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Hi all,
Last week I adopted a 10 week old kitten. He is so sweet and playful but I’m beginning to have serious adoption blues. He’s very clingy and doesn’t leave me for a second. I have kept him secluded in a guest bedroom with everything he needs while he gets acclimated and every time I leave him in there he doesn’t stop crying. When i do sit in there with him he usually climbs all over me, which I don’t mind, but it’s difficult getting him to play with his toys instead. I feel so terrible but I’m not sure what to do. I’ve spent the last few days very overwhelmed, anxious and borderline depressed. I know this is common with kitten adoption and a lot of people say it passes but I’m starting to have overwhelming regrets. Any advice/suggestions would be very welcome. He’s such a sweet boy and so loveable it just breaks my heart to feel like this.
 

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I would adopt a second kitten, if you can afford it. As close as his age as you can get. Then he would have a playmate and be a little less clingy.

If you can't, for whatever reason, I would return him while he's still young and very adoptable.

Maybe later, if you still want a cat, you could adopt an adult cat who needs to be the only cat in the home. Or foster a cat, with no commitment, to see how you feel.
 

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Just wondering why you keep him shut in one room? Maybe if you let him out he would not be so clingy after a while, once he settles down and has time to acclimate to the new environment. right now you are the only safe thing he knows, so of course he is clingy.
I also think Marie's advice is good.
 

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Hi Anna. At 10 weeks old, he's still a baby and you're the Mum, so he needs a lot of attention and training right now. As long as your house is kitten-proof, you could try letting him out and see how he does. It may be enough for him to just be around you without being so clingy while he explores his new home, and he'll need a lot of things to burn off all his kitten energy. Cats love looking outside, and a cat tree in a window can works wonders. Safe cat toys that he can play with on his own would help, and interactive toys like cat wands are a fun thing for the two of you to do together. A 15 to 20 minute scheduled play session several times a day may release a lot of his pent up energy so he, and you, can relax afterward. Getting another kitten may be a good idea so he'd have a buddy to play with, but kittens are a lot of work, so I wouldn't get another one until you're sure you're ready to make that commitment.
 

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If you don't have another cat to introduce him to why would you keep him locked in one room? And who wouldn't love a kitten that is attached to his parent? He will grow into a great, loving cat.
 
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Kittens need a lot of attention. Yours has lots of growing needs (movement, play, mental stimulation, nutrition) and adjusting to a new world needs (new house, strangers, no friends, no littermates, where’s my mamma?) Putting in the work now will help him to be the best kitty he can be later. He sounds hungry for attention and mental/physical exercise. Whenever you have a moment, spend it with your new kitty. Make a lot of time to be with him, and when you don’t have time for him, do what you are doing in the same room as him. Talk to him, play with him (they love teaser wands and will often fetch little objects), and snuggle him if he seems to want that. If you need to restrict him to a room, then make that room your home, too. Don’t leave the little guy alone in a strange place.
 

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One more thought to share, which is, if you are having overwhelming regrets, it may be a sign that this is not the time for you to take on a pet. At 10 weeks he has a better chance of being adopted than he will at 14 or 16 weeks. Consider what this will be like for you over the long haul. There is no shame in deciding this is not the best situation for him. If you are worried about what others might think, take a breath and refocus on what’s best for him and yourself (usually the same choice).
 
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