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Discussion Starter #1
My fiance and I have discussed on more than one occasion that sometime in the future, maybe the next year or two we will adopt a 3rd kitten. I know adult cats need to be adopted much more but with two cats already, I just think a kitten intro will be so much easier for us..

Either way, we'll definitely be adopting from a shelter/pound. I'm abit torn between a kill/no kill though... I mean, there is an amazing rescue site here that lists so many animals in care for different rescue groups, most of which are no kill.. All the pets are well looked after, a lot of them in foster homes. Then there's the local 'pounds' that advertise their animals as a number and they even list the "out date". This breaks my heart knowing that these animals have limited days and it makes me want to save one the day of/before it's "out date".. BUT I also feel like the adoption fee would be better appreciated at a 'no kill' shelter/rescue plus, adopting a kitty from one of them does give them the space for a new kitty.

What are your opinions. Adopt from a 'pound' to save a life more directly, or a no kill rescue where they put so much more time/care/love into what they do? (I think I've almost decided what I want to just from writing it all down but I'd like to hear other people's thoughts).
 

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I did one of each with my cats. Apollo came from a kill shelter, because they had so many kittens at the time and I really wanted to save one that I felt was in desperate need.

Athena I got from a no-kill shelter because I needed some more specific requirements (such as matching temperament for Apollo) which is easier to assess when you get a cat that's been fostered by someone and can get more direct help in selecting a cat.
 

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My opinion is adopt from a rescue that fosters in their homes. that way they get to know the personalities and theyve had lots of socialization. Kittenhood lasts just so long and then they are teenage adults. If you want the experience of a kitten then go for it. Be prepared for a kitten to get into everything.

I do know a rescue in my area which are pulling dogs and cats off death row from the pound. They foster in their homes. Great organization to work with.

With each cat or dog rescued from a no kill group makes room for another rescue animal to come in for them to foster.

Im glad youve choosen to adopt a rescue. Black kittens are the hardest to get adopted. I had gotten two black long haired,12 week old, brothers who are the most wonderful goofballs but no one will give them a second look. Ive had them for two years now.

We look forward to meeting your new members of your family.
 

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I don't think it matters...either way a cat is rescued and makes room for another. Depending on where you live, more often than not the kittens have no trouble finding a home anyway (unless they have some sort of medical issue).

Adopt from a 'pound' to save a life more directly, or a no kill rescue where they put so much more time/care/love into what they do?
Just because a shelter is designated as no kill does not mean they put more time/care/love into what they do. In fact their no kill designation can make a cat suffer way more than they should have to because a true no kill will not euthanize for any reason. And think about it...is the person working at a kill shelter heartless or do they love animals so much that they deal with that heart wrenching environment just to help those unfortunate animals for whatever short time they can?
 

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I would say adopt from a no-kill for several reasons: 1) You are making more room for a new cat at the shelter. 2) You are might have the ability to "return" or "trade-in" the cat if it isn't working out with your current cats. 3) Local shelters often include vaccines and spay/neuter costs in the adoption fees. 4) Like others have mentioned, shelters will probably have a better idea of the cat's personalities. 5) You would be supporting your local shelter, which sometimes leads to state recognition if they are non-profit or a charity organization. The shelter where I adopted my cats was recently named an "Angel" charity for SC (which means that they are a reputable and noteworthy), so they have gained even more recognition and help for their cause through that status. Just in the past year since I've been going there, they've received some huge donations that have allowed them to remodel some areas of the shelter, put in misting/cooling systems for their puppies, etc.
 

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Well, I say adopt from where you find the perfect match.

I've visited a no-kill location with 800+ cats and the cats are well cared for and all get along; but it's somewhat overwhelming. "No-kill" in the true sense of the word is not feasible in most locations, the cost to run is staggering.

Meanwhile, the ones at the kill facilities might be put to sleep so if there is such a place in your area, I would go there first.

Often kill facilities ship their cats to no-kill locations or foster out as much as possible to aviod this - these people aren't heartless and they care for their animals as much as no-kill locations, they just have to make tough choices as they do not have the funding to do otherwise; don't think you're supporting something "evil".
 

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Discussion Starter #7
My opinion is adopt from a rescue that fosters in their homes. that way they get to know the personalities and theyve had lots of socialization. Kittenhood lasts just so long and then they are teenage adults. If you want the experience of a kitten then go for it. Be prepared for a kitten to get into everything.

I do know a rescue in my area which are pulling dogs and cats off death row from the pound. They foster in their homes. Great organization to work with.

Im glad youve choosen to adopt a rescue. Black kittens are the hardest to get adopted. I had gotten two black long haired,12 week old, brothers who are the most wonderful goofballs but no one will give them a second look. Ive had them for two years now.
That's exactly what my thoughts were.

Both Sammy and Meeka were kittens when I adopted them, Sammy 8 weeks and Meeka about 13 so I know how naughty they can be. It's just that Sammy sometimes gets funny with older cats, he's gotten on well with some and HATES others but has always accepted any kittens he's met.. I know my partner wants to get a kitten rather than an adult but the whole kitten thing is over in a few months anyway so I'm not worried about that, it's just the intros that worries me a little. I'd def consider a juvenile cat/older kitten OR trial an adult but I'd have to make sure wherever we rescued from would be willing to do a trial period I think..

That's so sad that no one has been interested in your long haired black boys! I'd LOVE a long haired black boy!!!
 

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Well, I say adopt from where you find the perfect match.

I've visited a no-kill location with 800+ cats and the cats are well cared for and all get along; but it's somewhat overwhelming. "No-kill" in the true sense of the word is not feasible in most locations, the cost to run is staggering.

Meanwhile, the ones at the kill facilities might be put to sleep so if there is such a place in your area, I would go there first.

Often kill facilities ship their cats to no-kill locations or foster out as much as possible to aviod this - these people aren't heartless and they care for their animals as much as no-kill locations, they just have to make tough choices as they do not have the funding to do otherwise; don't think you're supporting something "evil".
When we adopted Meeka, we had in mind that we wanted a grey long haired kitty.. I looked at all different rescues, kill and no kill shelters both in the area and some shelters even an hour away. It was hard that we were so particular with what we wanted but I'd just changed my mind from getting a Ragdoll, I wanted to adopt a needy kitty instead but also thought she'd be our last adoption or a long long time. (Funny how that's now changed!) I ended up getting her from the local 'pound', where I know animals do get put to sleep. Her adoption fee included her microchipping and de-sexing but it was very 'impersonal' I guess and she was just a 'kitten' - no one really knew anything about her - when I pointed her out in the cage, they even had to check her sex! I know these places aren't evil and it's great they adopt out and include m/c & de-sex for such a low adoption fee BUT I've also had experience with no-kill rescues and I know how much work and love the mostly volunteer carers put into what they do. People that take animals into their own homes, treat them as their own pets until they can get forever homes. I think adopting a kitten from these people is not only rewarding for you, the adopter but probably moreso for the carer to know their 'babies' are going to be loved forever.. I'm leaning way more towards one of those types of rescues but I have to admit there is a part of me that thinks but these cats are safe and loved now, maybe it would be better to save one on death row.. I just feel like the foster carers would appreciate it more.
 

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We adopt from the kill shelter because our kill shelter does try very hard to re-home as many animals as they can, and theyey really don't want to kill any animal. Also, the no-kill cats will not be put in any danger if we don't adopt them, so we want to help the ones who may have no other option.

Either way, you are giving a homeless cat a loving home and you are making a good decision.
 

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Yes I agree. Either way, you're saving a life and enriching your own. If it were me, I'd also choose one that would best match my kids at home. Because...

Both the no-kill and kill shelters have pressure but in different ways. True no-kill shelters will not kill the ones already there but would turn down potential arrivals if they're full (so no second chance for the ones they turn down) whereas kill shelters will euthanize to control their numbers. In essence, it works out to about the same thing.
 

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Do you have friends that are in rescue or TNR? They could tell you the best rescues to go to. If you do get a cat from a kill shelter like the humane society or the pound just be prepared for that kitten to have URI or Ringworm or other malidies. Most large shelters dont have the control or funding to treat large amounts of animals coming thru their doors.

My first cat my son brought me from the HS had URI so the vet bill started right away. If a cat is in a home most likely they are vetted and watched over more closely.

I also must add there are some great shelters and some that are riddled with politics and dont have the knowledge or will to help a sick animal. 2 months ago a cat starved it self to death at our "no kill" shelter. I can walk thru the shelter & in 30 minutes I can point out sick cats they dont even notice. But their volunteers arent trained and dont have the knowledge. So this "no Kill" continues to sweep under the rug rather than learn from their mistakes. Its a sad state of affairs. Even the vets in the area are hearing how bad it is. But nothing can be done.
 

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That's an interesting question. Since adopting Rookie in 2005, I've been so bothered by the number of cats at my local SPCA (usually 300), and thinking about them constantly. Poor things, living in a cage.

I think I'd err on the side of adopting from your closest shelter, whether it's kill or no-kill. There's an advantage to getting the kitten from a closeby place -- for one, you might want to ask their opinion on something, you may want to ask them for a referral of some type (that's how I found my great cat-sitter, one of their former employees), and you may decide to start donating things like towels, blankets, etc., to them.
 

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Yeah I think adopting from a place where the kittens/cats are fostered would probably be your best bet. Either way you're saving an animal, and while I too was compelled to get my first kitten from a kill shelter, I think since you already have two cats, it's particularly important to be able to know the temperament of the new cat.

Apollo was easy. We walked into the local kill shelter, scanned the plethora of kittens, and picked out a social, healthy-looking one whom another couple had turned down because he was "too wild" for their children (ohh Apollo ;) ).

Athena was picked out with very special requirements: we needed a kitten compatible with Apollo's very social, playful, rough temperament who could wrestle with him and not freak out. There's no way a kill shelter would have been able to help me pick out the right cat, sadly, since they just don't have time/resources to get to know all of their animals. So any shelter where the volunteers seem to know a lot about their animals is a good idea, to make sure you're getting a kitten compatible with your current two. I think either is a very good place to get a cat, it's just that with existing cats already, you've got that extra requirement to meet of compatibility.
 

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I agree with others that Rescues, especially fostered in homes, will know the personality of a kitten, though there may be some humane societies where the volunteers are knowledgeable and can spend quality time with the kitties or have a bunch of kitties together in one room for play sessions. I wouldn't be so hung up on a particular color or pattern. What I would emphasize is that you spend enough time, at least an hour's observation or longer and play with kitties on different days to be able to assess their personality. Choose the one that chooses you, one that is calm and laid back. That one will form a bond with you, and and most likely get along well with your other two cats.
 

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It's late and I didn't read all the replies...
Adopt from a 'pound' to save a life more directly, or a no kill rescue where they put so much more time/care/love into what they do?
I would have to disagree with the end of your question. Even if the shelter is a "kill shelter" (I'm speaking from experience with ONLY our shelter in this county.) they put time into those animals. The money from the adoption fees is put towards food and litter, ect ect. The reason the animals are euthanized is simply because there's too many animals coming in and not enough getting adopted. The people that work at the "kill shelters" take the time to learn something about the animals so they can give potential adopters some background information when possible.

I have adopted from this shelter and if I didn't already have 5 house cats, I would adopt another. I adopted Macy awhile ago and I am so glad I did. She is one of those that more then likely would have been euthanized due to her "attitude" that she had with everyone except me.

Goodluck with your adopting!! :)
 

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I could be wrong but I thought that most non kill shelters would eventually send overflow to kill shelters.
 
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