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post #1 of 7 (permalink) Old 10-08-2015, 06:03 PM Thread Starter
tgw
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Teeth Health

I just brought my 4 year old DSH home after a teeth cleaning as recommended by her vet. Previously Emily was having trouble eating dry food as well as wet food with chunks. She was able to eat pate without too much problem. When I brought her to the vet to check on this issue, the vet said she found some inflammation around the gums and recommended the teeth cleaning.

Her teeth cleaning went well and while she did have come plaque, no sign of inflammation was found (this is about ten days after the first visit). I am glad that no issues were found (I had x rays taken as well) and now Emily's teeth are clean.

Can I assume that in another four years, if Emily had her teeth cleaned again, we would find the same amount of plaque build up on her teeth? I would like opinions on how often such cleaning should be done. This is a very invasive procedure for the cat.

I am also curious regarding Emily's earlier problem with chewing. Have others had similar experience with their cats, that cleared up without having to resort to cleaning?
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post #2 of 7 (permalink) Old 10-08-2015, 06:05 PM
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Hmmmmm. I haven't heard of troubling eating being cured simply by having teeth cleaned, usually there are bad teeth or more serious problems than this. Hopefully, others will chime in with experience in this field.

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post #3 of 7 (permalink) Old 10-08-2015, 09:23 PM Thread Starter
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I think the vet could not see anything unusual in the mouth when I first brought her in and deduced it might be because of plaque build up. I am glad nothing serious was found with the x rays and cleaning. I did not want to do nothing and later find that there was a problem and it could have been prevented from becoming worse had I got the x rays and cleaning.

Emily did have a chewing problem with her food and was flicking her head as if to dislodge something from her mouth. Maybe the problem would have gone away on its own, but I did not want to take that chance and have Emily in discomfort in the meantime.
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post #4 of 7 (permalink) Old 10-08-2015, 09:46 PM
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I have been a part-time receptionist/veterinary assistant for three years so I have some knowledge but by no means am I an expert!

I know people hate this answer, but it honestly depends on each cat. Genetics play a part which most people don't know. (I have seen cats who need a dental every year and another cat who didn't get his first dental until he was twenty years old!)

Another factor is diet. I personally think the veterinary recommend foods are not the best nutritionally but they really do help with oral care. Half of my cats' diet is Hills T/D dental diet and the other half is a variety of wet food (Since hydration and nutrition is important). I also give Wysong Denta Powder. I avoid the products you can add to their water since I don't full trust them and my cats stopped drinking their water. Unfortunately, a lot of these products are expensive but truly seem to help.

Brushing their teeth is ideal for fantastic oral care and could put off a dental or even eliminate the need for another one! But, I haven't met a cat yet that will allow that peacefully. It's not worth the stress in my opinion.

So honestly, it's hard to say. It could be next year, it could be four years or maybe more!

It's great that your veterinary clinic has a dental radiograph machine! This expensive machine is not in every clinic and is so much better at detecting level of oral disease than just looking around the mouth.

Also, it's good you got a cleaning before it got worse. If you had left it, it can lead to teeth extractions which are painful, difficult/riskier and expensive! (I had a clients pay over $2,000 because ALL their cat's teeth needed to be extracted and it's especially more complicated with older cats)

I hope this helps!
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post #5 of 7 (permalink) Old 10-08-2015, 10:15 PM
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My two 9 year old Persians have needed cleaning at the vets numerous times and one of them had to have a tooth extracted. I would know they had problems because they would stop eating their dry food and only slurp up the gravy in their wet food. My 10 year old Seal Point Birman suddenly started to eat very delicately as if her teeth were bothering her. I took her to the vet who could only see very slight inflammation and said she doesn't need a clean but to give her raw meat to chew on and it would fix the problem. Which it did within a week. Now I give my cats a few strips/chunks of raw human grade meat to chew on before I feed them their dinner and that seems to have kept teeth and gum problems at bay .. so far.
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post #6 of 7 (permalink) Old 10-08-2015, 10:48 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the input. Emily was not happy getting her teeth cleaned and not being able to eat after mid night the day before the procedure. I hope it is a long time before we have to do this again.
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post #7 of 7 (permalink) Old 10-14-2015, 11:47 AM
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As other said, it really depends on the cat. I have two siblings from the same litter, 5yo. One has very good teeth and very good gums, the other one had already all of teeth extracted due to horrible respective lesions and stomatitis. You never know. So whenever you suspect any oral problem, I would check it out. Resorptive lesions are often hard to detect by eye and require good luck into mouth of sedated cat. Been there.

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