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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 04-02-2006, 11:54 AM Thread Starter
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Dog Owners

I'm curious if all the dog owners here work full time. I've been researching about getting a dog (I'm one of these sad people who do tons of research before getting anything ) I've always wanted one and since we've moved to a bigger place I though it may just be possible except all the sites and breeders say that a dog should not be left for more than 4 hours. Many breeders refuse to sell a dog to anyone who works full time. Both myself and hubby work and can't give up work for a dog or cut hours. I'm sadly having to discard the idea of a dog because of this. I wouldn't dream of having one if my lifestyle isn't suitable. How do the dog owners here cope?

Claire x
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 04-02-2006, 01:32 PM
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It's hard to find anyone who doesn't have to work 8 hours now, Misty. If you have a fenced in yard and a nice house to get out of the rain, your dog will have lots to see, but will be overjoyed to see you come home. It would be difficult for the dog to stay inside those hours because he'll have to eliminate. If you hae a large garden, you'll hae to get a wee (?) Collie! They're a bonnie breed. I wouldna hae another! They're so sweet. My collies raised two rescued kittens!

Of course, if you have a small apartment or yard, it would be better to get a dog that doesn't need as much exercise. Whatever you decide, if your cat likes dogs they'll have each other for company. Let us know what you decide.




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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 04-02-2006, 04:45 PM
 
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Everyone I know who has a dog works full time. Now, it is impossible to have a puppy or very young dog (less than 1 or 2) if you are working full time, because they need someone who is around much more often, particularly for training purposes. If you have a yard and a dogy door you could probably get a dog that is a young adult and already somewhat trained and be absolutely fine! Now, in our situation, we are in an apartment with NO yard. Many of the reasons we got Vinnie is because he fits in so well. He is older (about and came to us already trained. He can easily go up to 8 hours with out having an accident. He sleeps when we are gone. And we are able to let him have the full run of the apartment when we are gone as well. He and Ivan are best friends and keep each other entertained when he is not sleeping. We come home, he is very happy to see us, we take him for a long walk or run, play, etc., and then watch tv and go to sleep. On our days off we usually take him to the beach where he can run off leash and get excercose and play with other dogs for a few hours.

You are right, though, many breeders will not sell to someone who works full time, especially not a puppy. Likely you will have more luck, in many aspects, going to a shelter and a more mature dog. Shelters are alot less picky.
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 04-02-2006, 06:14 PM
 
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I have 2 dogs and work full time. Mine are inside all day while I'm gone. They're usually okay but I do leave out puppy pads just in case they need to go. That only happens about once a year-usually in the wintertime after a snow and Bear tries very hard to eat all of the snow that fell in the yard overnight . I will be selling my house and moving in closer so now that they are starting to get older (5), I can come home at lunch and let them out. So far they don't have any problems and I'm pretty sure they just sleep all day while I'm gone, but as they get older I'm sure they won't be able to hold it all day anymore, (or all night for that matter )
I actually got my second dog mainly to keep my first dog company while I'm gone.
They get a hour long walk every day, and lots of fetch in the yard.
I'm uncomfortable having my dogs off leash, but a lot of people I know will end their walk somewhere that they can toss a ball and let the dog just run!
I will sometimes leave on the TV for them while I'm gone too!
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 04-02-2006, 06:45 PM
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Hi Misty,

Professional dog walkers really aren't very expensive. Depending on where you live, you can probably hire someone for a $10-$15 mid-day visit. Your dog gets attention (to break up an otherwise very long day), some exercise, and an opportunity to take care of bodily needs.

I've had a dog when I've worked full-time. I always hired someone to come for a mid-day walk. I know that I wouldn't want to be locked up for 10 hours straight, all by myself and without a bathroom.

Lori F. is owned by:
Sadie, the four-legged dog
Martin, the three-legged cat
Paul, the two-legged husband
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 04-03-2006, 03:41 AM Thread Starter
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My parents live within eysight of our place and my dad loves animals. He's baby sitting the cats when we go on holiday. He realy wants a grandkid so I'd be delighted to have another 4 legged one He'd no doubt love a furbaby to go out with him. My other advantage is I get excellent holidays. I am a teacher so get loads of time off (sickening I know )

I'm just such a worrier. I'd hate to think I was upsetting a dog. I like the idea of a doggy door to the back yard. Wouldn't the cats work that one out and sneak outside? My hubby is very handy building things so if we went for that option or the yard option no doubt he'd build a super duper kennel.

decisions, decisions

Claire x
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 04-03-2006, 03:46 AM
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I am a full time student, and am often gone for 8 hours and over. We have two poodles, one 7 lbs and the other 14 lbs. We have always crated them and they are completely housebroken. We got Daltrey, the smaller one, when he was 10 weeks old and Mojo when he was 5 months old. We have always left them for extended periods of time and never had any problems. Both dogs are completely housebroken, and were easily trained. They took to housebreaking very well, despite our absences.

When Daltrey was little, we had a bigger cage for him, so that if he had an accident, he could "get out of it". He would sometimes pee, but never poo in his crate. We moved him to a smaller crate once he hit six months, and we have never had a problem since.

Mojo had been at a puppy broker in a crate since he was 8 weeks when we purchased him at 5 months. He was already crate trained when we got him, and it only took us 2 weeks to completely housebreak him.

I have had no problems with being gone 8 hours and leaving them, but I do give them lots of attention when I get home, and Daltrey isn't crated at night. (Mojo is too hyper to leave out at night, but he doesn't mind his crate). They both get excercise and plenty of love, and probably are two of the most spoiled dogs in the world

If you do plan on getting a dog, (or two), definitely crate train. It makes everything so much easier. It helps immensely in both housebreaking AND seperation anxiety. Also, be sure that the breed you are getting is suitable for your lifestyle. You probably won't have tons of time to excercise the dog, so smaller dogs or dogs that don't need a lot of activity are probably most suitable. I did TONS of research before finally settling on poodles; I had always thought that little yappy dogs were sooo annoying, but the non-shed factor and the intelligence factor trumped the yappy (our two aren't yappy at all, so that is BIG PLUS!! We've trained them well )

All-in-all, I would say go for it. As long as you do your homework and know what you're getting into, you should be fine.
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 04-03-2006, 10:09 AM
 
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I will be selling my house and moving in closer so now that they are starting to get older (5), I can come home at lunch and let them out. So far they don't have any problems and I'm pretty sure they just sleep all day while I'm gone, but as they get older I'm sure they won't be able to hold it all day anymore, (or all night for that matter )
You might be surprised, Jennifer! Vinnie does fine, at age 8, and Howie could go all day/all night up until about age 13 and a half when his kidneys got really bad. 5 is nothing! Spring chickens!!
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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 04-03-2006, 05:01 PM
 
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We have five dogs and we both work. And a VERY common myth about dogs is that larger dogs need more exercise than smaller dogs--this is totally untrue. There are larger dogs that are far lazier than small dogs and vice versa; you just need to do your research. For instance, I have greyhounds and they sleep about 18 hours a day. Jack Russel Terriers, on the other hand, are beyond hyper. Great Danes are another large dog that has minimal exercise needs. A third large dog that fits this category is the Bouvier.

Another common myth about dogs is that you need a large house or a large yard to own a bigger dog. Again, it's all about researching the breed. Dogs that are "only" dogs often won't go outside and just play. They mainly will use their backyard to just eliminate and then will promptly come back to the door and want inside. They need their owners to stimulate them to play; you will need to exercise them.

Also, I would not get a doggy door unless it was an absolute last resort. They are so many "what ifs" with a doggy door.

Crate training is an excellent idea and I hope you have success with it Crates/kennels are considered cruel by some people in England/Europe so I don't know what the culture in Scotland thinks of crates but it's a great training tool as was mentioned.

Have you considered adopting a retired greyhound Also, there are lurchers (half greyhounds) available in Scotland, too, and this means you won't have to go through a breeder which is so positive.

Have a great time with your new friend!
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