along with her front feet) rather fast, if she really wants to - usually when she's running to hide LOL
And that's also why I think she does hide, is she knows she's lame and figures she's more vulnerable to 'predators'. So that kinda went in the behavioral section. Otherwise, she's a nice kitty!

Anyhoo...she was 25 years old, about 3 years younger than most.

~~~
I may be crazy, but it's kept me from goin' insane...
Vivid-Dawn is offline  
post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old 04-23-2005, 02:57 AM
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 2,232
For Gaylord, he is 25- 4.6 years younger than average...but I think he would have even been younger except that I marked that he hisses...because he does, on occaission, at Iva...and in my results, he got knocked for "aggressive behavior". Which is SO not Gaylord!!

Ashley got 51..which is 0.5 years older than average. Mostly because she is a it chubby and doesn't excercise...and also because I said she has bad breath.

Ivan got 19.8, which is 3.2 years younger.....he got docked for bad behavior.
Ianthe is offline  
post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old 04-23-2005, 04:10 AM
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 1,661
Quote:
They said she "may be lacking proper nutrition". I guess because we make her food they count that as a negative. I think her food is probably better than any store bought food. Although Purina does have something to do w/ this site, so maybe they are just trying to guilt me into buying their food.
I did DogAge, and got similar results...thats what I dislike about these sites - unless you are feeding commercial, using chemicals, vaccinating, etc, you are a bad mum. They don't take into account the fact that some people do not approve of commercial diets, flea chemicals & vaccinations, and these people can still be responsible cat/dog owners!
emma_pen is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Cat Forum : Cat Discussion Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome