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Discussion Starter #1
This is about the cat that had a UTI a few months ago. He's not showing ANY symptoms of that anymore.

The problem is, as of a week or so ago, he's started peeing on the hallway wall. We have a new kitten in the house, and it started around that time. Could the two be related? He and the kitten get along well, the play a lot, sometimes he's too rough, but I don't think it's fighting, since there's no hissing or growling. There are plenty of liter boxes, we have two. I'd have more, but I have a small apartment. Is there some kind of behavior correction I can do for him, so he will stop this?
 

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I'd check his urine acidity again; but yes, it could definitely be related to the kitten. maybe put a cat litter box in the hallway?
I am sorry to say that some male (neutered) cats get into this mode and don't get out. I am sure more people will respond to this, but i'd get the acidity checked first. you might have to change his diet.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'd check his urine acidity again; but yes, it could definitely be related to the kitten. maybe put a cat litter box in the hallway?
I am sorry to say that some male (neutered) cats get into this mode and don't get out. I am sure more people will respond to this, but i'd get the acidity checked first. you might have to change his diet.
Yeah I was reading about that, they mentioned diet.

Here's how I feed them...

Dry Purina food in the morning, and a pack of Whiskas wet food for each (not the kitten yet) mixed with some dry at night. I feed them the same times every day.

Maybe a refill of Feliway will help...
 

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Stress of adjusting to a new kitten and what you're feeding him sounds like a recipe for (another) UTI.

Check out this website, it has some excellent information:

Feeding Your Cat: Know the Basics of Feline Nutrition :: healthy cat diet, making cat food, litter box, cat food, cat nutrition, cat urinary tract health

Once male cats get into a habit of spraying it's hard to change. You might give him more individual attention, away from the kitten. Play with him, groom him, treats, lots of loving if he enjoys that. You could try separating them, and let them have a play period once a day, supervised, for a couple of hours. The older cat may be feeling overwhelmed with a rambunctious kitten and is showing he's upset about it by peeing on the hallway wall. He's marking it as his territory. Give us an update.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Stress of adjusting to a new kitten and what you're feeding him sounds like a recipe for (another) UTI.

Check out this website, it has some excellent information:

Feeding Your Cat: Know the Basics of Feline Nutrition :: healthy cat diet, making cat food, litter box, cat food, cat nutrition, cat urinary tract health

Once male cats get into a habit of spraying it's hard to change. You might give him more individual attention, away from the kitten. Play with him, groom him, treats, lots of loving if he enjoys that. You could try separating them, and let them have a play period once a day, supervised, for a couple of hours. The older cat may be feeling overwhelmed with a rambunctious kitten and is showing he's upset about it by peeing on the hallway wall. He's marking it as his territory. Give us an update.
Thanks for the link, I'll give it a read in a bit.

Cats in general are very difficult to control if I'm correct, they're not like dogs. I guess I could be paying him more attention...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Dogs will do all sorts of things too, when you 're not watching. But I have to tell you, I lost a cat to chronic bladder issues in the 1970's using the very diet you described.
Interesting. Well, he already has his yearly checkup scheduled for the 17th, so I'll have his pH tested again.

The thing is, this vet pushes Iams like crazy, pretty sure they pay her to do that.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I think you are right about the Vet and Iams.
She has Iams stuff all over the place, and keeps saying "Get this kind of Iams" when I take them in for whatever issue.

Needless to say, I don't get Iams. :wink

So, how should I feed them to avoid UTI's?
 

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My four, well three really since Muffin won't eat it, get dry as 'cookies' only. Never enough for any meal, maybe 10-15 kibbles at once, and they have to work for each one! lol.

Muffin was never weaned onto kibbles, so he doesn't believe that it's food. It's cute actually. I give Doran one (after his high-five :)) and Muffin looks at me like "Mum! Me too!" So I give Muffin a kibble and he sniffs it, then gives me this look like "I'm not putting that in my mouth! Gross!" It's really funny. Then, of course, Doran steals Muffin's kibble. *sigh* Boys will be boys.

They do get fed a raw diet, and they love it! They get wet food as a treat once or twice a month, maybe.
 

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Kibbles as in each piece of dry food? 8 pieces isn't that much! What about wet food?
There are lots of people on the forum who only feed their cats wet food. Wet food is much healthier for them than dry is, and raw is better still.

If you feed a cat a raw diet then that means that they get all their nutrients, minerals, and energy from raw animal parts. Check out the raw subforum for more info on feeding raw. If you haven't already done it I'd highly recommend looking at the sticky for wet food at the top of the nutrition forum, here.

There are a lot of myths about dry food, and more about wet food. The best thing you can do for your pets is become educated about what they should be eating. It could very well help solve this peeing issue, and prevent many other problems too.
 
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