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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 3 year old Rottweiler mix, Brit, that bites. She's very protective over her things and when she's eating her food, chewing on a bone, or if she's in her cage, you can't get near her or she'll bite you. When she's outside she runs after neighbors walking by because she thinks they shouldn't be on her territory. I've told my parents she can't be on her tie-out outside anymore, we have to take her out on a leash but they won't listen. She's bit over 10 people in her short life and recently she bit my mom twice.
Is there anything we can do to discipline her? Sometimes she's the sweetest dog in the world and she'll lay in your lap and rub up against you but other times it's like she's a whole different dog. My mom wants to get rid of her but we don't know anyone who's going to take a protective dog. She'd had to live in a family with no kids and no other dogs or cats. Logically the only solution is to put her to sleep. :cry: :cry: :cry:
 

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Have you ever taken her to a professional dog trainer? One that is experienced in working with aggressive dogs?

Once a dog starts biting it's best to work with a professional to ensure no one else gets hurt.
 

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The dog obviously hasn't accepted you as her leader. You need to find a professional dog trainer. It's not the dogs fault that she acts the way she does.

My advice is to get some professional help.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Oh I know, she's just protective over her things. Esp. her cage. If she's in it and you lean over it she'll start barking because it's her space and it makes her feel crowded. I can't blame her for that though. My brother thinks we should just get rid of the cage because it's one less thing for her to be protective over. She's such a sweetie sometimes though!!!
Oh and the last time she bit my mom was because my mom accidentally stepped on her foot so it was just my dog's way of defending herself.
We're prolly gonna check into the professional trainers, thanks for your help. I'd post pics of her when she was a puppy cuz she was ADORABLE but idk how...hehe
It also seems when she bites it's just a warning to get away because she has never broken skin before, it's just like a nip.
 

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It also seems when she bites it's just a warning to get away because she has never broken skin before, it's just like a nip.
It always starts out that way. People assume because the dog has never broken skin that it's OK. Or they make excuses as to why the dog bit in the first place. When a dog bites it is never right and should never be taken lightly.

I don't mean to sound harsh so please don't take it this way but I've seen too many people get hurt this way and too many dogs with the potential to make good companions be put to sleep because their owners never did anything.

A dog should not be possessive over her things. She has to understand that they are not hers per say but rather yours and you have the right to take them away without her growling or nipping. Whether it be her crate, her toys or her food dish. It sounds to me that you have not established the top dog role with her and she has taken it. A dog who does not have a dominate figure will assume that role and this is the outcome.

It sounds as though you love her very much and to have tolerated all that you have from her shows that you're just not looking to dump her off. If you decide to seek the help of a trainer, I wish you the best and hope that no one gets hurt in the meantime. I also hope that you can bring out the good dog that's inside of her and put her nastiness behind you.

Just a side note: Dog trainers are not only needed for "problem" dogs. A lot of well behaved dogs, big and small and their owners can learn a lot just from attending dog obedience. My dog, who is also a Rottweiler mix has benefited so much from class that we went back for a couple more and has completed three levels of obedience. It's a lot of fun so I encourage anyone with a dog to join.
 

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It is deffinately in the breed, but not always in size! I have the biggest galoots of dogs, but they would never hurt us. Now Max on the other hand could possible bite a stranger, but him and Susie are our Watch Dogs, so that's not a big problem.(Except with the delivery and pizza man....eesh!) Susie has only bitten me out of accident but never broken skin. Now, on the other hand, I've been bitten many times by small house dogs...expecially old ones! You've just gotta train them from puppyhood and let them know who's boss.
My dad trains our big hyper dogs pretty well. Susie, my lab/dalmation is the dominate dog in our "pack" and for awhile she was trying to be dominate over us, but my dad put a stop to it by holding her down on her side and not letting her up. He also will feed all the dogs first before her. Oops, sorry, rambling here! Anyways...

Just keep working with him by trainer or yourself. Rottweilers can be mean, so be careful and train 'em up good! :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
My dog may be a rottweiler mix but she's only about 50 or so pounds so she's a medium sized dog. We had SEVEN people over at my house visiting this week and my dog was an angel. Except for when my uncle decided to lean over her cage....*sigh*
My cousin was here and she works at a vet's office and said there's some dogs there that they call "cage dogs" because they're the sweetest dogs ever and they're playful and nice out of their cage but when u walk past the cage if they're in it they start barking and going crazy. She suggested we take away her cage for a little bit and see how that is.
Oh and Jessica, when you said "they make excuses as to why the dog bit in the first place" you're exactly right that's what my dad does! My mom and I both agreed he's just making excuses but he's like "oh it's not the dogs fault that she bit" pfffft that's not true, dogs shouldn't nip in the first place. (Don't worry Jessica, you didn't 'sound harsh' you were very helpful)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
She's 3 years old, she will be 4 in October. We've had her since she was 8 weeks old. She's like 55 lbs. and right now we're taking away her cage so she has one less thing to be aggressive over.
 
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