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We are thinking about getting a cat and have 3 young kids. Our last pet was a non purebred cat and he had chronic bladder disease and was on meds for most of his life, never used his litter box 100% of the time and just didn't have the best life although he lived to be 17 years old. We are thinking about getting a purebred this time so the cat will be healthier. But is this true? Are purebreds healthier?
 

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I'm not sure that purebreds and moggies can be compared quite like that. It really depends on the individual cat. But let me just throw some information out there for you.

All breeds of cats have inherent strengths and weaknesses. If a cat is well-bred, the strengths of the breed will stand out and you will have a great cat. If a cat is poorly-bred, the weaknesses will come out and you will have a sickly cat.

Now with moggies you don't have quite the same problem because you won't have the inherent strengths and weaknesses. In general, a moggie will be less prone to genetic diseases.

But there's a lot more than genetics that determines if your cat is going to be healthy. There's also the sort of food you feed them and the environment in which they live. You can find a lot of information about food in the Health & Nutrition forums here at Cat Forum.

I think environment might be the biggest factor for you since your children are young. When looking for a cat, always ask if the cat you are interested in will be good with young children. And, of course, supervise your children while they are with the cat.

If you decide to go with a pure breed, make sure you go to a reputable breeder. Never buy a cat from a pet store. Depending on the breed you want, you might even be able to find a rescue. The rescue should have all kinds of information on each cat so you can find one that will be a good match for your family.

If you decide a moggie will be best with your family, there are plenty who need good homes. Check out Petfinder.com to see homeless cats in your area.

Good luck and welcome to the forum!
 

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I've often heard and been told that purebreds are less healthy only because--as with any animal that is purebred--they are more prone to illness/diseases and complications that come along with specific breeds. This goes along with what Annissa said, so I guess there's truth to it.
 

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Purebred cats that have been inbred will have the very best and very worst genes in that line. However, if the breeders know what they're doing, they will not breed a problem to a problem. They have access to the pedigrees and they know what they're getting in a litter. (Nature can always come up with surprises, but not as likely with a breeder who's knowledgable) The buyer should ask many questions, and insist on a health report. Obviously you would not want to get a Siamese kitten with crossed eyes or a Persian with chronic runny eyes or nose. However, in my opinion, those problems are a result of bad breeding. Know whom you're dealing with, and never buy from a pet store or a kitty or puppy mill! Find a reputable breeder whose motive to breed is to improve the health and overall good of the breed. (cats or dogs)

With DSH or DLH, you have no idea what the background of the tom and queen is. Littermates will often breed, especially if there's a colony of barn cats. That's not good! I have had moggies with great personalities and health, and I've had moggies with birth defects--internal defects. :(

Often, people will tell people not to buy a German Shepherd dog, for example, because hip displasia is common to the breed. That's not entirely true. All large dogs are more likely to have that problem than a lap dog. It depends on where you're getting the information, whether it's a cat or dog. Read what you can, and know the disposition and common health problems of the cat or dog.

Buy sensibly and buy the one you love, who seems to love you! :) Good luck!
 

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i've never owned a purebred cat in my life and all of our cats have been very healthy (and we've had up to 10 at a time, usually when one has a litter before we could get mom spayed) the only problem i can think of is our cat Teddy got cancer but he was REALLY old, at least 15 or more, so rather than putting him through all the stress of treatment and whatnot, because he was in severe pain, we just put him down.
 

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I'm not so sure about Cats but I feel it might be the same thing as someone has said earlier that Purebred can have a tendency to weaker health because of the crossing heritages of the cats they are breeding.

In my experiance with Dogs this is DEFINATELY the case all of our Purebreds have had a lot more vet visits then any of our mutts did. We've been through about 13 dogs in my family.

IMO I feel safer with a lil mix in my pets.
 

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I'm not sure if either is healthier. All my cats are not pure breed. The oldest being 9 1/2 years. I haven't had any health issues with any of them.
 

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:lol: Is "moggie" the feline form of "mongrel"?

I've got six mutt cats right now and a Tonkinese. We've only had two problem cats, ever. The first was our first Tonkinese, who was actually healthy until he developed an incurable bloodclot at 9 years old and had to be euthanized (it cut off his circulation). Now we have a orange/white DSH from the HS who suffered kidney failure at the rip old age of 1 (yes, one). He barely pulled through and has lived the last 4 years with 25% usage of his kidneys.

My mutt dog is getting close to 9 and has never had a single health problem. Our Labrador had two dozen of them (well, maybe only one dozen). He was from a disgusting excuse of a breeder, though.

So. If you want a purebred, go to a very, very good breeder. Otherwise, take your chances at the shelter. Since you've already had bad luck, I think the chances are good you'll have better luck next time.
 

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Oh, my! MONGREL? Did you mean Heinz 57? :wink: Moggie is a British term for DSH and DLH which this forum has picked up on. It's so much more personal than DSH or alley cat. It's handy, isn't it?
 

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So it's basically the same thing, right? A kitty of unknown heritage? *shrugs* "moggie" just seemed to not only mean the same, but also like a derivative of "mongrel." I didn't mean it as an insult. I don't mind the term mongrel (used in its true sense), and I love the term Mutt - and am proud to call my doggie such ;)
 

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K :lol: Some people are offended by "mongrel" or "mutt," and others use them as insults, so I was just checking :lol:
 
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