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Hi,

Me and my boyfriend went to a cats protection shelter and reserved a very affection 8 year old cat called Susie. She is very shy and is too scared to go outside. We have to pass a house approval before we get her (a standard procedure in the Uk).

Anyway, although we really want a cat and could offer her a great home (my boyfriend works from home) but, i am starting to have second thoughts.

My biggest concern is that susie is 8. I don`t want a kitten but i am not sure i could cope if she got ill so soon after we got her. I don`t want to sound mean, but maybe a younger cat would be better for me? is 8 old for a cat?

Also we live in a 2 bedroom flat (large, but still a flat) will my flat smell really bad, because she can`t go out? again i don`t want to be mean, i just want to make sure susie gets the right home for her.

any advice, would be great.
Kylie
 

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Most cats live until way into their teens - about 16-18 years old. some even make it into their 20's. So, 8 isn't really that old for a cat - just middle aged.

I also live in a flat with a cat that cant go outside (and who is 8 years old as it happens) and my flat does not smell in the slightest. Just get a good quality cat litter and scoop regularly and you will be fine.

Welcome to the forum. Always good to see another Brit :D
 

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Great that you're obviously thinking about this, but as Allie has said, none of those things should be a worry (we got ours in Jan, and she's 7 with no problems at all. A friend of ours has a 21 year old cat though!).
If you DO decide to get her, we will want pictures!
 

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I live by the principle that there are plenty of families willing to resuce a young cat or kitten but not many people would stop to look at an older cat.

My whitey is now 17 and still going strong!! she has a bit of athritus and is now deaf but by gum is she still frisky!. 8 is still youngish for a cat by my standards.

As for smell... well try using an enclosed litter tray, i do and its wonderful. i scoop everyday and clean once a week and i never have trouble from it. My suki lives in my room (i rent in a shared house) and i take her out on a lead supervised. She is perfectly happy staying indoors all day, she has food, water and a cat tree and doesnt want for anything.

I think if you adopt this cat you are doing a wonderful thing, and bare in mind due to her being indoors she is going to be fighting fit for a long time as she wont be getting exposed to everyday diseases and dangerous situations!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks everyone! really great advice :)

I think i am going to go ahead with it now! i have been really upset thinking i might not be able to take her.

is the Omega Paw Self Cleaning Litter box any good? and also how about World's Best Cat Litter? I am really keen to remove any smells!
 

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kylie said:
is the Omega Paw Self Cleaning Litter box any good? and also how about World's Best Cat Litter? I am really keen to remove any smells!
I've not come across the litter box but many people on here will recommend Worlds Best Cat Litter. I've used it and it works pretty well. Theres another one called 'Oko Cats Best' which I really like (and its half the price of the Worlds Best!).

You might like to try catsan as well. Thats pretty good. If you want the clumping kind though remember to pick up the yellowy packet not the blue.
 

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Huge said:
Why not the blue?
We use that, and it seems to be ok.
Oh - well theres nothing wrong with the blue, Hugh - its just not a clumping litter. Toby used the blue one before I got him but I changed to a clumping litter simply because I prefer to remove the pee as it appears. I didn't like the thought of it just collecting up like that in the litter for a week before cleaning it out. With the clumping litter, the pee creates a solid lump in the litter which can then be removed to leave behind a clean litter tray ;)
 

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I use clumping litter in both of Arianwen's litterboxes, and there is no odor.

Thank you for adopting an adult kitty. There is a big problem of people who only want to adopt kittens.

Rescue kitties make the best companions. I adopted Arianwen from a rescue when she was about a year old. I've had her for about ten months now, and she still shows her gratitude for being adopted into a loving forever home. :heart

Of course we'll need pictures of your new furry baby. :D
:eek:rcat
 

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melysion said:
You might like to try catsan as well. Thats pretty good. If you want the clumping kind though remember to pick up the yellowy packet not the blue.
K, off topic, but I had no idea that Catsan was a big brand. It's the only brand I can find here (aside from the $25 box of TidyCats I used to buy back home for $8.). Catsan is only about $1.50 a bag so I assumed it was just a no name generic. I know some litters aren't good for kitties so I always kinda wondered. Nice to know you use it too! :D I wish we had the clumping! I've only ever seen the blue bag!

On topic: Agree with the others. I live in a small apartment and have no smells. I just clean often.
 

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Welcome to the forum!
As everyone else has said, 8 is not an old cat yet, by any means. There's no reason that you won't have a healthy, happy cat for many years to come.
As for the flat and smells, I live in a studio apartment with 2 cats and it never smells. The trick really isn't in the type of litter (although some are better than others and you may prefer some to others) or the type of box, it's in keeping the box clean! :D
Right now, I use Feline Pine litter and I like it. But I've also used regular clay and clumping. Personally, I don't like clumping because it tends to track all over my apartment. But, again, you'll have to experiment and find one you like. Whatever litter I've used, the box needs to be scooped out AT LEAST two times a day. When I had a regular box, I also completely changed the litter about once a week. Now I have a box specially made for Feline Pine and I only need to change it about once a month. It does, however, have a tray underneath that needs to be emptied every few days.
So, as long as you keep the cat box clean, t will not smell.
Now, fur everywhere, that's another story...but I know the joy of having that little creature in your home and your heart will far outweigh any bit of extra housecleaning she may cause! :lol:
 

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All but one of my cats are 10 years old or more. And they have a LOT of energy!! To see them play, one would not think that they are as old as they are. Willie and Tooties have the energy of a young cat despite being 10 yrs old. So really, you are definitely going to enjoy adopting this kitty. :)
 

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The best tin might be to get a kitten so you can train th kitten to how you need her/him to act. If you decide this, you will be better of just going to a smaller cat shelter who will no as to check the house. As happened with Casper.
 

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Hi and Welcome! I have four kittys in a small place, no problems. As for the smell, I clean it out before I go to work, when I get home and before I go to bed. If I am around I clean as it is used. Smells under control. Hugs and Congrats! Looking forward to pictures.
 

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Lucinda said:
The best tin might be to get a kitten so you can train th kitten to how you need her/him to act.
I had the exact opposite theory when I was looking for a cat actually :p I thought an adult cat would be easier because then they might already be litter-trained. :)

I agree with everyone else though; small place, scoop often, no smells! :D
 

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i use clumping cat litter too... it only smells if you go right near the litter itself. or if they were just in it.

they both have a habit of not burying!! Im not sure why.... but it doesnt help the smell factor. luckily were in a house and the litter is in the basement. they scratch at the side of the lid of the litter box, and think its doing something, lol.
 

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Claiken said:
i use clumping cat litter too... it only smells if you go right near the litter itself. or if they were just in it.

they both have a habit of not burying!! Im not sure why.... but it doesnt help the smell factor. luckily were in a house and the litter is in the basement. they scratch at the side of the lid of the litter box, and think its doing something, lol.
Arianwen used to do the same thing. I think her covering instinct got short-circuited when her hand hit the lid on the litterbox. It took her a while, and some coaching but she figured it out. Now she does her hand on the inside of the litterbox cover to knock the litter off of it, not 'cause she's trying to cover her business. :D
 

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Welcome and congrats on your new addition! I agree with everyone about the smell not being a problem as long as you scoop often.

Probably more importantly, I agree that after the kitty is yours and you've grown to love it (which will probably take about 30 seconds), you find you have a much higher tolerance for things than you might have guessed. I'm pretty much a clean freak, and I didn't even freak out at a cat who was peeing on the furniture! Love conquers all, and living things take priority over material things. :lol:
 

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I live in fairly small 2-bedroom condo and I have a 9 month old indoor cat. The only time it ever smells is in the 20 minutes after she does a poop (once to twice a day), and with proper litter box cleaning this isn't an issue. I use the half-crystals/half-clay blend, but again, the key is keeping the litter box as clean as possible. Also try to place it in a location where you're unlikely to be for long periods of time. When I first got her I made the mistake of having her box right next to the computer. As a college student who has to sit and type out papers all the time, it was no fun at all to have to endure 20 minutes of stink after every poop 8O It's in the hallway now though, so it's not a problem anymore.

As far as age goes, I would consider an 8 year old cat to be the equivalent of a human in their late 30's/early 40's. Obviously they are more at risk to disease and illness than a younger cat, but it's safe to assume that you would have at least 6 or 7 more years with him/her, and perhaps as many as 10 or 12. My first cat died at the age of 15 of cancer. Prior to the cancer he was completely healthy, people often guessed his age as 3 or 4, so I'm convinced that if it weren't for the cancer he could have easily lived into his early 20's. The key is providing opportunities for frequent exercise, mental stimulation, and not overfeeding!
 
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