Cancer Screening? - Cat Forum : Cat Discussion Forums
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post #1 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-28-2005, 03:06 AM Thread Starter
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Cancer Screening?

Call me stupid, but I just found out a few days ago that cats can get cancer. My friends cat just died of cancer, and his cat's name was Patches, just like mine =(. His cat was also the same age as mine.

Getting to the point, is there any type of screening a veternarian can do for cancer? I don't want my cat to suddenly die one day of cancer. Apparently if your cat does have cancer, you can also get treatments?
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post #2 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-28-2005, 04:37 AM
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Any species can get cancer, and there are so many different kinds of cancer, there isn't just a screen you can do. Cancer is not just a singular disease, there are different kinds that can affect any or all of the body.
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post #3 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-28-2005, 07:56 AM
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Tumors would be one thing a vet looks for during the yearly check-up.
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post #4 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-28-2005, 10:08 AM
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But only visible woiuld be those on the outside of the body, unles a cat was ill and required diagnostic testuing. Cancer is a very broad word to describe a number of afflictions, tumours can grow on ANY organ or part of a body, internal & external. Cancer just means mutated cells of any kind. Leukaemia is cancer of white blood cells, Lymphoma is cancer of the Lymphatic System, and so on and so forth.
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post #5 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-28-2005, 10:30 AM
 
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Wesley, the intense poking (palpating) your vet does during each yearly office visit is in part a cancer screening. In addition to getting an idea about general health status, the internal organs and the digestive tract, your vet looks for enlarged lymph nodes, lumps and bumps anywhere on the body, anything to be concerned about in the oral cavity, the size and feel of the internal organs, and whether the digestive tract is thickened.
If your vet detects anything abnormal or worrisome, followup tests are recommended.
So the yearly exam is very, very important, don’t ever skip it.

Since cancer is far more common in cats and dogs than in people and what we can do to prevent cancer in our pets is rather limited, besides trying to keep the immune system strong, here are the few things we can do:

Every day when you groom and pet your cat, go over the whole body and all four legs with your hands and check for lumps and bumps. Cats can get ordinary warts and benign fatty tumors (lipomas), but a lot of other things can be suspected to be malignant. With some malignancies early detection is crucially important because with immediate removal the cancer can be considered cured and there is an excellent chance that there will never be a recurrence. So if you find anything, schedule an appointment immediately to have it looked at. If your vet can’t be entirely sure whether the growth is benign or malignant, have it removed without delay.

Keep a careful eye on your cat’s weight and if you see a weight loss of just ½ pound in a previously healthy cat, look into what’s going on. Besides cancer, several highly treatable health problems can be involved and, of course, the earlier you start treatment the better.

Spaying and neutering prevent several kinds of cancers.

Vaccinate only for what’s absolutely necessary. An indoor cat needs nothing more than distemper and rabies boosters.

Keep a careful eye on vaccination sites. If a swelling develops where your cat was just recently vaccinated, notify your vet and take precautions with future vaccinations.
If you find a lump at any time on a vaccination site, have your vet look at it immediately.

Since nasal vaccines can cause side effects and even nasal cancer later in life, as a precaution, stay away from nasal vaccines.

Keep your cat out of strong, direct sunlight. Repeated exposure to the sun can cause solar dermatitis, which can lead to skin cancer. (Surgery to treat this type of cancer is disfiguring and no guarantee that the cat will survive.)

Keep a careful eye on the stools. Loose stools for no apparent reason can be the sign of a long-term digestive problem, but also intestinal cancer.

Don’t let frequent vomiting go unchecked.

A sudden loss of appetite is always a serious warning sign. Among many, many things it can be the sign of a painful dental problem, but it can also be a sign of stomach cancer. Never let anorexia go unchecked after the first couple of days.

Keep the teeth clean and the gums in good condition. If necessary, schedule a professional cleaning every few years and have your vet do a scaling during routine office visits. Neglected oral health can lead to oral cancer in cats.
Try to check the inside of your cat’s mouth at least once a month. If you can (your cat allows you to), clean the teeth at home between appointments.

For some types of cancers surgery is the best treatment. For others there is treatment with medications and holistic treatment methods. Treatment depends on the particular type of cancer. As I said, early detection and immediate treatment are crucially important, they can make a lifesaving difference for a cat.
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post #6 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-23-2006, 04:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meowmie
Since cancer is far more common in cats and dogs than in people

and what we can do to prevent cancer in our pets is rather limited,

besides trying to keep the immune system strong, here are the few things we can do:

Every day when you groom and pet your cat, go over the whole body and all four legs with your hands and check for lumps and bumps.

Cats can get ordinary warts and benign fatty tumors (lipomas), but a lot of other things can be suspected to be malignant.

With some malignancies early detection is crucially important because

with immediate removal the cancer can be considered cured

and there is an excellent chance that there will never be a recurrence.

So if you find anything, schedule an appointment immediately to have it looked at.

If your vet can’t be entirely sure whether the growth is benign or malignant, have it removed without delay.

Keep a careful eye on your cat’s weight and if you see a weight loss of just ½ pound in a previously healthy cat, look into what’s going on.

Besides cancer, several highly treatable health problems can be involved and, of course, the earlier you start treatment the better.

Spaying and neutering prevent several kinds of cancers.

Vaccinate only for what’s absolutely necessary. An indoor cat needs nothing more than distemper and rabies boosters.

Keep a careful eye on vaccination sites.

If a swelling develops where your cat was just recently vaccinated, notify your vet and take precautions with future vaccinations.


If you find a lump at any time on a vaccination site, have your vet look at it immediately.

Since nasal vaccines can cause side effects and even nasal cancer later in life, as a precaution, stay away from nasal vaccines.

Keep your cat out of strong, direct sunlight. Repeated exposure to the sun can cause solar dermatitis,

which can lead to skin cancer. (Surgery to treat this type of cancer is disfiguring and no guarantee that the cat will survive.)

Keep a careful eye on the stools.

Loose stools for no apparent reason can be the sign of a long-term digestive problem, but also intestinal cancer.

Don’t let frequent vomiting go unchecked.

A sudden loss of appetite is always a serious warning sign. Among many, many things it can be the sign of a painful dental problem,

but it can also be a sign of stomach cancer. Never let anorexia go unchecked after the first couple of days.

Keep the teeth clean and the gums in good condition.

If necessary, schedule a professional cleaning every few years and have your vet do a scaling during routine office visits.

Neglected oral health can lead to oral cancer in cats.

Try to check the inside of your cat’s mouth at least once a month.

If you can (your cat allows you to), clean the teeth at home between appointments.

For some types of cancers surgery is the best treatment.

For others there is treatment with medications and holistic treatment methods.

Treatment depends on the particular type of cancer.

As I said, early detection and immediate treatment are crucially important,

they can make a lifesaving difference for a cat.
Found a lump on my older cats stomach,

doesn't seem to bother her,

and in doing a search found this very informitive post,

which I will make her an appointment immediately.

I held her up to the mirror and tried to see if there was any noticeable external signs,

but it all just looks like fur,

she is a short hair cat so I can't think that it is matting of the fur,

though I haven't completely excluded that because it is spring and she is shedding alot, (it's also 3:00am)

I'm glad it's not bothering her, like it is me,

feels like it's just a little bigger than a pea,

and it's on her belly inbetween her rear legs.
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post #7 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-23-2006, 12:09 PM
 
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Meowmie - do you have any more information on nasal vaccine reactions and cancer? One of the main reasons intranasal vaccines were developed was to avoid injection site reactions... I would love to have more information if you have any articles or links
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post #8 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-24-2006, 09:17 PM
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We got into the Vet today and she was of the opinion to remove the lump because of the characteristics of the attachment,

which I'll have to agree that removing it seems the best for her,

now, it may or may not be cancer,

and the lab test to find out are $118,

I need convincing that it is worth knowing,

because if it's removed and there are no other signs of tumors,

I'd rather have my money,

and see no reason why I have to know,

being it could not be cancer and she can still get cancer,

or it is cancer but now it's removed.

Thanks for the concern Meowmie, and all who may not have posted yet care,

She is scheduled to have it removed on Monday,

she's not in any pain or discomfort from it.

She needs to be put on a diet too, just over 10#'s,

he sisters will be mad about not getting free feed,

I should have read some of those feeding posting closer,

maybe for the better, as I can get them to eat canned food first,

and then we'll break out the Cocoa Krispies.

The Vet Tech also had a very good endorsement for the Vet,

called her the 'Cat Lady' and said she really knew her cats.

I kinda guessed that by the way she went over her throat, I geuss checking her thyroid gland,

and then checked her guts, probally including the kidneys,

she made a growling sound and Vet said that's the 'why are you doing that' responce.

looked in her mouth and that about all I can remember now, I think it bed time,

remember Clarence "Lumpy" Rutherford?

Leave it to Beaver character,

well Goyles got a new nick-name, lol-(from her evil master(servant?))
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post #9 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-25-2006, 01:49 PM
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Thank you, I thought there was more to consider and glad you've taken the time to explain that going the extra 20% financially would be worth it,

I will try to get with the Vet this week to discuss the details of the wide option,

I thought it a little strange Vet didn't take a tissue sample yesterday,

but being it is going to be removed anyhow maybe it best to do the sample later.

I think I have a web adress and I'll try to see about a email option to get more information to be sure whatever is being done is max value for her.
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post #10 of 19 (permalink) Old 05-01-2006, 09:07 PM
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Her belly tumor was removed and she's just got home and is very touchy, I geuss I should have insisted on giving her the pain medicine before we left the Vets,

but she got a dose now and is wandering around the basement while I restrain her sisters in the livingroom so they don't bother her for a little while,

I just have to check the stitches 2 times a day and make sure everything heals okay than the stitches are the dissolving kind so we won't have to go back for anything if all goes well,

she's got pain medicine for 4 days and the sample from the tumor will be sent off to a lab thus the results won't be here for 7 to 10 days according to the paperwork,

just brought her upstairs to make sure she hadn't tore open her stitches and offered her some food, had to pick her up under her hind feet and she sure didn't like that but she's in the bedroom now and hopefully will lay down and rest for a few hours,

she hasn't ate or drank anything yet, so hopefully the painkiller will work it's magic because I still have to give her thyroid medicine, we'll wait till just before I go to bed though, I'd like to see her drink some water before I give her a half of the pill.
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