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On the 19th, my mother, her boyfriend, and I are moving from Las Vegas to Tennessee. I currently only have one pet, a rat named Simon, who we are taking with. We plan on getting a house with a lot of property. If the property has no barn, we will most likely build one.

I had cats when I was very young. They were outside kitties, and weren't home often. One day, they never came back. Apparently once one cat peed on our water heater, and it smelled the house up. Since, my mother has sworn off cats. I want a cat, and my mother says that's fine, as long as it's not in the house. I'm afraid to have an outside kitty, in case something eats it.

Would it be alright to get a kitten and keep it in a barn? I plan on having many other animals, such as a horse, pygmy goat, miniature horse, things like that... And also dogs. I'm a bit wary of the idea. Would the kitten get hurt by any big animals in the barn? Would it get too hot or cold? I would get things to help protect from the weather, but it wouldn't be like living in a house. If I have to, I won't get a kitten, but I really want one to love and spoil.

Any opinions would be greatly appreciated.

*Edit*
Is this in the right place? I know feral cats would do fine in a barn, but I want a cat I can pet and love. Behavioral, sorta? If not, I'm very sorry.
 

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If you can't keep the kitty inside the house, you really ought to let someone who can adopt it. Outdoor life is very hard on cats and they are much more likely to be killed than indoor cats. The average lifespan of an outdoor cats is something like 3 years, while indoor ctas live well over 10 years.

Just wait a few years and get a kitty that can live inside with you, and you can spoil it all the time. :D
 

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I'd recommend NOT creating a barn cat from a shelter kitten, it's just not fair to the kitten. What would you do if he/she got sick and needed to be kept indoors for health reasons? What will you do when the cat goes into its first heat and has to be kept closely confined and watched to prevent accidental kittens? If your mother is opposed to the cat being indoors, this may simply not be the right time in your life to adopt a kitten, and there's nothing wrong with that. What's most important is what's best for the cat in question. Almost everyone where I live has barn cats, and they usually don't get adequate social and medical attention.

Alternatively, you could start calling around and talk to any local organizations that deal wth feral cats, as often they have cats that they try to place specifically as barn cats...often older cats, partly socialized and in need of a permanent shelter, but not suitable for indoor/family life. You'd be helping a cat who needs it, and making her life better, instead of removing a kitten from a shelter and making it into a barn cat.

That would be my best suggestion. Do a good deed now for a cat who needs it, and defer the kitten until you're at a point in your life where you can call the shots about where it lives.
 

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Yes, there are actually a lot of "barn cats" that need good "homes" such as at your barn, to come and go as you please, but simply are not fit for indoor living. Please look into this. So you can give a barn kitty a good home instead of them being put to sleep.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, I'm actually trying to convince my mother to let me get an inside kitty. I'm using a lot of what I've read in this forum. ;) I don't know if it's working, though.

I'm not really sure about the barn cat though... It would be kept in the barn and not allowed outside, and I just don't think a feral cat would like that. And it would have to get along with my other animals. That's one of the main reasons I want a kitten. I need to get it used to dogs and horses and things... I'll definitely think about this idea, though.
 

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eert said:
I'm not really sure about the barn cat though... It would be kept in the barn and not allowed outside, and I just don't think a feral cat would like that. And it would have to get along with my other animals. That's one of the main reasons I want a kitten. I need to get it used to dogs and horses and things... I'll definitely think about this idea, though.
How will you keep the cat in the barn? Will all the other animals also stay inside? Cats are very talented at climbing, finding holes, etc. THere are barn cats that aren't feral, they just don't do well in a house. A lot of cats in shelters have histories with other animals. THere's no guarantee a kitten will get along with other animals, either.

The best place to spoil and love a cat is indoors, but only if all residents feel the same.
 

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Not to mention that acclimating a cat (or kitten) to other animals takes a huge amount of interactive time and effort and a lot of supervision. There's no guarantee that a kitten will do better with other animals than a grown cat, especially with the lack of supervision that living in a barn will provide. There's almost no way to keep a barn cat in the barn if it doesn't want to be there, even more so if he/she is unaltered. An unaltered barn cat almost guarantees an early litter of kittens.

Most of the barn cats I see have really poor social skills with humans, because there's just no way a barn cat can get the amount of time and attention that an indoor cat gets by default. Sometimes a shelter will receive a barn cat or family of barn cats who would be best suited to that life, and if you tell them that's what you're looking for, you might luck out.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I really want a cat, and I'm doing my best to find an idea that would work and keep the cat happy. It's hard, and I'm still not sure if I'd be able to make the ideas work. I, of course, wouldn't get the cat unless this was all resolved... I'm also trying to convince my mother to let me have a cat. Unfortunately, my mother and her boyfriend are both opposed to cats. As is my rat.

My mother says that the cat we had was female and spayed, but she had a habit of spraying. My mother says this isn't normal behavior. So I'm trying to get her by pointing out that if we got a cat, it most likely wouldn't be like this. I'm really hoping this works, because the barn idea doesn't seem very good.

I'm very glad I came on here and posted my idea instead of just assuming it would work. Thank you all very much. :D
 

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Eert, even if it turns out that owning a cat isn't in the cards at this point in your life, there are a lot of other ways to have cats in your life, and a lot of those ways will make you better prepared and informed when the time is right to become a cat owner.

Offer to catsit for a neighbor or friend while they're away for the weekend. Shelters always need volunteers to clean cages, feed, and socialize cats (and kittens!), and you will get a big education in evaluating and working with cats. Who knows, maybe doing some of this stuff might get your mom and her boyfriend to change their mind about you getting an indoor cat. And even if it doesn't, you'll be helping cats that need it and building a lot of knowledge that'll help you when the time comes (and it will) for you to be with a cat full-time. :D
 

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I have a barn cat, but not every cat is able to be a barn cat. Mine was raised in a barn and is very used to it, I actually tried to bring her inside but she wouldn't have any of that. Around where I live, there are many who have families of cats in their barns. Now, mine is very tame and has regular medical attention and will come out to me when I call her. She's a total sweetie and she walks through the garden with me everyday. I would look for a cat raised in a barn with other animals. Then, there wouldn't be a shock for the poor kitty. I prefer to have my kitties indoors, but some cats just don't go for it, lol. Also, I've found that my kitties tame down on the peeing after I've had them fixed.
 
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