Cat Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi. As my Susan is now on a renal diet she has diarrhoea since Saturday. The vet said as I had changed from her previous food to renal the sudden change is probably the cause. I am giving her a probìotic which she likes and her behaviour and demeanour is fine. The vet has now changed her thyroid meds to pills and we began this evening so fingers crossed for this. Any suggestions re food? I was going to mix some of her previous food with the new and also give her cooked chicken:unsure:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Hi!

Yes, cats can get stomach issues if you change their diet too quickly. Most cats should be able to switch completely to a new food in a few weeks. And yes, giving her probiotics (made for cats), cooked chicken or fish in small portions throughout the day and mixing the old food with the new food could work out very well!

When cats have diarrhoea they become dehydrated very easily and this could be dangerous if it goes on for too long, so if she’s still experiencing diarrhoea after a day of giving her cooked chicken or fish and also mixing the old food with the new food, I highly recommend going back to the old food completely.

If you go back to the old food completely and she’s still not improving after a day, you could give her specific medications for cats with diarrhoea.

Make sure she stays hydrated and keeps eating. If these tips are not working or if she’s becoming lethargic it could be best to go to a veterinarian. It’s important that the diarrhoea stops as quickly as possible, especially since she’s had it for multiple days now.

When her stomach is working as usual again, you could add more of the new food and less of the old everyday until she only gets the new food (this could go on for a few weeks). If she has a relapse, give her more of the old food and less of the new food and then go even slower while switching to the new food. If the new food doesn't seem like it's working at all, consider switching to another brand.

I hope she'll get better soon! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
669 Posts
My experience is that the veterinary prescription foods are crappy foods with terrible ingredients. I would not give that to my animals.

If the new food doesn't suit her, go back to what does and don't mess around with it. The most important thing is hydration, so if possible don't give her any dry food, only wet, and mix in water. The important thing about a renal diet is lean protein and low phosphorus in the foods. If you read ingredients labels you can see which foods have less phosphorus in them. But the bottom line is what will the cat eat, and what can the cat eat and be healthy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hello again. Susan is taking her hyperthyroid tablets no problem. I have been mixing old and new food but without much success and she has barely eaten at all today. Last night she was a little sick, (white foam), and I haveJust cooked her a bit of salmon and she turned her nose up at this! She isn't lethargic and keeps hassling for attention which I'm sure is food related. Her poo is still a bit runny. I want to avoid going to the vets again. I seem to be there so many times, but If I have to I will. Are these symptoms common? Maybe she will be better tomorrow :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
669 Posts
Yes, those symptoms are common, which doesn't mean they are not bad.
It is very important that she eats. Try Fancy Feast.
The thing is renal failure affects appetite so you have to try to find something that is so enticing she will eat it anyway. Fancy Feast, while not a good cat food, is made to appeal strongly to cats and most will be interested even when ill. If that doesn't work, keep trying. I bought about 20 cans, all different foods, when my cat had renal failure, in order to find out what he would eat. You can return any that you don't open.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks again Mosi. She has had some Sheba this morning. I have ordered some other renal food. I think the prescription food I was told to get will be given away! I will try Fancy Feast. As you say I think I will just keep trying different ones. I also saw the list of foods on Tanyas site and will get some of those with the lower phosphorus levels. I am so glad I found this forum. It makes me feel more reassured!! :) :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
669 Posts
Good to hear. You can do this. I didn't know one thing about renal failure when my cat was diagnosed. I cried about it for three says and then got serious and started doing research. I learned so much about how to keep a renal failure cat healthy that I could have just about written a book about it! It takes dedication, but it can be done and from the sounds of it, you got this. :)
Any support I can offer, just ask.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
669 Posts
How did you treat your cat with renal failure? What worked for your cat? Would be very interesting to hear someone's experience :)
Well, the most important thing I did was to join an online group of people with cats who had CRF. They helped me as much or more than all the vets I went to, and saved his life more than once.

I took him in to have a CBC once a month. According to the results, I would tweak his food this way or that. the folks in the support group helped me learn how to interpret the blood results and taught me what to do.

I gave him sub-Q fluids daily, and watched his diet and water intake and what he left in the catbox closely and adjusted accordingly. I called around every single place in town until I found two different places where, with a scrip from my vet, I could get the lines and needles and the bags of lactated ringers at the lowest price, and they were very affordable that way. I was lucky that my cat was The King Of Mellow and he and I were soulmates, so he trusted me completely and let me do the sub-Q daily without any problem. Other cats need to be coaxed and taught how to take it but most can be taught.

I researched endlessly and found the cat foods with the lowest possible phosphorus and gave that to him rather than the prescription foods that have what I consider to be terrible ingredients and insufficient nutrient value. sometimes this meant actually calling the cat food company until I got someone on the line who actually knew the answers to my questions.

You can also give phosphorus binders to your cat to help with the phosphorus issues if your cat won't eat the low-phosphorus cat foods. You will know when this is needed by knowing the phos. levels in your cat's blood. When I had a CBC done I always got the results printed out. You need also to know what the normal range for those levels is so that you know what those numbers mean.

I dedicated my life to taking care of my cat. He meant everything to me. My world and each day revolved around making sure he had everything I could provide to keep him healthy and happy. The fact that we has such a close relationship helped a lot as well.

It cost me a lot of money. I didn't care. I was not a person with a lot of money but i did without a lot of other things to provide for him, and really the only expensive thing was the monthly CBC which was about $100, and the occasional emergency visit when he started to crash.

You can take good care of a cat with CRF if you do your research and dedicate yourself to it. You don't have to do everything I did, but you will have to do some of it or your cat just won't live as long. I wish you the best of luck, and if you have more questions just ask.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top