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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone with experience? It's on her rear right thigh. Just noticed it today so I don't have any history to talk about. She's indoor/outdoor and licked away enough fur for me to notice. Thought she might have been in a fight but after cutting away some fur I instantly thought cancer. She's not showing any other symptoms like appetite problems or lethargy at this time.

It's slightly browner than in the pic. The flash brings out the red alot. Jagged edges. Asymmetrical. I understand that you guys can't provide professional advice but thought I'd ask.
Thank you.

Cat Felidae Small to medium-sized cats Snout Whiskers
 

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Stanley (aka lanky teenager) Alfie (aka terror of the house) Smudge (aka first of many, RIP)
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Hard to say. It could just be an overgrooming sore, or melanoma, as you suggested. It could also be a range if other things. I think the only definitive answer you will get is from a vet.

Unfortunately all we can offer are guesses.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your reply. The wound is healing nicely. Probably an insect bite - spider maybe? I kept track of the healing with pics so here's the progression. Maybe it will help someone else diagnose a similar wound. My cat did lick at the spot and she would lick off the pus(?) filled sacks that kept trying to form. Don't know if that's good or bad.

Skin Eye Iris Nerve Service
 

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Please do not ask for medical advice on the internet. Your cat needs more from you that the guesses of strangers who are not there.
Take your cat to the vet!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Please do not ask for medical advice on the internet. Your cat needs more from you that the guesses of strangers who are not there.
Take your cat to the vet!
The whole "do not ask for medical advice on the internet and just your animal to the vet" refrain to people asking for medical advice on the internet is irresponsible. What's the point of any medical advice on the internet at all then?

From my opening post it is clear I am not looking for be-all-end-all medical advice that would throw the responsibility of caring for my pet onto strangers:
mrwhiskers said:
I understand that you guys can't provide professional advice but thought I'd ask.
It is clear that the intention for my second post is to provide good data (close up pictures of the progression of a wound) and not seeking more "stranger medical advice". This can help other people judge the severity of any wounds on their animals instead of being completely in the dark. How many people need advice at night or on weekends? How many people out there take care of not just one cat? Two? Three? Ten? Strays? The misguided refrain assumes I am (and everyone is) prepared or has the means to spend hundreds or thousands of dollars at every sign of a lesion/wound or problem.

Also, the refrain implies medical personnel (in this case vets) are some all powerful and knowledgeable entity without the flaws that come with human beings - presumably educated or not. If medical malpractice occurs in people medical care, it most certainly occurs in animal care.

The better advice for anyone seeking medical advice on the internet about their cats or pets should be:

1. Data is king. Provide as much detailed info as possible with as much clear close up pictures as possible. Too far away or unclear pics are useless. If your cat has a wound, the area around the wound needs to be clear too. If the wound is hidden by hair, that decreases the chance of strangers helping with advice. I think even the close up pics I provided aren't all that great. I am already thinking about a better camera that will focus quickly - animals can be very squirrelly when you try to take pictures of their bodies.
2. Monitor the problem closely, keeping a diary possibly, daily pictures, etc. You need DATA.
3. You are essentially your cat's first vet and that means you need to start thinking like a medical professional. That means data, details, and diagnosis skills. Many problems (you wait too long) get worst. That's the fear/concern. If I wait will it get worst? Will it get better?
4. If you do the above you need to determine fairly quickly the status of the problem:
a. minor
b. moderate
c. serious
e. critical
f. fatal

Helping people understand that a non-professional diagnosis still requires behavior/thinking like a professional is what is needed so they can determine if that is right for them. Some don't have the skills, the intelligence, or the motivation. It can make the decision to spend the money on a vet that much easier. A blanket statement of "do not ask for medical advice on the internet and just your animal to the vet" is not good enough.
 

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Disclaimer posted on Health and Nutrition:

"Please contact a vet!

Those are the words we're most likely to offer in any emergency health situation. By the time a health question or problem is considered an emergency, time is usually of vital importance. Please rely on your vet first.

We are not qualified to offer alternatives to the expertise or actions of a trained veterinarian. Time spent awaiting a reply could be at the expense of crucial time getting emergency services."


I don't understand why another member also said, rightly so, to take your cat to the vet - advice which you thanked them for - yet you went after Mosi for the same advice.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Disclaimer posted on Health and Nutrition:

"Please contact a vet!

Those are the words we're most likely to offer in any emergency health situation. By the time a health question or problem is considered an emergency, time is usually of vital importance. Please rely on your vet first.

We are not qualified to offer alternatives to the expertise or actions of a trained veterinarian. Time spent awaiting a reply could be at the expense of crucial time getting emergency services."


I don't understand why another member also said, rightly so, to take your cat to the vet - advice which you thanked them for - yet you went after Mosi for the same advice.
I think StanAndAlf actually read the part where I said I understand professional advice can't be provided. The response did try to at least give some advice aside from just "take it to the vet". What upset me is the "Please do not ask for medical advice on the internet." from the second poster. That's just blanket statement that dis-empowers people. Not just pet owners, but your own care. Now, it is true that there is a certain level of intelligence required for diagnoses using pure data off the internet - it's not for everyone. It also requries time. Probably most do need to be pressured (maybe motivated) into taking their pet to a vet.

If the Health and Nutrition disclaimer is parsed the first sentence clearly refers to any "emergency health situation". But what if it isn't an emergency? And how do you know if it is or isn't emergency? I think the majority of questions looking for advice is to determine exactly that - if it is emergency or not. We could boil down questions (even my OP) to "will my pet eventually die from this if I don't take it to the vet"? People who have the means to go to the vet at any problem don't usually ask for advice on a forum. The disclaimer and the immediate responses of just "take it to the vet" tries to limit liability (whether legal or just moral) if a pet does die or serious problems arise due to any advice provided. Not saying there is anything wrong with a disclaimer - people do need to be made aware clearly that any advice provided is not a substitute for professional care.... but good advice can actually help and even motivate a vet visit (give the poster more assurance that an issue does need to be addressed by a vet).

Given human nature as it is - many people will just rely on hope when little to no information is provided. That means not only will the poster not use their own intelligence to help care for their pet but there won't be a vet visit either.
 

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but good advice can actually help and even motivate a vet visit (give the poster more assurance that an issue does need to be addressed by a vet).

Given human nature as it is - many people will just rely on hope when little to no information is provided. That means not only will the poster not use their own intelligence to help care for their pet but there won't be a vet visit either.
Good advice is most often "Take your animal to the vet" because from photos people usually cannot tell whether or not something needs medical care. And it is irresponsible for anyone to give medical advice without training, and without seeing the animal.

To say that the poster won't use their own intelligence and won't take the animal to a vet is such a broad sweeping statement that it really has no validity.

People who have the means to go to the vet at any problem don't usually ask for advice on a forum.
In my experience of years spent on many animal forums this is not true; most people who ask for advice on a forum for animals and are told it would be best to consult a vet will do so. Occasionally, but not often, a person will say they don't have the means and then forum members will brainstorm with the person on how to get the funds needed to visit a vet.
 
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