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Discussion Starter #1
I need some help with a translation. I am looking for the command form of "live, laugh, love." Free translations online stink -- I'm looking for someone who knows the language. Not an "I" form or a "you" form or even "they" or "we." I'm looking for the command conjugation. Thank you so much to anyone who can help. :)
 

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Bah. We just learned imperetives a few weeks ago, but a couple of those are irregular verbs. I'm not that good yet. :D I'm sorry!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
aphrodeia said:
Bah. We just learned imperetives a few weeks ago, but a couple of those are irregular verbs. I'm not that good yet. :D I'm sorry!
OOoooh but could you email your professor? Pretty please? *knows absolutely no French*
 

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I could call my dad... as french is his first language, but he tends to have HORRIBLE grammer and uses a LOT of slang, which means you'd probably get a more accurate answer from the online translator.

I actually caught him saying "movez le char" once... I knew what he meant, but HONESTLY! (He was telling my step-mom to move the car...) That one phrase has kinda made his "french" a family joke.

Good luck though :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, if you happen to call him anyway it wouldn't hurt to try...I'd be interested to see what he had to say. ;)
 

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What are the circumstances that you are planning to use this? It can make a difference in the way you address yourself. French people are overly polite and they often use the plural form, that is non-existent in the English language as the same form (you'd have to translate by emphasizing it differently)

The Imperative mode of the verbs Vivre, Rire, and Aimer are:

-singular ("tu"=you) - "Vis, ris, aimes!"
-plural ("vous"=you -y'all : )) - " Vivez, riez, aimez!"

You might also be able to use different variations such as the "IL FAUT QUE" structure used to introduce the Subjunctive Mode

-sg. - "Il faut que tu vives, ries, aimes."
-pl. - "Il faut que vous vivies, riiez, aimez."
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Oh ioana you are a life saver! I want to use it because I am helping my sister decorate her house. She is decorating her kitchen in a french theme and her foyer in a Tuscan one. So in her kitchen she wanted me to do some calligraphy on one of the walls that said something nice in French that would say something about her home and family, and be welcoming to guests. Does that help? Maybe the vous form? I'm not sure when the last one you mentioned would be appropriate, so just let me know. :)
 

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Oh, gosh, you guys, you make me blush,
You are too kind, aphrodeia.
You are more than welcome. It's been a while since I 've had to use French so I enjoy the challenege.
The explanation helps tremendously. I love the idea of decorating in French + Tuscan manner and adding these accents.
You are correct, the last form is a bit too strong.
Right now,

" Vivez, riez, aimez!"

sounds best.

But let me know what the deadline is, I am going to pick my brain and see if I can come up with something else.

The idea of "stomachi affamati" from the "Italian post" is so funny.

By the way, you could use
"Vivez bien, riez souvent, aimez beaucoup "
that is used in wise decor
It traslates to: "live well, laugh often, love much"

Again, the more ideas you give me about what you want, the more inspired I am, or anyone else attempting to translate for that matter.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Seriously, you have warmed my heart. I can't really describe how much this means to me in words, but my eyes are welled up with tears right now. I'll give her the idea that you had -- I personally like it better. We just want something that when people as "what does that mean?" we will feel like we are describing our well-wishes for anyone that enters the home. The "hungry stomachs" was my idea, since my sister loves to cook and is a wonderful hostess. She loves having guests and making them feel at home.

The deadline is tomorrow, Sunday...as she will be back from a trip and we are planning on decorating the foyer and finishing up the kitchen.
 

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The pleasure is mine, Julie! (((hugs))) !
That is so sweet of you to put so much heart into this project. I know you'll say it is the natural thing to do , but it is wonderful of you nontheless.
Indeed, the last suggestion sounds the best.
"Vivez bien, riez souvent, aimez beaucoup "

It sounds like a lot of work ahead of you guys, but I know that it will pay off in the end to pay attention to what only seem like small details.
Just an example - my aunt has a plate holder that says "pomo d'oro" and has a tomatoe on it. It really makes me think of Tuscany's ondulating hills, with ripe tomatoes and gorgeous vines. I 'd love to go visit there one day.
I think these two accents are going to brighten up tremendously and , make guests feel really comfortable in your sister's home.

What colors are you going to go for?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
That plate sounds adorable. Now you are giving me ideas for her birthday present -- maybe I can make her some ceramic plates! :)

The kitchen is really neat but hard to describe the color. Maybe I should take pics when I'm done. Anyway -- it's a really difficult room because the kitchen actually connects with the living room. It is a very large and long space, with kitchen on one side, dinette in the middle, and then the living room on the other end with a fireplace which she painted a whitish color. So we painted the entire space a light forrest green with a bit of a grey hue. The ceiling is a lighter color of that. She painted the cupboards a whitish color, and they are distressed with copper hardware. She put frosted glass fronts on the cupboards instead of the wood. The island in the kitchen is the same distressed white wood, with a greyish granite top. She also has a large pantry that she painted with "chalkboard" paint so that the kids can draw on it or she can write reminders on there. She wants the italian saying to go over that.

We are making the foyer hopefully look like a street corner in a little village. We started with a yellowish/gold base color on the walls. It's a nice space -- it's open on the bottom and the stairs to the upper level come out and create a kind of "balconey." So my sister found some ornate copper panels at a scrap yard, and I think we are going to hang them from curtain rods with fishing wire against the walls. There is one window up there, and I think we'll do a single drape of fabric from one side to another. I would also like to help her create two matching pieces of art -- perhaps a fabric peice in golds and reds, or an abstract acrylic painting with eclectic squares on it and some curly details. She has a single bench at the bottom of the stairs where people can take their shoes off -- and there are some pretty hooks hanging there as well. That's where we were going to put the french saying.

...or perhaps we should say the stomach thing in french and the other thing in Italian....oh no. :oops:
 

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No, no do it the way you had it planned. I am sure that is the best way.
We'll figure it out. I really think there's no comma after "and"("e")

"Benvenuti amici, famiglia e stomachi affamati!"

Here is a link to more wise decor in Italian
(actually French and Spanish as well)

http://www.wisedecor.com/decor/customer ... hp?cat=338

It would be nice if in the area where you have the French saying you could add some artwork French Bistro style. Even if you just add utensils that represent that part of French culture.

When I think of French kitchen decorating - black and white comes to mind, chef with a moustache haha, something like this:



And then this French kitchen as an example

.

I also imagine entering the "boulangerie" and smelling the divine croissants, mmm yum!
Both cultures have a lot of warmth so I see light yellow and green too.
This plate holder I was mentioning is yellow background with ripe tomatoe on it.
Specifically Italian kitchen makes me think of old looking potery - again warmth, yellow, a little red



I know, I really got carried away but you hit a soft spot with French and Italian style decorating. Coincidentally, I have been looking online art pieces and accessories related to these two cultures. Whimsical art has grown on me. It is light and fun!
-chefs, cats and cows art are among my favourites themes:


I particularly like Rob Scotton's cows to put in a bathroom..they are so funny to me




The last three pictures are from:
http://www.allposters.com/gallery.asp?C ... 18378B4841
 

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Discussion Starter #14
It's funny you should mention that -- because my sister just ordered a series of three "chefs on bicycles" prints for that room! :lol: I love all of the things you have posted -- especially that shot of the range. (I love the kitty too). The window treatments in the kitchen/dinette/living area are going to be coppery. The foyer is going to be full of reds, golds, and yellows. :) There are also two open rooms that connect the foyer to the kitchen, and we will be painting one of those red, and one of them a pumpkin color. Hopefully they will all look good together. :)

So...you think that Italian comma rules are different than English in that respect? I'll have to trust you on that one, because to me it just looks funny without that second comma. I'll let her know.
 

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The comma rules are always hard to tell, because even in English, that comma before the "and" is optional. I believe it's the AP style to have the comma, but omitting it is acceptable.

Or something. :lol:

I'm really digging this thread... what neat pictures.

HOORAY for language geekery! I'm ashamed to say that I've just bailed on French - I'm not happy with how it's taught at my university, it was much harder than it needed to be - but I'm picking up German for the rest of the year. Going for Italian next year, and I'm looking forward to it!
 

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You are right about the comma rule in the English language, aphrodeia.
You have really got me started, Julie and I have tried to find out exactly about the comma but had no luck so far. I did read that the punctuation rules are similar between these two languages, Italian and English, so I don't think you could go wrong either way.


I really like this thread a lot too. It's not only been challenging me but also fun. How awkward about the chefs on the bikes pictures...your sister and I have similar taste.

Anyway, if you can, Julie do take pictures when you get done with all of your projects! I am sure it is going to look fantastic .

What level of French are you at right now, Aphrodeia?
I used to teach French and English in Romania. It was basic and not very complicated at all, just 2nd through 8th grade.
All the kids hated French but loved English.
 

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I finished my first two university French courses, just learned about the imperative. Subjunctive was a few weeks ago.

The classes here are meant to be 'immersive', which is wonderful if you're in the country or otherwise surrounded by native speakers who know what they're doing. When in the classroom for only 3 hours a week, surrounded by students who can't pronounce a darn thing, it's a mess. "Je regarde" becomes "J'ai regardé", and they don't always get corrected. Terribly confusing. So even though I really enjoy the language, I'm just frustrated.

So, back to German with me. I did two years of German in high school and I've always really loved the language. I'm going to Austria in July, so I hope to advance my skills enough to get by.
 

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I am assuming that French is not one of your majors. When I was in university we were corrected at the smallest details. We had to work the "r" and all that. We had French teachers as well. It paid off tremendously. The mistake that you've used as example is common among Romanian highschool students and all the same with university students that don't have foreign languages as their majors.
It is a shame that you can't learn it the proper way.
We had an extraordinary good teacher when I first started, in the 5th grade. And then later in highschool, our classroom principal was an amazing lady. I've always had a calling towards languages, and at times, learned on my own, when we had teachers that didn't do their jobs well. But I know that those two teachers made a world of a difference. I had the will , but without the guidance, especially in the first stages, you can get confused.
I hope your German class will go better.
How fun to go to Osterreich, mm yum schnitzel and great culture. I know, I started with the food, but gotta have a happy stomach haha
What city are you going to?
 

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There's a French major at the university, and I assume that the later classes need to clean up the messes left by the earlier ones. I don't have a problem with pronunciation, generally - I've taken diction classes as part of my music major - but hearing all the errors was frustrating (and a little annoying).

I'll be going to Graz for seven weeks, and I'm very excited. :D Will be there with an opera program, so I'll be busy, but it's worth it. People tell me it's a lovely city to be in, and I'm looking forward to visiting many cities on the weekends.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I'm jealous, aphrodeia -- I'd love to go to Germany. My dad spent a lot of time there when he was in the army, and he has wonderful stories about it. To this day, nothing gets my dad going more than asking you to show him his Germany pictures. ;)

I really liked the languages that I learned. I went to a catholic grade school where they taught us German for one semester and Spanish for the other. So that was the jumping off point. In high school I had the best teacher EVER -- Mrs. Kastner. We started at the beginning but we moved pretty fast. I was lucky enough to have her for Spanish 3 and Spanish 5. I couldn't tell you who I had for the other years -- don't remember, and that's sad.

But anyway -- Mrs. Kastner's class was always so much fun. We learned by the book, but she was sooo energetic and hilarious that everyone paid attention to every minute, because you wanted to see what she was going to do next. She not only taught us the basics, but sarcasm and silly words -- since that is such a big part of American culture and she thought it would be more interesting to us that way. She was right. We got together in groups and made videos often -- not only was that so much fun, but it got us to do our homework and really practice using the language in a normal setting. You also wanted to know what you were doing when we watched the videos in class -- because you didn't want to be the only one in the class not laughing at the funny parts. We had culture days and immersion days, and on those we were only allowed to speak Spanish, and everyone had to find a spanish recipe, make it, and bring it to class. I won a jalapeno eating contest once. She didn't let you get by with excuses like "I can't" or "I don't know that" -- she worked everyone in the class so that we would all do well. We watched spanish movies without subtitles and had to discuss and/or take tests on them afterwards. By the end of my high school career I felt like I would have been more than fine on a trip to a spanish-speaking country.

My Italian teacher for my first year was a young guy who had majored in Italian and traveled all over Italy. He knew what he was doing, and his stories about the culture and the different places in Italy made everything come together well.
 
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