Cat Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
26,496 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
http://www.10news.com/education/18387437/detail.html

Despite the year's economic meltdown (which itself wasn't banished but don't rule it out for next year), the most entries came from the environmental category -- for "green" or "going green."

"If I see one more corporation declare itself 'green,' I'm going to start burning tires in my backyard," wrote Ed Hardiman of Bristow, Va., in his submission.


Lake Superior State University's 2009 list of banished words:


green

carbon footprint or carbon offsetting

maverick

first dude

bailout

Wall Street/Main Street (as in "from Wall Street to Main Street")

monkey
"Especially on the Internet, many people seem to think they can make any boring name sound more attractive just by adding the word 'monkey' to it," wrote Rogier Landman of Sommerville, Mass.
<3

icon or iconic

game changer

staycation

desperate search

not so much

winner of five nominations

it's that time of year again

Think these gendarmes of jargon should "get a life"? Watch it, kiddo. That phrase was banished in 1997.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
26,496 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Staying home or close to home instead of taking a vacation (due to the economics, etc.).
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
26,496 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Every time I hear "my friend" now, my skin crawls. I would have voted for that one!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,177 Posts
oklahomegrownveg said:
People who say "my bad" should be shot IMHO.

Mick
Blog can go too. Is it sooooo much of a hassle to type two extra letters and simply say weblog, or web log?

edit: Oh, some greatly overused sayings are "throw them under the bus" and "it's all good." Hehehe, I always get on a coworker's case and ask him if he always says Throw Under The Bus merely because it is a popular phrase and he needs to feel cool by saying it? :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,074 Posts
Never heard that one before (the one about the bus).

I would make it a criminal offence to use the word like except when using similes, or expressing enjoyment
of something.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
26,496 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
This is a little off topic (shocking, I know), but have you seen the videos of Caroline Kennedy Schlossberg's recent interviews? She says "you know" repeatedly! In one sequence, lasting 2 minutes and 27 seconds, she used the phrase “you know” no fewer than 30 times.

“You know, we want to have all kinds of different voices, you know, representing us, and I think what I bring to it is, you know, my experience as a mother, as a women, as a lawyer, you know, I’ve been an education activist for the last six years here, and, you know. . . ”
I guess I'm shocked because I've always thought of her as being so eloquent and well-spoken. I saw her in an interview talking about a book she had written and I don't remember her using this phrase so often. Maybe it's nerves.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top