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Hi! :)
Two of my three cats are microchipped. What would be the best way to change the information on it? We got them from my aunts friend who was going through a divorce and couldn't keep them. We're finally getting around to changing their information. I looked online and didn't find all that much. One has an AVID chip and I have no idea what the other is. The vet printed up a paper with his chip number and said to go to found.org. Would it be best to call both AVID and found.org to change it? Will there be a fee to change the information from the previous owners to ours?


Also, do you recommend collars for cats? Our previous vet didn't recommend them because even some of the break away ones don't break away all that easy.

Thank you!!
 

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All of mine had been micro-chipped in the rescue before we took them home. Our vet scanned the details into their computer and we just had to contact the company to let them know change of address (and cats' names if I remember rightly). they didn't charge us for changing details but I don't know what's normal.
 

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In my experience with chips it should either allow you to do it online or by phone.

As for collars I personally have always used them. When I got Tsuki/Sera at five months within a few days they were collared with tags and Vincent was collared within a few days as well at 11 weeks (wanted to give him time to settle in and since I wasn't traveling with him it wasn't as high a priority).
 

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I personally don't use collars (even break-away) because a family friend's cat hung herself years ago on a TV stand doorknob with a break-away collar when she was rubbing against the stand which was obviously horribly traumatic for them to come home to. Your vet is definitely correct that break-away collars don't always break-away. My cats are strictly indoor only so I don't see the benefit - they're notorious for getting into things so I just don't want to risk it.
 

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My outdoor cat has worn a break-away collar for 17 years with no incidents or issues (obviously, not the same collar for 17 years!) You need to test the collar yourself by hand and when it's on the cat's neck to assure yourself it will break off. My favorite brand, both for ease of break-away and effectiveness, is Rogz.

I have a friend in Arizona who has two cats. She never got them collars/tags because they are "strictly indoors" and will "never get out". She was positive they would never, ever get out. Then, one day, her brother opened a window, and the male cat tore the screen out and both cats got out. The younger female was not vaccinated. Luckily my friend found them both quickly, but she could have lost both, or had a VERY sick kitty if the female had gotten exposed while outdoors.

Another friend also had a "strictly indoors" cat who would "never get out". My friend never put a collar on her, nor did she have this cat spayed because she was so convinced her cat would never get out of the house. Of course, the cat got out, and was gone for two weeks. Luckily a neighbor ended up finding her and returned her, but by then the cat was pregnant. She had tons of complications to the pregnancy, including needing a C-section and infection, and one of the kittens died.

Both of my friends were very lucky that they got their cats back quickly after they escaped, but it's not the typical experience, unfortunately.

So, in my experience, "Oh they'll never get out" is not an excuse to collar and tag your cat. You might be the most careful person in the world, but if you have other people EVER coming into your house, that's a risk. Plus cats are lightning-fast when a door or window is open, and will literally teleport outside before you can get it closed.

The collar CAN be a scary thing, but honestly, I think the risk of a GOOD, high-quality breakaway collar NOT breaking-away is very small. If a cat is able to strangle itself on its collar before the collar breaks, I feel like there was probably some defect or too-tightness that could have been detected if the collar was extensively tested before placing it on the cat.

Like I said, my cat has worn breakaway collars her entire life, and she is an outdoors cat. She has lost a few - maybe 3 - over the course of her life. Right now I prefer this brand:

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/Rogz-8-Inch-Safeloc-Breakaway-Adjustable/dp/B003V4ARVE/ref=sr_1_14?s=pet-supplies&ie=UTF8&qid=1451805471&sr=1-14&keywords=rogz+cat+collar[/ame]

That's not the exact one I have, but you can see that it has an ADJUSTABLE breakaway strength. I use the "lightest"/least strength setting.

I also have two different tags on the collar, but that's because she's outdoors and I'm paranoid :}
 

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You need to test the collar yourself by hand and when it's on the cat's neck to assure yourself it will break off.
While this is good advice, people need to realize that our hand strength is much more powerful than the weight of a light cat so that's not always the best way to test them. My cats are only 7 pounds, so unless their weight came crashing down to break the collar it wouldn't break easily, if at all.

Obviously, I wasn't recommending not spaying/neutering your pet because they'll "never get out". I recommend all precautions are taken, I am just personally not a fan of break-away collars since I know personally of one death and other cats being stuck for hours. I feel like the breakaways I've come into contact are one extreme or the other - they either don't break off easily enough (especially for lightweight cats), or they break off too easy and break off the second a twig scrapes it :lol:. This was the problem with my childhood indoor/outdoor cat - we tried breakaway collars for years. She would either get stuck to branches, or would home collarless. We just got her microchipped and stopped collaring her since we had so many issues.

It's definitely up to someone's personal opinion. I think it also heavily depends on your living situation and how likely it is that someone else in the home would accidentally let the cat out, leave a window open, etc, especially in homes with multiple family members.
 

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My girls are microchipped, they've never worn collars and never will.
 

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All my boys are microchipped. They also HAVE collars ad tags but rarely wear them. If I have company staying at the house then I collar them. I don't trust others to be as careful and wary of them near the door.

It also helps people to tell Neelix and Book apart, which I don't get because other than both being black they look nothing alike.
 

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My tame cats have always been collared. I did have one who strangled himself. It was horrible to find and I still feel responsible for that - should have seen that danger and all. My feral is not collared and I like my hands and arms too much to even try. ;) Maybe some day? My son has cats that are "always indoors" but each one has managed in some way to get out. Not often, but once is enough.
 

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The chip companies will let you update your information online or by phone. But you are changing owners and that s a little bit more tricky. They are going to require proof of ownership change. Contact the company for exactly what you need to do.
 

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Get your vet to do a microchip scan or go to a shelter that will do them and they can look up what company it is from. Go on the company's website or call to find out how to re-register the chip to your name. My granddaughter found a cat and the company was reluctant to change the info until they got ahold of the original registered owner. They were not able to so after 30 days, my son was able to get the chip into their names.
 
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