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Discussion Starter #1
I read it's not recommended to feed my cat raw pork meat because of a dangerous bacteria potentially living in it which causes almost immediate death. It's called Aujeszky's disease or pseudorabies.

I´ve been trying to get some more info and read the gouvernment has been trying to exterminate all animals that carried the bacteria. The article was almost 2 years old. Is this bacteria still around posing a threat to my kitten or is it safe to feed him pork meat nowadays?
 

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I'm increasing the amount of pork I feed to try save money. IMO it is just fine to feed. Very very few times will pork be infected with it.

I try to freeze pork three weeks before feeding but sometimes will feed it without freezing.
 

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Where do you live? I don't know of it being a problem in the USA but I wouldn't know about other countries. I feed pork regularly and have not had problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I live in Thailand now and there's no way I'm gonna get any info about it here.

I don't believe freezing meat kills the bacteria in it...
 

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I live in northern MN, and my vet has told me that local pork is safe, but pork from the southern part of the state is still at risk of pseudorabies infection. It would be advisable to check with your local vets or appropriate govt agencies to find out if pseudorabies is present in the area from which you procure your pork.

Laurie
 

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It is NOT a threat at all in the U.S. but potentially is abroad. I don't know about Thailand, but I would be careful if I were you. Perhaps skip pork. . .
 

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I would be very careful about pork there has been a long long history of infected meat world wide that i believe is a parasite not bacteria. I don't know how much we should believe what the government calms they have been wrong before about things that they were sure about. Cooking kills it, freezing might. Incidentally I will not feed pork out of an abundants of caution.
Wizzel
 

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From everything I've read, it seems this is a herpes virus limited to infecting swine.
I doubt infected animals would even reach slaughter, at least certainly not in countries who practice strict slaughter requirements of their animals; meaning no 'downers' or animals exhibiting clinical signs of illness or neurological problems are slaughterable for consumption.

http://www.pigprogress.net/health-diseases/a/aujeszkys-disease-pseudorabies-8.html
Aujeszky's disease is caused by infection with a herpes virus, Suid herpesvirus 1 (SHV) which multiplies in the nuclei of the cells of the pig to lyse (kill) them, to form syncytia (merge them) or to produce a characteristic intranuclear inclusion body. It can be grown in tissue culture in the laboratory. It is a DNA virus. The glycoproteins (gp) and thymidine kinase (TK) of the virus are important in the disease, in vaccines and in diagnosis and their genes have been sequenced. Only one major antigenic type of the virus occurs. Aujeszky's disease virus infects the upper respiratory tract and virus travels along the cranial nerves and invades the brain. Strains found in Northern Ireland and Central Europe also produce pneumonia. Invasion of the uterus, maternal and foetal placentas and foetuses occurs and can cause abortion, foetal death, mummification and foetal resorption. The virus can be adsorbed onto the zona pellucida of embryos and can infect recipient sows in embryo transfer and may be shed in the semen for up to 10 days. Virus is shed from two days post-infection until 10-14 days post-infection in most cases and exceptionally until 19-20 days. Latent (undemonstrable) infections commonly develop.
 

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I think Wizzel is concerned about a trichonosis infection, caused by the parasite trichinella.

It's the same situation though. Trichinella is killed in pork when frozen:

Source: [url said:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20003740?itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum&ordinalpos=2[/url]]North American genotypes of Trichinella spiralis (T-1), Trichinella nativa (T-2), Trichinella pseudospiralis (T-4), Trichinella murrelli (T-5), and Trichinella T-6 were examined for susceptibility to freezing in pork using time-temperature combinations that have been proven to inactivate T. spiralis. Infections were established in 3-month-old pigs of mixed sex and breed by oral inoculation of 10,000 muscle larvae (ML) (all genotypes, rodent-derived ML), 20,000 ML (T-1, T-4, and T-5; cat-derived ML), or 30,000 ML (T-2 and T-6; cat-derived ML). Pigs were euthanized 60 days postinoculation. Muscles from the tongue, masseter muscles, diaphragm, triceps, hams, neck, rump, and loins were ground, pooled, and mixed to ensure even distribution of larvae. Samples (20 g) containing each Trichinella species, genotype, and source combination were placed in heat-sealable pouches, transferred to a constant temperature refrigerant bath, and maintained according to defined time and temperature combinations. Larvae recovered from cold-treated pork samples were inoculated into mice to determine infectivity. Results indicated that the time-temperature combinations known to render pork safe for T. spiralis are sufficient to inactivate T. nativa and T-6 (the freeze-resistant isolates), T. murrelli (the most common sylvatic species in the United States excluding Alaska), and T. pseudospiralis (a species that lacks a muscle nurse cell). These data close a gap in knowledge about the effectiveness of freezing for inactivating these parasites in pork and should alleviate concern about the safety of frozen pork products from the United States.
All commercial pork is frozen before sale, and I keep my meat frozen before I give it to Mak, so again it's of no concern.
 

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That is good to know about pork that freezing kills the little buggers tho i'm still not sure i would want to feed pork raw.....
 

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This was recently posted on the facebook group: raw feeding:

Someone tried to scare the bejeepers out of me with this a ways back. I did a
ton of research and found that Trichinella has been 99.9% erradicated in the US
pork supply and anything you buy that is intended for humans should be fine but
if you get some from a questionable source or from a wild boar, you can kill any
cysts that may be present by freezing the meat.
 

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wizzel said:
That is good to know about pork that freezing kills the little buggers tho i'm still not sure i would want to feed pork raw.....
Well, I've been feeding raw pork to 3 dogs and 3 cats for more than a year and they're all doing great. The 14,000 folks on the rawfeeding yahoo group have also reported no problems. ;)
 

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On trichinosis, it's important to know that freeze resistat trichinella has been found in wild animals so if you feed game... make sure it's been tested!

Pseudorabies has been eridicated from many countries many years ago, but check the status on this with the appropriate authority in your country.
 
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