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Discussion Starter #1
I have a pretty, neutered female cat (Dub) and she has a small garden, which she can get to by using a cat flap...well, the other day my partner was upstairs in the office with Dub asleep next to him and he saw this movement out of the corner of his eye, so he looked over and saw this massive grey and white tom looking at him...my partner got up, and the tom turned around and non-chalantly trotted down the stairs and back out...but he had eaten all Dub's food before he came out, and he gave my partner a smug look when he was back outside, like he'd be back.

Any tips? We currently have the cat flap set to "in-only", and water at the ready but if anyone has a better idea I would love to know it...
 

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Well, if you want to keep him as a pet, I would let him have his freedom to enter and live the house. Leave food, water and possibly a bed near it and soon enough, he may just decide to stay. If you would like to find a home for him, then that sounds just about right.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ta for the reply, but I think he has an owner, he's just eating other cat's food and claiming her territory, so no, I want him out, she's scared to go in the garden and the only reason I pay this extortionate rent is for her to have access to the outside, so I def want him out! :wink:
 

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At my parents, we have a Tom cat named "Big Gray" that helps him self to our kitchen table!!!! He just comes right through the cat door like he owns the place and goes downstairs too, to eat the cat food. He is kinda mean so we are always scared to coax him out. I guess he's not a stray since he lives on the next street over. I like that my cats can come and go and I like that other cats like my house so much that they'll come in. It's funny and harmless and my girl cat is fixed. We don't have much problems with Big Gray and welcome him in, especially if he looks cold.
 

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Okay no one really seems to be helping with your problem -- just encouraging you to let him keep coming in. I personally wouldn't like this either -- I think people aren't paying attention to the part about him scaring your cat and traumatizing her in her own home. You said he had an owner -- that should be enough. If he was a poor stray looking for a home, I'd say contact a no-kill shelter around you, but he has a home and a place to eat, so you made it sound.

When you say you have "water at the ready" does that mean that you have a waterbottle to squirt him when he comes in? This may or may not work -- chances are if he is bold enough to enter another's home then he is bold enough to not care about a little water spritz. I think that the thing to do is talk to his owners. I don't know where you live, but here there are laws against having your cats roam on other people's property. Here it is illegal for your cat to be off your property without a leash, and the way I understood it, it was like that in most states. I would check out the law where you are about this. If it's in fact, illegal -- then approach the owner of this cat and inform them of what's going on, and that it's against the law. If it's *not* against the law where you are, then I'd talk to the owner anyway and stress to them that you are not happy with this and want it to stop. It might be enough for them to get a running line for their cat so it could still be outside, but not enter other people's homes and eat their cat food. If none of this works, I'd try putting the catfood outside for him, and then eventually putting it further and further away from your home.

PS -- I hate this too -- it irritates me. I love cats to death and I want every one that I see, but my neighbor used to let all her cats outside without a leash, and they would come over into our yard and poop in our sandbox. This is so inconsiderate and rude of the owner -- cat poop can be fatal to kids and is obviously not something you want floating around in your yard where children play, or in their sandbox. My mom was too shy to talk to her so I did. Because it was illegal of her and I told her that we'd call animal control if she didn't keep better track of them.
 

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Heather102180 said:
At my parents, we have a Tom cat named "Big Gray" that helps him self to our kitchen table!!!! He just comes right through the cat door like he owns the place and goes downstairs too, to eat the cat food. He is kinda mean so we are always scared to coax him out. I guess he's not a stray since he lives on the next street over. I like that my cats can come and go and I like that other cats like my house so much that they'll come in. It's funny and harmless and my girl cat is fixed. We don't have much problems with Big Gray and welcome him in, especially if he looks cold.
You need to know more than whether or not they've had their shots -- cats can do many many things to each other even with the help of vaccinations. I personally would not risk it with my cats. I don't trust my neighbor that I don't know that well when they tell me "yeah yeah they don't have FIV, and they have all their shots." I'm not willing to put my cat's health or well-being on the word of someone else.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ok....

Right, thank you for some more replies, all helpful...but, I live in the UK and here it is considered cruel to lock cats in, in fact the RSPCA (UK equivalent of ASPCA) will not rehome a cat in home without a garden. I can see why the US has different laws though, as there are more cars, and less gardens in urban areas etc.

However, where I live it's fine for cats to be out in anyone's gardens, and there are over 60 cats in the 40 gardens my house backs on to...so knowing who this cat belongs to is not an option...

This tom could also be from several streets away as toms typically roam a larger territory, especially if he's unneutered. And the terror came back last night, while we were asleep, and helped himself to all Dub's food, and left huge muddy prints everywhere...this cat is enormous!

When I say water at the ready, I mean lots of, I was hoping if he had a not so brilliant experience in the house for a change he might not bother coming back...but I don't want to be mean or stress him...

argh
 

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Okay -- my plan fails then. *curses* ;)

Okay -- plan B. I hate to say it, but I don't think that all the cutesy training techniques for keeping cats away from places will work on this cat -- he sounds pretty bound and determined to make your house his house. I don't think that the unattractive scents will bother him, plus it might bother YOUR cat. Is it possible to set your cat door so that it cannot open for a while -- until he is deterred from coming around? And trying to use a can of coins or make loud noises whenever he comes around to *try* and get in so that he associates your place with bad things? Or maybe you could be sure to feed Dub at certain times of the day and then when it's not feeding time, put the food away, so there is nothing for the tom cat to get into and eventually he realizes this and hopefully stays away. I am running out of ideas but I am trying to help. This thought of this situation happening to me completely irritates me.

I wouldn't worry about stressing him with the water -- he's obviously a ballsy cat, and after all...he is in fact stressing YOUR cat by invading. It just might work -- I would definitely try it.

My last-ditch effort is trying to contact drjean on this forum and lead her to this thread. She is great and seems to know everything. She seems to say very often that you need to get creative with cats. I think she'd be the best one to help you with this.
 

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It is not against the law in PA and most other states for a cat to be outside without a leash. My cats are not allowed outside because of the dangers, the road, etc. I think it would be best for you to lock the flap until you can have a friendly talk with the owner. My guess is that she will be embarassed, for fear you think she's not giving the cat enought to eat. She might not know, in fact, it would be unusual for her to know, that her cat is in someone else's house. It's nice that your cat has a way in and out, but I think you'll have to lock it for now. Her cat must be very sure of itself. Many cats would be too frightened to enter a stranger's house-or very hungry. I know it's a delicate situation. We all like to be friendly neighbors.

Although it seems to be a common way to correct an animal's bad habits, I personally would not spray an animal with water. And, in this case, you might be dealing with a cat who has no other source for food. There are so many unwanted and starving strays. The neighborhood children can probably tell you. They play outside a lot, and often know who owns which animal. I wish you the very best.
 

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Jeanie said:
It is not against the law in PA and most other states for a cat to be outside wihtout a leash. My cats are not allowed outside because of the dangers, the road, etc. I think it would be best for you to lock the flap until you can have a friendly talk with the owner. My guess is that she will be embarassed, for fear you think she's not giving the cat enought to eat. She might not know, in fact, it would be unusual for her to know, that her cat is in someone else's house. It's nice that your cat has a way in and out, but I think you'll have to lock it for now. Her cat must be very sure of itself. Many cats would be too frightened to enter a stranger's house-or very hungry. I know it's a delicate situation. We all like to be friendly neighbors.
I was talking about "off your property" unattended and without a leash -- not simply outside. And this girl said that she has no idea who the owner is and finding out is pretty impossible, so I guess that won't work.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Jeanie said:
It is not against the law in PA and most other states for a cat to be outside wihtout a leash. My cats are not allowed outside because of the dangers, the road, etc. I think it would be best for you to lock the flap until you can have a friendly talk with the owner. My guess is that she will be embarassed, for fear you think she's not giving the cat enought to eat. She might not know, in fact, it would be unusual for her to know, that her cat is in someone else's house. It's nice that your cat has a way in and out, but I think you'll have to lock it for now. Her cat must be very sure of itself. Many cats would be too frightened to enter a stranger's house-or very hungry. I know it's a delicate situation. We all like to be friendly neighbors.
Thank you for all your help, you people are truly lovely. But as I said earlier, the chances if me linking the cat to an owner is slim, he could be from a few streets away, and I live in the middle of a city, I barely know my immediate neighbours...

I don't want to lock the cat flap as Dub will interpet this as a punishment on her, and the last thing I want to do is make her feel any more timid than she already does. Furthermore, she needs to go outside to mark her territory or else we'll have 60 cats in and out at all times. As a former stray, she is feisty, but I think this cat is half-dog, and I don't blame her for giving in.

I think I'll take some of the tips from Jazz like not leaving her food down and see how I get on... :lol:
 

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If that doesn't work -- send a PM to drjean. She's awesome!! She's like the kitty angel or something -- she knows everything.
 

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I think Dr. Jean will advise a no-kill shelter. I hope he finds a home. Often, it is only kittens who get homes, and small budgets demand the euthanizing of strays who have been there too long. I empathize with you, but my heart breaks for unwanted animals. I hope you didn't think I was treating your post lightly. I had this happen to me, and did care for the animals, and find them homes. It was not a joke.

ForJazz, to clarify my post, this is typical of the leash laws in most communities:

(1) No person shall permit any animal other than a cat to go at large upon any street, public place or private property other than the property of the owner of the animal. All animals using any street, public place or private property of anyone other than the owner of the animal shall be on a leash not exceeding six (6) feet in length including the handgrip but excluding the collar and accompanied by a person able to fully control the animal at all times.

Obviously, there are exceptions. Local ordinances vary.
 

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In the UK do they sell cat flaps that have a sensor that prevents other cats from coming in? It works bu your cat wearing a collar with sort of a "garage door opener" that unlocks the flap. The flap locks again once the cat exits or enters. Others cats then can't get in. I think that would be the ideal way of dealing with this but I'm not sure if they sell that product where you live...
 

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don't worry, he is most certainly a loved cat, but he is also a bully! and I didn't think you were treating my post with anything but sincerity, and I thank you for it.
 

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queen of the nile said:
In the UK do they sell cat flaps that have a sensor that prevents other cats from coming in? It works bu your cat wearing a collar with sort of a "garage door opener" that unlocks the flap. The flap locks again once the cat exits or enters. Others cats then can't get in. I think that would be the ideal way of dealing with this but I'm not sure if they sell that product where you live...
yes they do, but I don't like them either because if the cat loses their collar while they're out then they're stuck outside for a while, and the sensor is very chunky and awkward :wink:
 

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Jeanie said:
I think Dr. Jean will advise a no-kill shelter. I hope he finds a home. Often, it is only kittens who get homes, and small budgets demand the euthanizing of strays who have been there too long. I empathize with you, but my heart breaks for unwanted animals. I hope you didn't think I was treating your post lightly. I had this happen to me, and did care for the animals, and find them homes. It was not a joke.

ForJazz, to clarify my post, this is typical of the leash laws in most communities:

(1) No person shall permit any animal other than a cat to go at large upon any street, public place or private property other than the property of the owner of the animal. All animals using any street, public place or private property of anyone other than the owner of the animal shall be on a leash not exceeding six (6) feet in length including the handgrip but excluding the collar and accompanied by a person able to fully control the animal at all times.

Obviously, there are exceptions. Local ordinances vary.
I think you are right -- it's mostly dogs that this law pertains to. I agree with the humane society of the United States and their statement about free-roaming cats. I feel like it's sad and irresponsible that this law is not implemented in more areas. Their point that I agree with most is that it is hard for feral rescue societies, and feral control groups, to tell the difference between a feral cat, or a cat who is allowed to roam, is owned, and is just scared to be approached when out of the home. This can be a bad situation. There are feral control groups around here whose aim is not to catch feral cats and put them to sleep, but to simply have them altered so as to try and help the overpopulation problem. Some are caught and socialized if they are willing -- if they are not then they are simply altered and then re-released. But the problem arises when free-roaming cats are mistaken for strays. A free-roaming owned cat could be taken to a shelter, and its owner would go thinking that it's lost or dead. I wonder how often this happens.

I think it is fine for cats to be let outside for good reason -- if your cat has a great desire, or if you want them to experience it, etc -- as long as they are supervised, or kept in a confined area, for their own safety. Also because it's not fair to hold all cats to the same standard. Sure - one cat could be a perfect angel, only defecate on THEIR property, and not harm a soul or go into anyone else's home. But what about the cat that contaminates a children's sandbox (innocently of course) and a child has to be rushed to the emergency room because of it? What about the cat that wanders into a children's play area, the kids run over and corners it because it wants to play with the cute furry thing, and get scratched up because they scared the cat? What if that child has hemophilia and bleeds to death? A delicate immune system that cannot fight infection? I don't think that people without cats should have to live with them -- everyone has that right, and some people have great reason not to. I personally just believe that keeping tabs on your cat when outdoors is what a responsible, informed cat owner should do. Here is the humane society's statement if anyone is interested. http://www.hsus.org/ace/11857
 

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queen of the nile said:
In the UK do they sell cat flaps that have a sensor that prevents other cats from coming in? It works bu your cat wearing a collar with sort of a "garage door opener" that unlocks the flap. The flap locks again once the cat exits or enters. Others cats then can't get in. I think that would be the ideal way of dealing with this but I'm not sure if they sell that product where you live...
That's a great invention!!
 
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