Thinking about gettin kitten/cat - Cat Forum : Cat Discussion Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-17-2005, 07:00 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 25
Thinking about gettin kitten/cat

Hi, I'm thinkin about gettin a cat/kitten. I was wanting a kitten, but from reading many posts it seems like i might be better off with a cat. I am in college and I live in a 430 ft2 apartment and was wondering if that is enough space for a cat. I currently have a 55 gallon aquarium at my place, but i was wanting something that i can interact with and something that will show love in return. If i were to get a cat, i would adopt. here are just a few quesions that i have:

1-Since i live in such a small space, will odor be bad? I don't want to come home to a smelly place even when i keep up with my dail maintenence.
2- I DO leave to go home on occasion. (maybe once every 1.5-2.5 months) would the cat be okay by itself for 1-2 days?
3- I am really worried about the odor of a cat to begin with, will it smell up my place since it is so small?
4- Should I look for a cat or kitten? I volunteer there and they have kittens and cats. I do have a lot of time on my hands as well. BUT i have this couch that I LOVE and don't want it to get reuined.

OK, those are just a few questions that i could think of...if i have more i will post later.

Thanks all,
Xander
Xandernfs is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-17-2005, 07:52 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 12,638
Hi Xander, welcome to the forum. You're doing the right thing by doing your research first.

1,3 - healthy cats don't smell at all. They keep themselves very clean. The only odor comes from a dirty litterbox. That's your responsibility to keep clean. If you keep it clean, and the cat buries its waste, then there is only a momentary odor that rapidly dissipates. I don't think this will be a problem.

2 - a cat can be left alone for a couple days with adequate food and water. Perhaps an automatic feeder and a water fountain would work best. In my opinion, for longer times you'll want somebody to come in a look after the cat - check food and water and clean the litter and give the cat some company. Or you can board the cat.

4 - for a first-time cat, I think a mature adult cat is an excellent idea, especially in a small area. Kittens are very active and they're still learning. Your workload is higher and the chance of accidents is higher. You can protect your furnishings in various ways, such as giving the cat something else to scratch. Because cats do need to scratch. Most people find solutions to these problems and don't have to give up their belongings for a cat.

Good luck!! You sound like a person who will make an excellent companion for a cat!!
coaster is offline  
post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-17-2005, 09:55 PM
Premier Cat
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 4,053
I agree with Tim. Just be sure you're ready for a long term commitment. As far as scratching goes you may need to do a little training. I used to keep a spray bottle filled with water available and if they started for the couch they'd get a spritz. It worked pretty quickly and they don't even tink about it anymore. But as Tim said, they do need something to scratch on, a scrating post or my guys love a piece of remnant carpet. I know being in school you're probably on a budget so a little tip: most carpet stores will just give you samples about the size of a floor mat. You can either just put it on the floor or tack it to a wall or door. Perr-fect!

Victoria
nanook is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-18-2005, 01:45 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 25
so i am assuming that declawing is not what i am looking for? Why is declawing so bad?
Xandernfs is offline  
post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-18-2005, 03:45 AM
Cat Addict
 
Nell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,522
I think its wonderful that you're thinking about adopting a cat. I agree that an adult cat would probably be the best choice. I also think that 450 sq ft is plenty of space for one adult cat, and you should have any problems with smell as long as you keep the litter box clean.

There is a lot of controversy on the subject of declawing, and unfourtunatly most people don't know what it actually involves. The surgery is actually an amputation the first joint of each of a cat's toes. It can cause a lot of pain and sometimes leads to even more behavioral (and health) problems than it solves. There are far better alternatives to declawing that more people should seriously consider before declawing their cats.

Here is an article that will tell you more about declawing:
Declawing: A Rational Look

If your furniture really is a big concern for you, then maybe you could consider adopting a cat that is already declawed?
Nell is offline  
post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-18-2005, 08:56 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 12,638
There are plenty of cats already declawed that come up for adoption. But, I agree, don't declaw a cat that still has its claws.
coaster is offline  
post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-18-2005, 09:29 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 25
So why would a kitten be outta the question? Would I just have better luck with an adult cat or a young adult cat?
Xandernfs is offline  
post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-18-2005, 11:12 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 12,638
Not out of the question, I just recommended what I thought was best for your situation. A kitten or young adult is full of energy, very active and mischievious, and takes a lot of supervision.
coaster is offline  
post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-18-2005, 12:36 PM
Cat Addict
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Fayetteville, Arkansas
Posts: 1,494
Right, and it's best not to leave a kitten alone for a few days. Who knows what kind of trouble they will get into!
Hippyhart is offline  
post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-18-2005, 12:44 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 25
Thanks for all of the replies.....are there any articles that you all could point me to? What other precautions should i take/look out for? What kinda litter boxes are good? What is the best litter? How many toys should i have? Ect. . . . . .
Xandernfs is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Cat Forum : Cat Discussion Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome