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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone, I need some advice.

I got a cat from my sister last night, I've been wanting one for a while now and I'm just past the two year mark since my last cat went to the Rainbow Bridge so I feel I've allowed myself enough time to mourn and respect his memory.

The problem is my new friend, Tiger looked around for a bit after I brought him out of the cat carrier and then went to hide under my bed and has been there ever since.

Now, I understand from reading up on this issue that this is normal for cats who have been thrust into a new situation, and I'm perfectly willing to let him come out when he's ready. My only concern is his well being. I've never had this issue before with a cat and I just want to make sure that eventually his survival instincts will override his shock and fear and he will come out to find food. I can't imagine he'll starve himself but I know that fear is a powerful thing.

I've put the food right by the bed in a place where I won't trip over it and it's not out in the open so he won't feel too threatened coming out.

I'm just wondering how long should I wait before I start to worry if I see he hasn't eaten?

Thanks for any help you can offer,
Murray.
 

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Oh he'll come out when he gets hungry. Just give him plenty of space and time to mellow out some. Don't worry at all, he just needs time to realize it's okay and nothings going to "get him". No cat can resist food for too long. Enjoy your new kitty!
 

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How long has he gone without eating and drinking now?

I never heard of a cat that didn't come out of hiding to eat, so I wouldn't worry in the least. I'd put the food right by his hiding place, though.

I'd also do the relaxing music, and all the things that people recommend in these forums. Those things really help accelerate the process.
 

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I had this situation times 10.

My wife and I agreed to take in spade and front claws declawed orphaned 2 yo female. Belonged to a senior who passed. What we didn't know until later, was the next elderly person had her only a month and went to hospice. From there, someone took her, had her in a dresser drawer for a couple of days, then three large men chased her around the house until they got her into a cat bag carrier and came to my house. When let out of the bag she looked in shock and hid. Didn't see her for 3 days, then she got into the spare room during one night and hid. We actually thought she got out of the house. It was almost a week before she was spotted. She got to poohing and peeing and had to get her out. 45 mins later I finally emerge from the spare room with snarling "Baby" with a belt noose and outside in the back we go. She's outside now, sneaks in the cat patio and eats and drinks. She still thinks humans want to kill and eat her. Poor thing was in shock the day she came to us, hoping to gain her trust. I talk to her through the glass doors. She will sit for that but no face to face.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
He's come out now, had a drink and used the litter. Dunno about food I didn't see him eat but he seems to be doin better now.
 

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Took my Siamese over 24 hours to eat. She did a lot of hiding at first. I wish I had pics of her little butt sticking out of the curtains when she was in an empty room. She though she was so clever.

Eventually I got what the vet told me was her favorite, rotessiere chicken, but she'd only eat when I put it where she could fell like she was hiding and aet only while I was out of the room.
 

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Besides putting her food, water and litter box handy in your bedroom, you can also just sit on the floor beside the bed and read quietly to him....I know sounds crazy, but he'll get used to your voice. You might try and engage him in some play, even if he is under the bed, with a teaser toy or fishing pole type. A catnip mouse may calm and help relax him as well. The worst thing you could do is to completely ignore him. Every time you go in the room talk to him. call him by name. You can try moving the food further away gradually. Little by little he will come around when he sees nothing bad happens, but that you're the food bringer and want to play with jim, and bring treats from time to time as well. Good luck! Don't force or rush it, it will take your cat some time to really trust you. Let us know how it goes.
 

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As I learned from a no kill rescue, cats will take roughly 48 hrs to calm down. When you first get the cat, confine them to a small room with a litter box, water, and some food. Leave them alone. They need time to calm down and take stock of the situation. The small area helps to ground and calm them.

Don't expect them to warm up to you right away. Depending on their history, it could be difficult for them to believe you aren't going to hurt them.

Just as reference, I got Captain Jack in October. I confined him for a month in a small bathroom. Every day, I would go in, clean up, sit and chat with him. I didn't stare or even look openly at him. I would talk softly about nonsense or about my day, stare at the ceiling. He was literally terrified of me and the environment. After a month, he was still wary but I was able to touch him. I took him to the vet to neuter and shots etc. Then when we came back, I confined him to a bigger room with a window for another 2 weeks. After that I let him out to the rest of the house. Now, 5.5 months after, he follows me around like a dog and is really affectionate. I touch him, call him to me, pick him up. The only thing left is to get him to let me clip his nails.

I'm sorry, got carried away. Prob more info than you need at the moment. But yah, they'll take roughly about 48 hours before calming down enough to eat. Just leave him alone. Captain Jack was terrified beyond belief and he started eating within that time period.
 

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No nail problems here

Nearly all of my 9 cats love our roof. They can climb the wooden fence to the gate arbor then a short 4 foot jump the edge of the house. I also keep a ladder up in the back for choices of egress. But, the asphalt roof takes care of the nails when they run and play and chase each other. Ha! Using their nature as climbers and explorers to unknowingly suit my needs. It's a safe zone to them, no dogs or unexpected visitors.
 

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@cushman: Mine are strictly indoor so I'll have to take care of the nails. I personally would rather do it myself anyways. I think grooming my furkids helps the bonding process. I know it certainly helps with Rocky the dog, he's especially affectionate and follows me around all day after I give him the spa treatment. LOL!
 
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