Remote starters - Cat Forum : Cat Discussion Forums
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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-01-2005, 02:51 PM Thread Starter
 
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Remote starters

Has anyone ever added a remote starter to your vehicle? Is it something we could do ourselves or is professional installation recommended?

I've wanted this for a long time.
mismodliz is offline  
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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-01-2005, 03:16 PM
 
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my dad has one. it is a pretty easy install, but it SHOULD be done by a proffessional. you dont need to pay an expensive shop rate tho. most people that can install alarms can install these kits. so just ask some friends if they know of anyone that can install alarms. side jobs that are undert he table are usually ALOT cheaper. my husband does these installs for his business and would usually only charge 100-200 dollars...

a shop rate around here is about 4-500 dollars. CAD
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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-01-2005, 03:34 PM
 
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I love my remote start -- luckily I belong to the local Neon Car Club and one of the members does audio/alarm installs for a living and installed mine for just the cost of the unit. He did install on in my gf's car also for about $130.

As for personal installs...it really depends on how technically proficient you are. Cutting and splicing wires is simple if you know how to do it.

Check your local car audio install shops -- most run specials for installs (I've seen them around here anywhere from $89-$160 installed for your basic remote start kit)
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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-01-2005, 03:40 PM
 
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Best Buy has them for a decent price and does installs -- it's crazy around Christmas, though, so beware when searching. You can have them put your choice on the side for you when it comes in, though, if it's not there.
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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-03-2005, 05:34 AM
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My bf has them in his cars (2/3) and he loves them. He just opened up a new car repair/custom install shop so if you're in the Philly area send over a PM!
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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-03-2005, 10:58 AM Thread Starter
 
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Unfortunately, I'm in Kansas. I used to know a bunch of guys who installed car stereos and did jobs on the side, but we've moved since then.
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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-03-2005, 08:16 PM
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May I offer a word of caution? I understand the appeal of a remote starter when winter hits hard but if you use it and then leave your car's engine idling for a long time(over 3-5 minutes is "long" for this), you will be damaging the engine's internals. Modern vehicles do not need a "warm-up" period like they did when equipped with carburetors. All vehicles use computer-controlled fuel injection systems now and the computer will keep the engine from "dieing" when still cold. With the engine idling, no other parts of the vehicle are warming up and they need to too.

The best way to keep the engine sound internally is to start it up and as soon as you can, drive off............slowly, allowing all the vehicle's components(transmission, tires, brakes, axles, suspension bearings, steering, etc.) to warm up at the same time. Doing this allows for the overall vehicle to acclimate to the ambient temperature.

Yes, I know the heater won't be pushing out warm air at first but it won't take but a few miles for that to happen. If the engine is all that is warmed up and you get in and take off too rapidly, the other components will suffer excessive, premature wear......................


See "Cold Temperatures" para.

Dan
post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-03-2005, 08:19 PM
 
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Wow, great information lightninrod...thanks.
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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-03-2005, 09:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lightninrod
May I offer a word of caution? I understand the appeal of a remote starter when winter hits hard but if you use it and then leave your car's engine idling for a long time(over 3-5 minutes is "long" for this), you will be damaging the engine's internals. Modern vehicles do not need a "warm-up" period like they did when equipped with carburetors. All vehicles use computer-controlled fuel injection systems now and the computer will keep the engine from "dieing" when still cold. With the engine idling, no other parts of the vehicle are warming up and they need to too.
I do not want to argue because that is not my intention. But how do engine internals themselves fail with idling at, say, 800-1000 rpm yet are under no real stress when cruising along at 2000-2500rpm?

The parts about carbureted engines dying when cold is often the result of an improperly adjusted choke. I had carbed cars with both hot air and electric chokes. They never died when in tune.

Quote:
The best way to keep the engine sound internally is to start it up and as soon as you can, drive off............slowly, allowing all the vehicle's components(transmission, tires, brakes, axles, suspension bearings, steering, etc.) to warm up at the same time. Doing this allows for the overall vehicle to acclimate to the ambient temperature.
My car is a 2005 model and my previous car was a 1998. Both were manual transmission cars. The hydraulic clutch was very sluggish until well warmed up. 2-3 minutes was NOT sufficient. After just 2-3 minutes, the clutch was still sluggish enough that if I "sidestepped" the clutch, it would slowly engage and the shift was still smooth.

Quote:
Yes, I know the heater won't be pushing out warm air at first but it won't take but a few miles for that to happen. If the engine is all that is warmed up and you get in and take off too rapidly, the other components will suffer excessive, premature wear......................
Sometimes there is but no choice than to let the car warm up for extended periods of time. If a vehicle has been outside in an ice storm, you are not going anywhere until the ice has melted...period. No amount of scraping will help.

On cold days, no heater will warm up to full temperature in a matter of minutes. The cooling system capacities are smaller than cars of, say, 10-20 years ago. Also, with four cylinders being common, you have fewer cylinders firing to warm up the coolant. When I leave my driveway after only 30 seconds of engine operation, it takes more than a few miles until my heater is pumping out toasty warm air. And my cooling system is functioning normally.

Btw Dan, when do you consider a car fully warmed up? My definition of fully warmed up is when the coolant reaches the temperature required to open the thermostat. And with the vast majority of engines having 195F thermostats, it takes more than a few minutes to reach that temperature.

Now mind you Dan, I DO NOT advocate letting the engine run for the sake of running. With gas being so costly, it is a senseless waste of money to let a car warm up. And I will not warm up my car unless there is a decent accumulation of ice on my windows. But for those specific times, not much else one can do other than warm up the engine.

Once again, not trying to argue. Just state my opinions and whatnot.
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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-04-2005, 09:10 PM
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No argument Don. I agree with much of what you posted; yes, properly adjusted carbs/chokes shouldn't 'die', the ice storm comment, hot air/heater needing longer times---but I was trying to help someone not "into" cars as you and I are.

I made the mistake of assuming her car(as the majority are--I think?) has an automatic tranny.

As for "fully warmed up", I again was emphazing that the whole vehicle needs to warm up(gradually), not just the engine(oil, coolant).

If an engine has quite a few miles on it, fuel may seep past the piston rings at idle, diluting the oil's viscosity. Carbon deposits may form more readily when idling too.

I'll bet you know what an "Italian tune-up" means....right?

Dan
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