Cat Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone. :)

My husband and I are considering going to a cats only vet clinic for our two kittens. Does anyone else have experience with these? If you do, do you like them better than a regular vet? They appeal to me because they specialize in just cats, and there is one very close to us.

The last time we took them into a vet, about 15 patients came in while we were there, and they were ALL dogs. It's not that I don't like dogs, it just felt really weird, like our poor little cats were second class citizens or something. (Maybe I'm weird, haha!) Our kittens were in a foster home with dogs, so I doubt the dogs being there added to their anxiety...though maybe it did.

Anyway, I'm just wondering what some of your opinions are. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,308 Posts
I also would like to go to a cat-only vet. There's ONE in my state, and it's "only" a 40 minute drive. But my cats get so stressed out with a 14 minute drive, that I'm not sure I want to put them through that.
Plus, the vet is rather expensive ...which I can understand, as it's a specialized clinic. But I'm barely able to afford a regular vet as it is (borrowed money for my last visit).

I'm not much of a dog person. I guess I don't mind just being around them, but some owners think that their "baby" can do no wrong. Some guy had a Great Dane in the office the other day, and was letting it jump up on people! Despite being a "puppy" (at 1.5 yrs old) this dog just got weighed at 165 lbs! I only weigh 80, and if I had been jumped on, I would'a fallen flat on my a$$! He thought it was funny and cute, and when he noticed I kept my distance, tried to do the ol'e "Oh, he won't hurt you, he's just playing" thing. Oiy!

I once took my feral kitten in to the vet, and had him in my lap because he was freaking out about the carrier. Once in my lap he was calm and fine... a full-grown Dalmation walked right past, and the kitten - who had been completely feral just 2 weeks before - didn't even fluff up his hackles!
I guess it just depends on the personality of the cat if they're okay with other animals being in the area. Paizly doesn't do well even with Nebbie trying to play with her sometimes, and they've been together almost 3 years now. (But then, Paizly is afraid of her own shadow!)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
26,493 Posts
I love my vets, but if I can, I try to schedule my cats to be seen by their cat specialist, who only works one day a week there. But I trust all of them.

Most often, there are mostly dogs there, which I love because it helps calm my puppy fever. :grin:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,451 Posts
I haven't used a cat-only vet, since the only one in the vicinity is a half-hour plus drive away and I'm quite happy with the girls' current vet. In addition, my girls are quite young and (touch wood) don't have any health issues. So, they only need a vet for wellness check-ups, rabies boosters and the like. Still, I think I will consider trying the cat-only vet once the girls are a little older. I figure a vet who deals solely with cats ought to be more familiar with all of the nuances associated cats than is a vet who sees numerous animals. Of course, just as with doctors and dentists, there are bound to be good ones and bad ones...and I'd rather have a good "all-animal" vet than a bad cat only vet. In your position, I'd certainly give the cat-only vet a try. If you aren't happy, you can always look elsewhere or return to your current vet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,244 Posts
My kitties' current vet is a "cat only" vet, and I have been very impressed by her practice so far. I've only been there 3 times, with a cat twice, but I already have respect for the practice. Each time I've had to go over there, I simply called first and they did what they could to fit me in before closing time. The went the first time because Pumpkin had thrown up a few times with diarrhea. The vet was a little intimidating at first because she isn't a touchy/feely person, but she was very methodical and logical in her approach to diagnosing Pumpkin. Even though she thought I was overreacting (Pumpkin was acting normal besides the symptoms), she kept her overnight for observation and possible testing. The second time was because Simone starting losing clumps of fur after I adopted him; she showed me that it was only ringworm and how to do the black-light test. The third time I had to go because Pumpkin caught the ringworm, and the practice was nice enough to allow me to purchase the medicine without getting her examined. To sum it up, I feel that my vet is more knowledgeable of cats and probably more flexible with people because she only works with cats (aka she can trust you to do minor diagnosis's because she had the time to teach you herself). The other perks to my particular practice is that I don't have to worry about dogs scaring my cats, healthy cats are allowed to play on the many cat trees they have out in the waiting room, their boarding areas are made specifically for cats (Each cat has two "rooms" overlooking several outside bird feeders, and the rooms are single row so the cats aren't death-glaring at each other) and the staff all like cats. They even offer heated rooms for geriatric cats.

Basically, I don't know how similar your cat practice will be to mine, but I think you should definitely give it a try! :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
782 Posts
we use a cats only vet, she(the vet) only does cats and is exceptional in both knowledge and handling. having no barking dogs about helps in the stress issues, her prices are much better than some of the other larger multi animal offices in the area.. (less overhead? you can house many cats in the space that would only fit a couple of dogs) better personal service(she knows all our cats by name and health issues) no vet techs in training doing proceedures.. best bet for a vet, cat only. next choice small practice( large waiting rooms and free coffee does nothing for your cat..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
723 Posts
I use a cats only vet. I'm lucky. In NYC it's just as easy to find a cats only practice. I'm actually on my second one :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,681 Posts
Sorry I'm late to this -- getting over the flu :(.

We take Gracie to a cat only clinic, or actually, a cat and bird clinic, which is an odd combo. I really like how attentive and tuned in everyone is there to all things cat :), it's very nice. By contrast, the times we've had to take Gracie in for an emergency visit to the general animal clinic (toys swallowed in the middle of the night) there have been some very noisy suffering dogs, and I think the added noise did add stress to our situation...

The bird aspect of the cat clinic is funny! The first time we went the two resident chickens were out and about, and Gracie was really intimidated! She was just a kitten. There also was a duck walking around (belonging to one of the receptionists), who created a minor scene when it made a big messy poop in hall. Yuck!

:) Fran
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,855 Posts
The vet we take out pets to is a whole 1 minute walk away, and the cat clinic is a whole 2 minute walk away... why on earth have I never thought of going there before?! I guess it's partly because my cat seems very happy at the regular vets - seriously, she walks around there like it's her home and is really friendly to the vet... it's really weird, since she avoids strangers in every other instance and is normally more cautious in a new enviorment.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,136 Posts
Its been our experience with working with ferals and sick abandoned companion cats that weve taken to all the vets in our area. Dog/cat vet. The vets really know dogs but not really knowledgable with cats esp ones from off the street. Its a gleaning process. Weve now found 2 vets which really know their stuff. Theyve helped us figure out really crazy condition which werent common. I would think a cats only vet would be a possitive. Just so they are the younger educated vets. Had bad bad experiences with old timer vets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,168 Posts
I love the idea of species-specific clinics, or at least clinics with specialists for each species.

I don't know if there are any of that sort near me. Thankfully my regular vet, while not a cat-specific vet, seems very knowledgeable about cats. When we were trying to solve Athena's health issues she even suggested we look into a genetic disease sometimes found in siamese cats (and siamese mixes) that I had never heard of (I forget the name of it now, unfortunately). While thankfully that was not what Athena had, I am glad to know that my vet is familiar enough with cats that she was able to bring up a rare breed-specific illness off the top of her head. And that she knew enough to agree a grain-free diet was a good choice for Athena as opposed to pushing any pricey prescription diets sold in the office on me. I feel like I'm in good hands with her!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,720 Posts
Our vet practice is not species specific, and for the most part, it seems they see a lot of dogs. In the waiting room sometimes it's a little weird. Most dogs are badly trained and they want to jump all over people, sniff at the carrier, etc., but I always make an appt. first so I never wait for more than 10 minutes, if that. They have certain doctors, who mostly deal with cats so the wait is never as long as for the doctors who mostly deal with dogs ;)

The practice is pro raw. I am able to discuss my cats' diet openly and it's great, particularly when one of my cats had an issue with her diet. However, I do get the feeling that most of their clients feed all commercial foods. When I have had conversations with them about raw feeding, they have always been very supportive once they realized I had done my research and wasn't just giving them hot dogs and sausages.

I have a vet clinic, which is much closer to my home, but I was in there once because I was pondering boarding my cat there last year, and what I saw scared me so bad. I would not trust them with any animal. It's really sad some people don't ask to look at what is going on behind the scenes or what their philosophy is, etc.

We also went a couple of times to the ASPCA and although the care was good, their prices were higher than my current vet, they had a really long wait ALWAYS, are really far from my home, and the vet's are not really on-board with the whole raw thing. I felt as if they are pressured to promote certain foods since they get major donations from cat food companies. The clinic is also very large and it doesn't get the attention as far as cleanliness it needs when another patient comes in. I always felt like my cats were gonna catch something from one of the tables.

We also tried the Humane Society. The services and prices are good, but the cleanliness leaves a lot to be desired, geographically it's really out of the way for me, and the wait is ridiculous! So, my current vet practice wins, hands down :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Sorry I didn't respond -busy weekend...

Thanks for the replies, everyone! :) My husband took our kittens to the cats only vet on Saturday (I was unable to go) and he LOVED it. They are pricier than the regular vets in our area, but we both feel it's worth it. He said everyone working there was extremely nice and the kittens seemed much more relaxed without all the dogs everywhere. He also said the vet and the techs were super gentle with Lily, our skittish girl, constantly praising her and helping her feel safe.

He also loved all the cat pictures everywhere, the video of kittens playing in the waiting room (haha), and all the cat items for sale. So, we're sold on this vet!

And Fran - a cat and bird clinic - that made me laugh out loud! haha! What a strange and potentially fascinating idea...:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
I have two cat vets, one dog vet, a horse/goat vet and a rabbit vet. One cat vet does only cats and is about 25 minutes away, I had them first so the cats that started there, stay there. The other cat vet does cats, SMALL dogs and exotics, she is about 10 minutes away. The horse/goat vet does only livestock, with an emphasis on horses. The rabbit guy works in a general practice but he's the only one they schedule the rabbit/rodents with.

While I love the cat only vet they are much more expensive ($150 for routine vaccs and annual check) and farther away (longer crate time/stress) and are out of my 'normal' areas of town. The new cat vet is between my house and the freeway into town and while she's not 'exclusive' most of her practice is cats and it's $50-60 for vaccs and annual checkup.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top