Thermostat troubles - Cat Forum : Cat Discussion Forums
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post #1 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-05-2005, 05:43 PM Thread Starter
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Thermostat troubles

Over the weekend, I installed a programmable thermostat to replace the manual dial. Although it is set at the same temperature as we had it on with the manual dial (about 64-66), it is so cold in here! Anyone have any ideas on what could be the problem or have any tips on how to make it more comfortable? I'm trying to cut our heating costs this winter, but I don't want to freeze to death doing it!
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post #2 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-05-2005, 06:14 PM
 
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My guess is that the OLD thermostat was not as accurate as the new unit is so the temperature you are setting to is actually lower than what the old unit said. Why not just bump the new unit range UP a few degrees. In addition, it is possible that the new unit is defective which might be the problem too.

When in doubt get a thermometer, place it in the room, and see what IT SAYS is the temperature in the room.
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post #3 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-05-2005, 06:59 PM
 
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Well, 64-66 degrees IS cold! I've got mine set at 64 but I turn off the registers in the rooms I don't use a lot and close their doors. I've got 3 space heaters going too. I'm dressing in layers also. Right now I'm wearing a cotton sleeveless summer tank top, thermal long sleeve underwear top and a fleecy topper.
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post #4 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-05-2005, 07:08 PM
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I have to echo what Clint said. Get a thermometer and see if it really is the temperature that's set. The old bimetal/mercury switch dial thermostats are extremely reliable but not very accurate.

The other thing is that maybe the thermostat is not in a good location to evenly regulate temperature in the whole house.

The third thing is that if the programmable thermostat has adjustable anticipation, you may have to reset it for shorter heating cycles.
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post #5 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-05-2005, 09:28 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timskitties
The other thing is that maybe the thermostat is not in a good location to evenly regulate temperature in the whole house.
I am positive this is the problem in our two-story condo. The programable thermostat downstairs reads 69, but it is ice-cold down there. However, the upstairs is much warmer. It doesn't help that we have two big sliding glass doors on either side of the downstairs. I can't wait until our chimney is cleaned and we can start heating our place naturally. Of course, the bedroom is above the fireplace, all the heat will rise, and then we won't sleep because it's too hot!!

I know heat rises, but it sure makes it difficult to heat a two-story place. I wonder how ANYONE manages it.
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post #6 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-05-2005, 10:18 PM
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It's called "zoned" heating (and cooling) and uses several thermostats in various parts of the house, one for each zone. Then the heating (or cooling) is regulated (in various ways depending on the type of heat/cooling) to each zone independently, depending on the thermostat setting for that zone.

http://www.onthehouse.com/tips/20010518
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post #7 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-05-2005, 10:19 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timskitties
Get a thermometer and see if it really is the temperature that's set. The old bimetal/mercury switch dial thermostats are extremely reliable but not very accurate.
I'm positive this is what the problem is -- it must have been reading as 64 to 66 but really was a different temperature altogether. I've had it at 70 now for about four hours, and it feels toasty in here, so it is just going to take some experimentation to get it set just right. Thanks for the tips!

Tina, I think we had the same trouble you had last year -- the thermostat was near the stairs in our two story apartment last year and set about 68 degrees constantly, but we were wearing double layers all the time. Our upstairs bedroom was always warm though...
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post #8 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-05-2005, 11:29 PM
 
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I used to love the idea of having a home with an upstairs. Now I'm thinking a main floor with basement would be better. People expect basements to be a bit cool... not to freeze their tushes off in your living room.
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post #9 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-06-2005, 05:06 AM
 
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My fav subject

First let me say this - I have a strong background in physical science and applied my full "facilities" to solving such a problem when I did maintenance in an OLD apartment house.

Thermostats are the "brain" of a heating/cooling system, but unfortunately are WAY too often misused, misapplied, or improperly installed.

HVAC systems (like airplanes) are (1) designed by people with PH'Ds, (2) built by people with Masters, (3) Installed by people with MAYBE some college, and finally (4) serviced by HS dropouts!

Each type of system and installation will have peculiar installation problems which the installer must REALLY be knowledgable concerning.

Without complete info on your system - short of paying for the BEST HVAC consultant in your area to come out and look at your problem (which is ALWAYS a good idea!), keep experimenting with your programmable. If it does not do the trick for you (and they only work right when PROPERLY installed for a HVAC setup they are designed for) then go back to the (so-called) old fashioned bi-metal (get a new one) type (Honeywell, etc.) They are reliable and accurate EXCEPT for one small problem and that is the "anticipator" (which I personaly think was and is a design mistake) as Timskitties mentioned (sounds like TK will know what I'm "tacking aboot" - Hi TK! ). Anticipators need to be properly "set" (or disabled IMO!).

Bottom line is... unless you have a modern system installed in a quality built (insulated) house/apt, etc. by a QUALIFIED installer it becomes increasingly difficult to get a properly functioning system the further away from this criteria you get.

If you need more help, I'm here, but need specifics on what type the HVAC system is and the house its in.

Gotta go...Fluffy's hungry!!!
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post #10 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-06-2005, 05:14 AM
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MMM....how close is the thermometer to the nearest lightbulb?
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