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For supper I planned on dipping some frozen cod fillets in a batter and frying them. However, I don't know if I should fry them from a frozen state or let them thaw first.

Anyone know?
 

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Let them lightly thaw. They're easier to handle if they're still partially frozen. That way when you dip and coat them, the filets won't fall apart.
 

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Thaw them first it will make sure they get fully cooked. If they are still partly frozen they will cook unevenly.

Edited: heres a link I found on how to handle fish

handling fish
 

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It's no problem if you cook them thoroughly Megan. Like any frozen thing, you do need to cook it properly, but if you do that then there's no problem at all.
 

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Made pan fried talapia last friday. I thawed them in the microwave and then pressed them into the coating. The instructions on the bag said to NOT thaw them at room temp but to either thaw in the micro or let thaw in the refrigerator for a day or two. NOTE: the fish did not crumble when I coated them.
 

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Judy, that does not make sense that one cannot thaw them at room temperature yet they can thaw them under a microwave?? I would think that if you thawed at room temperature, they would be good to go once they became soft.

When I fry fish, I use a deep fryer such as this one. Depending on the type and thickness of the fish, I will set the oil temp to between 320F and 370F. Delicate fish does better on a lower temp while firmer fish such as cod do well at the max temp of 370. Some fryers only have a fixed temp and that will be 370, but you just learn to adjust your time.

The thing about frying fish is that if it is still frozen when you coat it, especially with thicker portions, the coating will get too done while the center of the fish is still cold as others have mentioned. So that is why I recommend all fish, either pan fried or deep fried, to be thawed before cooking. I even cook those frozen fish portions like those from Gortons or Mrs Paul's in a deep fryer even though they do niot list directions for deep frying. They come out perfect thast way. I just let the portions thaw until they are soft but still cold. And that is how I recommend anybody fry their fish. Just do not let it get warm before frying.
 

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And after the heart attack, then what?

I'm awful when it comes to healthy eating but deep frying is as healthy as licking the electricity sockets.
 

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Donaldjr1969 said:
Judy, that does not make sense that one cannot thaw them at room temperature yet they can thaw them under a microwave??
It's recommended that nothing be thawed at room temperature because it takes hours to thaw and during that time bacteria can develop, especially in the outer area that reaches room temperature first. Cooking may not be enough to kill the bacteria.

From the USDA website:

Chill:
Chill perishable foods promptly and thaw foods properly.
Did you know that bacteria grow most rapidly at the unsafe
temperatures between 40°F and 140°F? To keep food out of this
“danger zone,” keep cold food 40°F or below, and hot food
140°F or above. Plan ahead to thaw foods. Never thaw food on
the kitchen counter at room temperature. Instead, thaw by
placing the food in the refrigerator, submerging air-tight packaged
food in cold tap water and changing the water every 30
minutes so the food continues to thaw, or defrosting food on a
plate in the microwave.

http://www.csrees.usda.gov/nea/food/pdf ... fefood.pdf
 

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doodlebug said:
Donaldjr1969 said:
Judy, that does not make sense that one cannot thaw them at room temperature yet they can thaw them under a microwave??
It's recommended that nothing be thawed at room temperature because it takes hours to thaw and during that time bacteria can develop, especially in the outer area that reaches room temperature first. Cooking may not be enough to kill the bacteria.
Hehehe, then I should be dead by now. I have thawed a roast overnight at room temperature, and cooked it all day in a crock pot. Guess what? Still here. As for the cooking not being able to fully kill the bacteria, I would bet that deep frying at a temperature of 370F/190C for 5 minutes will be quite sufficient to kill any pathogen out there. If it were not, I would be dead by now. Also, the surface of a frypan on a range burner gets even hotter.

If the USDA's publication were to be taken as the gospel truth, then my stovetop autoclave (very useful as a pressure canner/super size pressure cooker) is useless. Heck, any autoclave would be useless because...the government said so!! :roll:

What I DO believe though about Judy's tilapia fillet's warning is that it is basically a cover your backside warning. In our litigious society, nothing must be taken for granted.
 

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Well, I know that plenty of people have thawed on the counter and never had an issue, but I figure why take the chance. It's pretty easy to thaw in the fridge or microwave. A friend's son spent weeks in the hospital from salmonella, they almost lost him....
 

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I would never, ever thaw anything at room, esp. fish or chicken, but thats just me. Beef you might be able to get away with, I let steaks sit for an hour at room temp before grilling.

Back to fish... Jo, go get some fresh farm raised catfish and fry 'em in olive oil, lemon and garlic already!!!
 

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I've never done this with fish, but everything else - I take from the freezer and put straight in the oven. Mostly chicken, turkey and pork.
 

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doodlebug said:
Well, I know that plenty of people have thawed on the counter and never had an issue, but I figure why take the chance. It's pretty easy to thaw in the fridge or microwave. A friend's son spent weeks in the hospital from salmonella, they almost lost him....
Did they ever isolate the source of the infection? The problem with salmonella is that if the contamination is internal to the food, then the thawing process will not prevent it at all.
 

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catnip said:
I would never, ever thaw anything at room, esp. fish or chicken, but thats just me. Beef you might be able to get away with, I let steaks sit for an hour at room temp before grilling.
Steve, it should be noted that anything I do thaw at room temperature, it remains in its wrappers. When I thaw shrimp or chicken parts, they remain sealed in their packaging.

Back to fish... Jo, go get some fresh farm raised catfish and fry 'em in olive oil, lemon and garlic already!!!
I am a perch fan myself. I love the strong flavor of ocean perch.
 

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No, it'll just make it a LOT worse. 8O

A microwave heats food incredibly quickly and kills anything that's started to multiply. Leaving it out for hours at the PERFECT temperature for growing bacteria will make you very ill if you don't completely incinerate it..
Saying, "I do this all the time" doesn't make it ok. It makes you lucky.

Anyone who has done even the most basic food hygiene course knows this. It's frightening the number of people who don't
 

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Huge said:
And after the heart attack, then what?

I'm awful when it comes to healthy eating but deep frying is as healthy as licking the electricity sockets.
Guess what? I am still here. From the moment we are all born, we are dying. We all will die some day. It is just a matter of when and how. What's really funny is that with all the deep fried foods I eat, what do you think my total cholesterol, HDL, and LDL count would be? What do you think my triglyceride levels are? What do you think my overall heart disease risk is? I will give you a hint. VERY LOW!! According to bloodwork performed a few months ago, I am in perfect health. I just need to work on my weight! :lol: The only thing was that my LDL count was just outside of the ideal max, but that is nothing that some oatmeal cannot help.

There are so many myths about deep frying that I just shake my head in utter disbelief. The oil DOES NOT soak into the food! Your food will not absorb oil like a spoge absorbs water. Technically the hot oil does not cook the food. The oil acts as a heating element of sorts. What it does is it heats up the moisture in the food and it literally steams itself from the inside-out. And as the moisture is flowing out from your food, it keeps the oil from flowing inwards. So your foods are no more greasy than pan fried items and if anything, are probably LESS so. But...the Center for Science in the Public Interest always needs to have their 15 minutes of fame so they do what they do best. Flood the media with scare tactics on some foods and watch the sheeple in society fall for it hook, line, and sinker.

This reminds me about how coconut oil was once the kiss of death for people. Now coconut oil is actually better than imagined. What a surprise... :roll:
 

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Huge said:
No, it'll just make it a LOT worse. 8O

A microwave heats food incredibly quickly and kills anything that's started to multiply. Leaving it out for hours at the PERFECT temperature for growing bacteria will make you very ill if you don't completely incinerate it..
Saying, "I do this all the time" doesn't make it ok. It makes you lucky.

Anyone who has done even the most basic food hygiene course knows this. It's frightening the number of people who don't
Then you are probably well aware of what something called pasteurization is, Hugh. Guess what? I know how to properly COOK my food. Luck has NOTHING to do with proper food prep! Since you are a food hygienist, you should also know the fact that cooking something for 5-6 minutes at 190C is going to kill such baddies as salmonella, Escheria Coli, and even prions.

Do a bit of research on stovetop autoclaves. Would you like to see a photo of mine? I am nearly 40 and have never came down ill...EVER!!! Even during the wonderful era in the 70's when trichinosis worm was a concern in pork, I NEVER got sick. I just cannot see what is so hard for people to understand???

edit: What is scary as you even stated is that people do not know how to properly prepare their food. Hugh, I feel that the Emeril wannabes out their do not know the difference between sauteeing and braising and thus do not properly prepare their food is what creates the risk of food-borne infections. Improper food prep is far more dangerous than improper storage and thawing.
 

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Well if you don't believe over 40 years of medical studies, then fine. I just refuse to eat crap. Literally and figuratively. :D There are some stupid rumours, I agree. However, that doesn't mean people should ignore all medical advice.
 
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