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Hi, I am new to this forum, but hope you can help. I have 3 cats. Two siamese, Hartley and Scampie and a moggy, Lilly. They are all rescue cats. Hartley and scampie came to me when they were five and I do not have a medical history. My problem is Hartley, who is a Apricot Point. Hee has had lots of trouble with his teeth, and now only has his front ones (all others extracted by vet) They tell me he had resorbative lesions and have advised me to stop feeding with tined food and to only feed dry,special dental cat food. Also to start using an enzymatic tooth treatment. As I am sure you all know, if I am going to feed one cat something, I am going to have to feed them all it.

My question is, does anyone have experience of this type of dental disease? What food to purchase and is the tooth treatment necessary?

All advice will be greatfully recieved.....thank you.
 

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I have had the same trouble with two of my three cats, however, not so many teeth needed to be removed. I do not know how the dental diet will help, as I am under the impression that it is only successful at cleaning the teeth used in chewing (ie: the back, carnassials that your kitty doesn't have). The advice to keep them off tinned food is probably a good idea, though.
For my cats, I have decided to forego the dental food as they are all obese and have to be put on a special weight-loss program. Instead, I brush their teeth everyday, and apply a protective wax to their teeth once a week (ProV-seal). I feel that this treatment is necessary to prevent further pain on your pet's part and strain on your wallet. Brushing actually takes very little time at all! :p
Lots of luck,
Leah
 

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Julie: Yes there are other things you can do.
I also do not feel a dental diet is necissary, and lord help you if your vet tells you to get Science Diet dental!

There are some people who believe that a mostly or all dry food diet is better for the cats teeth and gums.
Then again there is other people who believe wet food is better for that same reason.

I however, believe they both have their benifits, but that the dry food would be best for dental under most circumstances.

See what products your vet has, or you can check up some reviews on products sold online or at petsmart, when it comes to dental care.
There are kits you can buy that don't cost much, and they come with a small brush and a finger brush and flavored toothpaste. You can try this and hopefully your cats will go along because they like the taste of it. ;)
 
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