What Happened to the Honebees? Serious - Cat Forum : Cat Discussion Forums
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post #1 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-21-2010, 08:01 PM Thread Starter
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What Happened to the Honebees? Serious

I haven't seen a honeybee for a couple of years now. They are essential to certain crops. So I checked Google.

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The growing consensus among researchers is that multiple factors such as poor nutrition and exposure to pesticides can interact to weaken colonies and make them susceptible to a virus-mediated collapse. In the case of our experiments in greenhouses, the stress of being confined to a relatively small space could have been enough to make colonies succumb to IAPV [Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus] and die with CCD-like symptoms.
Meanwhile many beekeepers have had some success at preventing colony loss by redoubling their efforts at improving their colonies’ diets, keeping infections and parasites such as varroa and nosema in check, and practicing good hygiene. In particular, research has shown that sterilizing old beehive frames with gamma rays before reusing them cuts down the risk of colony collapse. And simple changes in agricultural practices such as breaking up monocultures with hedgerows could help restore balance in honeybees’ diets, while providing nourishment to wild pollinators as well.
In short, CCD seems a bit like human AIDS — an immunodeficiency which allows secondary infections and parasites to take over. It’s a complex issue with a complex solution.
mental_floss Blog What Happened to the Honeybees

I have many bumble bees. Perhaps nature is trying to compensate. ??

August is the month for Monarch butterflies, and I haven't seen one yet. Wouldn't that be a terrible loss? I love butterflies!




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post #2 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-21-2010, 09:51 PM
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I have a lot of bumblebees in my garden too---right now going crazy gathering nectar from hydrangea blooms, both the small and larger ones, but haven't seen a lot of honeybees either, nor as many wasps as usual.

But for past few weeks I've seen Monarchs, all flying in a south west direction so they're migrating now. From Toronto area, they fly along Lake Ontario and cross at places like Niagara Falls and Point Pelee Park that juts out into Lake Erie.
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post #3 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-21-2010, 10:09 PM Thread Starter
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Good! A corner of PA is on Lake Erie, and Niagara Falls are not far either.




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post #4 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-22-2010, 12:24 AM
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I hadn't seen a single honeybee in more than two years and, yes, the bumblebee population has increased some. I've been sowing native wildflower seeds since last year, and I also grew about 100 sunflowers this year. I've also left some areas that I used to cut grow up in weeds. A flower is a flower, and I want to give the bees as much variety as I can. This year I finally saw honeybees! Maybe not as many as I used to see, but definitely a significant number. I plan to add more and more flowering plants and trees every year, just to see if my efforts are helping bring them back. The world can't live without pollinators!

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post #5 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-22-2010, 01:26 AM
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Both types of bee populations are more scarce here in SC. My dad had to teach himself how to cross-pollinate the plants in the garden!!
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post #6 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-26-2010, 09:08 AM
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I've not seen many bees this month. I havent seen a single fluttterby.

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post #7 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-26-2010, 11:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swimkris View Post
Both types of bee populations are more scarce here in SC. My dad had to teach himself how to cross-pollinate the plants in the garden!!
Same here in NC, swimkris. No bumblebees...no monarchs yet this year (I saw one last year when we first moved here). We do have butterfly bushes set up by our complex's pool, and we get some beautiful big black butterflies and the big yellow and black ones.
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post #8 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-26-2010, 12:13 PM
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Its' started

This is how we'll go out. Not with a bang but a wimper. First the bees, then the flowers, then our crops.

I'd like to point out that CCD began during George Bush's reign.
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post #9 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-26-2010, 12:20 PM Thread Starter
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You could be right, Dave! That's why I added the word, "Serious" to the title of the thread. We can't live without the pollinators. We have to take this seriously, and encourage the honeybees. If insecticides are partially responsible, we have to find a ways to do without them. It's better than losing our food supply.




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post #10 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-26-2010, 01:29 PM
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honeybees are imported from Europe. Bumblebees are natives. i keep a watch and although there are a lot less Honeybees there still are a few around here. We have all sorts of other pollinators, like birds and flies and mason bees and hornets. The problem is the way we have abused the honeybees.
They take them all over the countryside in trucks. they are exposed to chemical fertilizers and insecticides. DUH... so they are stressed and weakened and it doesn't take much to just push them over the edge. I know some organic beekeepers and they are NOT having this problem.
There is also a population of wild bees somewhere in the northwest USA that have become resistant to the varroa mites...
what has to change is how we farm..
buy locally produced food whenever you can.


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