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I heard somewhere that chicken wings shouldn't be fed every day so as to avoid too much calcium intake , but surely feral cats that have to fend for themselves eat bones every day when they catch birds/mice/rats etc??

I know that bird bones aren't as dense as mammal's, so what if the cat survives on mice/rats etc? Surely that's an even higher proportion bone than chicken?

Does anyone have any thoughts on this?

I'm not saying that the current raw theory is wrong. Is it just the ratio of meat to bone in the wing itself, and whole prey items help address this?
Anyone?
 

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Cats aren't eating a chicken wing every day in the wild. They eat different things that they catch with different bone ratios. Even within a chicken there are different bone ratios between a wing and a thigh if you ground them up.

You will know if your cat is getting too much calcium...he/she will become constipated.
 

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Take note that cats that hunt in the wild also eat the organs of their prey, bird gizzards, their hearts, liver, etc. Though these cats may eat some bones, it's balanced out with the organs in their diet as well. When you do raw feeding, whether it's ground, frankenprey (prey model raw), or whole prey diet, folks generally follow the "80/10/5/5 rule".

If you google PMR (prey model raw), you'll find this excerpt on one website by Tracy Dion:
There are three primary methodologies for preparing a raw diet: grinding, frankenprey and whole prey. The first two are based on a general guideline that has been used by raw cat and dog feeders for decades, the 80 / 10 / 5 / 5 rule – that’s 80%-87% meat, fat, skin, sinew, connective tissue and heart, 5%-10% edible bone, 3%-5% liver, and 5% other secreting organ – while the third is as close to natural as your cat can get without catching dinner on its own. The origin of this guideline is unknown; however, rodents are roughly 5% bone and 4% liver, rabbits are slightly less than 10% bone and less than 4% liver. Birds have an even lower bone and organ content, so these numbers seem to be a rough average of the typical feline prey percentages.
Hope this clears up any confusion.
 
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