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Hi,

My cats eyes are tearing, at first I thought this was because I changed the food type (Changed to grain free formula), but after a second thought could this be because of teeth problems ??
my did have multiple extractions about a year ago, I got her a tooth paste and a tooth brush so the problem wouldn't happen again...
it seems the problem is back, but I just had to make sure before making any wrong decisions (Since I really felt like the vet wanted milk me for money and didn't really much care for the cats health).
I took a photo of the tooth and it seems like there is an infection, and I suppose the vet wouldn't recommend plaque and tartar cleaning (since he only recommended extraction in the past, even wanted to extract all cats teeth...)
just to make sure, do you think this could be solved any other way than extractions ?

What do you think I should do ? I really want the best for the cat.
 

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There's a lot of tartar and plaque buildup on the tooth on the left hand side of the photo, which probably indicates there is a lot on the other interior teeth as well. And the bubble form on the lower gum looks like some kind of growth. You don't know what kind it is...could be many different things. But only a vet can tell you what it is.

Is there by any chance a different vet you can go to if you were not happy with the last one?

I personally think extracting all of a cat's teeth should be avoided unless it is absolutely necessary, and most often it is not.

Here. we have dental veterinarians but I don't know if you have any where you live. There is no reason to extract a tooth just because it needs a thorough cleaning.
 

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PS.......assuming that the growth on the gum is taken care of, I do have a recommendation for you. I don't know how easy it would be for you to get this where you are or what it would cost to ship it to you, but there's a wonderful product called Oratene. It is a gel that comes in a tube like toothpaste, and you can simply rub it onto the cat or dog's teeth every day. After a couple of weeks of doing this every day, you can actually just chip that plaque off with your fingernail easily. the Oratene Gel doesn't have any strong flavor and I have never had a cat or dog object to it.

If there's a bad build up, brushing the teeth won't help. but after you get that build up off, you can keep them good by just using the gel, either with your finger or a toothbrush.

(psst....I actually use this gel myself instead of toothpaste and I hardly ever go to a dentist. When I do go and tell them how long it has been they are always surprised that my teeth look so good)

Now, the tearing eyes...........that may be connected or may not. But is likely to be caused by something other than the teeth, it seems to me.
 

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Hi g. I'm so sorry about your cats teeth. My Katie recently went through several tooth extractions due to periodontal disease. Her regular Vet completely missed it for years, and by sheer luck, we had an appnt with his partner who identified the problem and said she needed a thorough dental exam. He didn't do dental work so I found another Vet who was certified in animal dentistry, but it wasn't easy because there weren't many in my area and the few who were were booked for months. I firmly believe that if she was diagnosed and treated much sooner than she was, Kate wouldn't have had to go through what she did. And by that point, the expense was eye-popping! So I strongly recommend you get this addressed asap by a professional. If you don't trust your Vet and can't find one that's a certified dentist, then find another Vet or Animal Hospital that can do a proper exam and is skilled in extensive dental work.
 

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Andy and Bugsy, best buds!
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Yes, we had our cat Milo's teeth cleaned and extracted due to gum disease. Gum disease can quickly lead to renal failure. The cleaning/extraction process requires the cat undergoing anesthesia so at some point he/she becomes too old and it is too risky. Sounds like you've done everything right. I wish you all the best.
 
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