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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So this cat, orange tom cat, has been hanging around outside our apartment for about six months. When he first came to visit his tail was freshly cut off. (don't know how) We tried taking him to the vet a few times but he would never let us get a hold of him. (Although he is very friendly, he doesn't want to be picked up and when he sees you are trying, he runs) The tail has, however, never really healed. It's always bleeding and pussing. VERY nasty to look at. I finally caught him today and took him in, where they gave him an antibiotic shot, I gave him some advantage (for the HORRIBLE fleas) and I released him again. They recommended that in two weeks I bring him back in for "cosmetic surgery" where they would take off another segment and fold the skin over so the fur would cover the nub and it wouldn't get scraped up anymore. It would only cost $65 dollars, so I can afford it. Now if the antibiotic does work and in two weeks he has healed properly, this surgery would be purely cosmetic. It would make him more appealing for anyone wanting to adopt him, but as far as a stray goes, cosmetics are not really necessary and I know it would be painful and uncomfortable for him. What should I do?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
another question: do cats care about their appearance? Like is he going to have a complex because of his nub? My house cats seem to be very vain... :)
 

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I agree with Kristen...it can't be good for him if his tail is continually infected and bleeding, so I would say it's more than just cosmetic.
 

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No...cats don't care about their appearance, they have no clue what that's about. Cats care about pain and about function. If the surgery is to help keep the tail healed, then it's not purely cosmetic. It's to keep him pain free with a functioning tail. And cats definitely need their tail...it helps with balance, communication and hunting. Given the price of the surgery, I would definitely recommend going ahead with it, even though it's not your cat.
 

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One of my Devons had a birth accident with his tail. Momcat chewed half of it off; I guess she thought it was an umbilical cord. She was an experienced queen and had never done anything like that before. The breeder heard the kitten screaming and actually had to finish off the job, as it was dangling. So Zuba has a long stump, but it never seems to bother him, doesn't mind it being touched, nor does he seem embarrassed about it. He prances around and sticks it straight up as a normal cat would, and wags it furiously when he's watching birds or squirrels, and thumps it against his cat tree.
 

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I'd say get it done.Also I do think they care about appearance sometimes because Boo* does seem to notice other cats have tail or the dog has a tail and it has became a running gag in my family that he has "small tail issues" that cause him to attack other animals tails.But please get the surgery done for him.

*Boo is a Manx mix cat.
 

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If his tail is going to be all hairless and weird at the end, he will be more susceptible to fleas and mosquitoes, so I would get it done for that reason.
 

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Well, mosquitoes I can maybe see but I don't see how it would make him more susceptible to fleas. I thought fleas LIKED hiding in fur.....
 

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I didn't say the cat wouldn't get fleas, just wondered what you meant when you said it would make the naked part of the tail MORE susceptible to fleas.
 

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Hot skin exposed to the air would be like a red flag I would presume.
 
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