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Stanley (aka lanky teenager) Alfie (aka terror of the house) Smudge (aka first of many, RIP)
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1 year old neutered male cat who is vomiting frequently. For reference, he vomited on the 7th, the 11th and the 20th of July. The vomit is tube like, contains partially digested food and some grass. He was vomiting every few weeks before this, but I have finally started recording what we did that day, what he ate, ect.

His appetite is good, he has plenty of energy and isn't acting any different. Each time, the vomit has happened about 10 minutes after our daily walk outside. It doesn't happen every time, just on those occasions. He does ingest some grass during our walk each time, so I believe this is what is making him vomit.

I am aware that cats often eat grass when their stomach is upset. I don't want to just stop him eating the grass, I want to know why he is eating, or rather the cause of his upset stomach.

He has two meals a day, one in the morning and one at night. His food hasn't changed in any way. Its not after a meal, and the food in his vomit is partially digested already (before his evening meal). So I don't think its from eating too fast.

I am a little worried about IBD, but his stools are healthy, and he will run around and play after he vomits.

I started a thread on this before, and it was put down to hairballs, which I tried to treat for. However, there has only been a little hair in it, and since the treatment there is no hair in it at all. He doesn't shed much to begin with anyway.

I do plan to take him to the vet soon. However, I am on a budget, so I would like to at least know what to test for, or what tests to undergo, before I take him in.

TIA
 

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Unfortunately, only a vet can tell you what to test for.
It's really good that you have kept a record. Continue with that so that you can give all that info to the vet when you go in, as that will be very helpful to them in making a diagnosis and treatment plan.

But here's some advice............
My vet always starts with testing for the most likely thing(s) first. I recommend that since you are on a budget, ask your vet to do the same, rather than running a battery of tests for everything it could be. Then, if all those come back clear, and there's still a problem going ono, test for a few more things. This can save you a lot of money. some vets just want to do every test under the sun right away but that is often not necessary, and can cost a bundle.

Another thing is sometimes my vet will just say, "It's most likely this thing", and will offer treatment for that thing. If it doesn't clear up within a couple of days, then we move on to another thing. Not all vets will do this, but I appreciate this about my vet. She knows I will always do whatever is needed, no matter what, but am not made of money and she tries to accommodate that. I am lucky to have her.

Good luck with your kitty.
 

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Stanley (aka lanky teenager) Alfie (aka terror of the house) Smudge (aka first of many, RIP)
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you. My vet has a similar process, but yes, they do seem to want to run all of the tests under the sun rather than just the most likely ones to yield results 😂

I'm very much the same, if I have to pay for more tests if the first lot yield nothing, then I absolutely will, I have an emergency fund but prefer to keep it for just that.

Thanks again!
 

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The problem does seem like it's hairball related, and when cats cough them up, they often vomit when they come out. When my cats have a hack-a-thon, it looks like a slimy cigar stub in a pool of brown gunk. Gross but true. The question of why cats eat grass is the hard part. It doesn't necessarily mean that their stomach is upset. Sometimes cats eat grass because it helps them to cough up stubborn hairballs, sometimes because they're missing something in their diet, and sometimes just because it's there!

Grass acts like fiber which can help them with bowels movements. I don't know how often he poops or if he struggles when he goes, so you could track that and watch for infrequent bm's and small hard stools. It's possible he may be craving more fiber in his diet. Sometimes eating too much grass or eating it too quickly can overwhelm his digestive system and force it back up. Also, the problem with outdoor grass is, it could be treated with pesticides or contain parasites that can cause an upset stomach. Some people grow indoor cat grass. I looked into it a while ago but decided against it because I inadvertently killed an air-plant once so I didn't think it would go well.

Since he seems fine otherwise, and the one thing you're sure of is that he only vomits after eating grass, you could talk to your Vet about doing a trial run before any expensive tests are done, completely stop him from eating any grass for a couple of weeks, and see how he does.
 
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