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Discussion Starter #1
We have a household of 3 cats one female and two males. The most recent adult male came to us from a deceased friend about 2 years ago. He has recently started to urinate in odd places most notably on clothes which are on the floor and throw rugs. He knows where the litter box is and defecates there and urinates there but he likes to sometimes urinate in other places. He is altered and declawed.
Last evening he walked from the bedroom down the hall to a shoe box on the floor which he decided to urinate in. Today my daughter walked from her bedroom to the bathroom where she was getting dressed and the cat urinated on her clothes she was about to put on.
I have watched the cat go into a room right next to the litter box to urinate on a throw rug. We have one box for three cats.

Nothing has changed in the case of litter size. Behavior wise he is a rather "chicken" cat and hisses at the dog and the established male cat. But he has been getting along with them (not best buddys but..) in the past.

I'm kind of fed up with him. He has been difficult to integrate and I am afraid that I may have to just restrict him to one room of the house for the rest of his life.

Thoughts advice?
 

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It could be a number of things.
1) Uti - has he been to the vet to rule out medical issues? Moving into a new home, losing his person and having new cats/dog to deal with are incredibly stressful. That could cause a urinary tract infection.

2) He is declawed, this added on top of the stress above and KNOWING he has no way to defend himself against other cats/dogs is very stressful.

3) One litter box for 3 cats is really not enough. Especially if he wasn't used to sharing. How often are you cleaning the box. He may not feel it's clean enough.

Since he's been there this long and the peeing JUST started I'd rule out the vet first. Then add more litterboxes and be more diligent in cleaning them.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
1) Uti - has he been to the vet to rule out medical issues? Moving into a new home, losing his person and having new cats/dog to deal with are incredibly stressful. That could cause a urinary tract infection.
This is a *new* behavior and he has been here for 2 years now so I would hope he has gotten over the moving stress? But no I have not taken him to the vets yet, I guess I need to rule that out. He shows no behavioral signs of a problem.

2) He is declawed, this added on top of the stress above and KNOWING he has no way to defend himself against other cats/dogs is very stressful.
He came declawed and I understand your point. He sees threat in the dog but the dog is small and not interested in the car at all. The other male established cat will occasionally stalk him, and I see your point.

3) One litter box for 3 cats is really not enough. Especially if he wasn't used to sharing. How often are you cleaning the box. He may not feel it's clean enough. The house only has one area for a litter box but we may have to look harder and include another box somewhere else, perhaps he can claim it for himself but I bet the other two cats will also use it.

Since he's been there this long and the peeing JUST started I'd rule out the vet first. Then add more litter boxes and be more diligent in cleaning them.

Thanks for the advice. I think I will try a new box and the vets visit. I Just took in the established male for a blood test and found a thyroid problem that was $175 so Vets can be rather expensive. I can get my blood test for half that ammount for humans! But I will start there and add the box and see if it helps. Thanks again.
 

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The usual recommendation for litter boxes is 1 per cat +1. The fact that he's a somewhat timid cat, this is his way of asserting himself in a new household with another male and possibly dominant female cat. Besides the extra litter boxes, preferably in other locations that are quiet and out of the way (e.g. corner, but not near noisy machine like a clothes dryer or washer), with a cat that wants and has developed a preference for peeing on clothes, you have to pick up any clothes at all off the floor, so he can't pee on them...everything hung up or in a drawer or in a closed laundry hamper. You can't give him any opportunity to pee on clothes; otherwise it will be a very difficult job, if even it can be, to correct. Give him every opportunity to use the litter boxes which should be scooped 2x/day. Hope you can get on top of this behavior before it's become too engrained. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The usual recommendation for litter boxes is 1 per cat +1. The fact that he's a somewhat timid cat, this is his way of asserting himself in a new household with another male and possibly dominant female cat. Besides the extra litter boxes, preferably in other locations that are quiet and out of the way (e.g. corner, but not near noisy machine like a clothes dryer or washer), with a cat that wants and has developed a preference for peeing on clothes, you have to pick up any clothes at all off the floor, so he can't pee on them...everything hung up or in a drawer or in a closed laundry hamper. You can't give him any opportunity to pee on clothes; otherwise it will be a very difficult job, if even it can be, to correct. Give him every opportunity to use the litter boxes which should be scooped 2x/day. Hope you can get on top of this behavior before it's become too engrained. Good luck!
Female cat in the house is passive and they are great friends, sleeping together and such. The other male who is 15 can tolerate him but does occasionally stalk him. Problem cat is also peeing on throw rugs which is not easily removed and washed. I have watched his behavior and he will use the inappropriate location without the slightest regard. He looks very casual as if he is too lazy to go to the correct location. I will try the additional litter box probally first as I see no overt medical signs of stress and the box is something that can go into play quickly.
 

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You might also try a different litter; Dr. Elsey's Cat Attract litter has been used with good results by myself and other posters to attract cats back to the litter box when they start peeing elsewhere. It is more expensive than regular litter, and sometimes you can get results just by "dressing the top" of regular clumping clay litter with the Dr. Elsey's stuff.
 

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Had that problem we just added a another box and all is good. so really try a another box and make sure it is clean. " We have one box for three cats." soo not enough for 3 cats
 

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Hi,

I must agree about the number of litter boxes, each cat needs his own, and an extra one.

Is he a large cat? Maybe he finds the litter box too small?

What type of box/boxes do you have? some cats prefer covered boxes, and other cats prefer the ''open concept''.

Perhaps you can try a different type of litter in each box!

Some cats prefer the regular ''old school'' clay litter, other cats like the clumping/scoopable type...some cats won't use the scented litter while others don't mind it... some cats won't go near a litterbox that has a plastic lining!

There are other types of litter made from all sorts of materials, you may want to experiment with a few and see which he prefers.

At my place we use regular old school clay ''saular'' , a brand called ''feline pine'', and a brand called ''yesterdays news''. None of my cats like the clumping/scoopable litter, they simply did not use the litter box that was filled with it...

At my place (I have 8 cats), some litter boxes are used exclusively for peeing, while others are used exclusively for pooing... while others serve for both! ...go figure...

Cats can be a bit fussy about their litter/bathroom habits, but it's really worth trying many type of litter boxes and many types of litter box fillers.

I'm sure if you try many alternatives, your cat will finally find the one he prefers and USE it!

I am just wondering, since I don't think you mentionned it in your post... is your cat neutered? If not, then this could be the very reason you are having problems...

Please keep us updated on the situation!

sandyrivers
 

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Discussion Starter #9
This is where I am at now.
We now have two boxes in the house. Both is quiet undisturbed places. The "new" cat has stopped eliminating on clothing probally because nothing is available for him to do so. He also liked to soil throw rugs but that behavior seems to have dropped off since the addition of the second box.

His new thing is to walk up to the clean or slightly used box and urinate right in front of it on the floor.

Both boxes are covered types so I removed the tops to see if this had any effect. It did not.

After he urinates I scrub the area down with bleach killing all odor and wait for it to completely dry before allowing any cat to return. Older female and male have no problems and never "miss"

I placed a rubber mat around the box the kind that is in front of your door so that the litter would get stock on it but he just pees on that too. Now iI have removed that and the box sits on vinyl floor.

I have used Dr Elsey's Litter attractant to no measurable influence on him.

I have watched him walk to the box and walk away to a heavy mat that is sitting in front of a near by door that leads outside and he will lye down and scratch and then urinate on the mat. I have cleaned that mat with bleach as well.

Vet says there is no medical reason for this.

Any suggestions?

I took this cat in for a friend that was dying of cancer and his dying wish was that the cat would be treated like family but never disclosed to me that the cat had any quirks or problems. I'm disgusted with this cat.
 

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Peeing right in front of the box is an obvious territory marking. He's saying "this box is MINE."

Do the other cats use it or is it him alone? Also, he might be nervous of the box, if the 15 yo dominant cat is stalking him while he's doin' his business.

Hopefully someone can help you get passed this. Most cat "quirks" have very solid cat-reasoning behind them, and it's just our job to figure out what's causing the problems and fix them.
 

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Piddle Program | Hermitage Cat Shelter

Cats hate change. It is hard to tell if a cat is stressed. Usually the marking behavior is one of the signs! Another strike against him is he is declawed. Vets won’t tell you but one of the results of declawing is inappropriate marking.

I didn’t know how brutal declawing is and had my first cat declawed. When he is stressed he does pee on things. I’ve had him pee on the floor right in front of me to let me know how unhappy he was. I had way too many foster Kittens & cats at the time.

I would use Feliway plug in dispensers’ to help calm him down. Best to put them by the areas where he has peed. Make sure you use an enzyme cleaner to clean up his marked spots.

 

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Discussion Starter #13
Peeing right in front of the box is an obvious territory marking. He's saying "this box is MINE."

Do the other cats use it or is it him alone? Also, he might be nervous of the box, if the 15 yo dominant cat is stalking him while he's doin' his business.

Hopefully someone can help you get passed this. Most cat "quirks" have very solid cat-reasoning behind them, and it's just our job to figure out what's causing the problems and fix them.
The 15 year old has stopped all of the stalking and ignores the "new" cat. The 15 year old has his own food station that the others do not use. The female the ruler in the sense that if she approaches food the other two males let her come in and eat first. She is very passive in the sense that any new animal in the house she greets by rubbing and purring on them. Including the 35 pound dog.
Dog steers way clear of "new" cat that always greets dog with a hiss.
Vet checked for any blocking and said there is no reason for his behavior but he is a cat and they can be very quirky.
"New" cat is a little older and usually sits next to a human on the couch, never really see him "play" He likes sunning and sleeping and watching us humans go about our lives.

The plus is he uses the box to defecate and he must urinate into it some time because I have found no other soiled areas. He has never relieved himself under a bed but he did like throw rugs, or plastic grocery bags.
As my friend was dying he kept his box in a shower stall. It is possible that he could "miss" and no one would know the difference. I have seen him in the box urinating but not squatting, so the urine just hits the surrounding wall.
 

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If I did not mention he is declawed and neutered.
He has been that way for a long time.
 

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Also just cleaning with bleach does not eliminate the odor from the cat's standpoint. You will need an enzyme cleaner for that like Simple Solution or Nature's Miracle.
 

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What food (brand and dry or canned?) does he eat?

Please read this in its entirety: Feline Urinary Tract Health: Cystitis, Urethral Obstruction, Urinary Tract Infection by Lisa A. Pierson, DVM :: cat urinary tract health . Note that sometimes bloodwork and urinalysis will be "normal" but the cat can still have urinary tract issues.

I would (1) get the bloodwork and urinalysis done, but don't assume that there is no medical problem if they come back clean (and ignore the vet if he tries to put cat on "prescription" food); (2) get more litterboxes; (3) confine him to 1 room w/ 2 LBs (and plenty of attention) for a week or 2; and (4) and use Dr. Elsey's Cat Attact litter ( Cat Attract | Precious Cat Litter )for the next few months at least; and (5) switch all the cats to high quality carb-free CANNED food (such as EVO 95% meat formulae ( Healthy Pet Product Search ? Organic Dog Food, Dog Treats and More ? Natura Pet Products )).
 

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Female Vet. If the tests show nothing then how do I convince the vet that there is something wrong?

Dry food only - IAMS Proactive Health Digestive Care.

Have used Dr Elsey's for 2 months now. Appears to have no effect.
 

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My cat Sherlock had the same issue and he ended up having a urinary blockage and almost dying. I switched him to 95% wet food (not 100% because my husband gets home before I do sometimes and is too lazy to feed him wet) and he hasn't had problems in over 2 months. My vet didn't find anything wrong either, thought it was stress related due to our recent move and loud roofers on the ceiling. He has no issues with urinating outside the box now. Every cat is different, but maybe you should try switching to wet and see what happens.
 

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Female Vet. If the tests show nothing then how do I convince the vet that there is something wrong?
You don't. You just switch to canned carb-free food (READ THE ARTICLE!), which you should do regardless. But get the testing done b/c if there IS an infection it neesd to be treated. If crystals show up and the vet wants to put kitty on prescription food, you can just decline.
Dry food only - IAMS Proactive Health Digestive Care.
Honestly, more than likely this is your main problem. Read the article.
 
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