Natural cure for UTI? (update) - Cat Forum : Cat Discussion Forums
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post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old 06-14-2005, 02:15 PM Thread Starter
 
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Natural cure for UTI? (update)

Tigger has been using the restroom in my mother's room - he sits in the litter box forever but never pees or anything... then goes into her room on the carpet and is able to do it. He is actually straining to go.

My father can't take him to the vet (he doesn't have the money to spare) - and neither can Brad and me since we are taking care of Momo's spay THIS week.

We are not sure if he does have a UTI - but it sounds like it to me so is there a way to naturally cure a UTI if that is what he has?
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post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old 06-14-2005, 02:27 PM
 
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uh oh Tigger sounds like he really needs to go to the vet. Can you work out a payment plan with the vet and pay later? You don't want him to end up blocked
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post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old 06-14-2005, 04:22 PM
 
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Yes, Tigger needs to go to the vet.
Please go here for help with the bill:
http://www.carecredit.com

There is a lot you can do with diet and nutritional treatment to treat and prevent urinary problems but before you begin, getting a diagnosis (to find out whether stones or crystals are involved for example) is absolutely essential.

The best overall protection/prevention is to feed wet food and to stay away from fish.

Please keep in mind that if a cat can't pass urine for 24 hours the consequences can be irreversible and fatal, so whoever is taking care of Tigger needs to keep a very close eye on this kitty.
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post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old 06-14-2005, 05:17 PM
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I suppose you could say that treating a UTI with diet is a "natural" treatment. But not something you self-prescribe.
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post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old 06-14-2005, 06:37 PM
 
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That's right. Once a cat has deveoped a urinary problem, the dietary approach must be tailored to the particular problem the cat is struggling with. And it must be done under veterinary supervision.

Prevention in a perfectly healthy cat is very easy however. Feeding a canned diet that will produce a slightly acidic pH which in turn will keep a cat healthy is a very good, safe thing we can all do.

Wonderful, detailed information about all this in this book:
Shawn Messonnier DVM: Natural Health Bible for Dogs and Cats

Go directly to page 85.
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post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old 06-14-2005, 07:04 PM
 
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When Korbel had a UTI, I called the vet to make an appointment. When I described the symptoms she was sure it was a UTI and just prescribed antibiotics without seeing her. Not always a good idea, but I was sure happy and I'd just spent $500+ on her a few weeks before for a dental.
Plus an 11yr old cat with NO history of crystals and she has diabetes, it was pretty clear it was a UTI. Obviously if things didn't improve within 24hrs I would have needed to take her in.

Jennifer
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post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old 06-14-2005, 07:40 PM
 
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Years ago one of our cats had several very painful episodes of bladder inflammation. I rushed him to the vet each and every time for fear he might be having a blockage. However, no bacteria, stones or crystals were ever found and eventually these awful episodes were traced to a serious food allergy. (The symptoms were always the same as the those of an ordinary UTI or when a cat has stones or crystals.)
When prescribing medication for him our vet told me that in our cat's case antibiotics would be absolutely useless and so she only prescribed a short course of anti-inflammatory medication, which was very helpful.

You were very lucky that antibiotics without an exam did the job for your kitty.
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post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old 06-14-2005, 08:24 PM Thread Starter
 
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If the diet thing will work... it might help if I try talking my father into getting Tigs a wet diet (AGAIN) - no matter what it takes. I think Fancy feast costs $10 for 24 cans right? That should last him 2 weeks and then it would only be around $20 to feed him for the month. I think he'll be able to swallow that number a lot better.

I just hope changing his food will help until something can be done.
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post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old 06-14-2005, 08:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meowmie
Years ago one of our cats had several very painful episodes of bladder inflammation. I rushed him to the vet each and every time for fear he might be having a blockage. However, no bacteria, stones or crystals were ever found and eventually these awful episodes were traced to a serious food allergy. (The symptoms were always the same as the those of an ordinary UTI or when a cat has stones or crystals.)
When prescribing medication for him our vet told me that in our cat's case antibiotics would be absolutely useless and so she only prescribed a short course of anti-inflammatory medication, which was very helpful.

You were very lucky that antibiotics without an exam did the job for your kitty.
Honestly, I wasn't very concerned. I really trust my vet. Korbel had just had some dental infections that led to higher bg than she was used to, diabetics get infections very easily. She had the textbook signs of a UTI, frequent attempts to urinate with very little output. Plus she is 11yrs old. Everything I've read and been told is that cats without a history of crystals don't suddenly develop them later in life.
She prescribed some pretty strong antibiotics. If she didn't show improvement by the end of the next day I was to bring her in for a urine test. I wouldn't have been able to get her in to be seen any quicker.
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post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old 06-14-2005, 08:55 PM
 
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I completely understand what you are saying.
The fact is, however, that under normal circumstances one can't go by the symptoms because they can mean anything. All these problems have the same exact symptoms, whether it's bacterial infection, stones or crystals, or allergy. Also under normal circumstances few cats really have a bacterial infection, their symptoms are usually the results of other underlying causes. So as a general rule, for people with healthy younger cats, starting with a complete urynalisis is always the best, safest way to go.
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