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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know my boy Jessie had some dental issues a while back. When he came to us his teeth looked pretty bad, but we couldn't afford to work on them. They look good these days, I think since he's well cared for now (foodwise & living conditions), and I see no signs of an ulcer on his gums that was there one year ago. I don't think his antibiotics cured it--my poor boy showed extreme pain when the medication contacted his gums and fought so hard it would have taken raptor gloves to ever medicate him orally again. That VERY unlike Jess. Over the course of the year, then, his teeth have whitened considerably and I think his ulcer's completely gone. There was a tooth that had issues...and that's where my extreme reservations come in. I've never had dental work that didn't result in intense pain on my part for several years afterward. If dentists can't do a good job on my teeth, how can I trust a vet to touch my cat's teeth without leaving him in pain? If a tooth needs pulled, how do I know it won't get filled with junk & cause major issues? It was a back tooth. Jessie's a fragile guy, the trust and bond with him is unique and deep and he's been so badly hurt by people. How can I do that to him when I can't picture it ending well? I would ask a vet, but I've only been to one here and didn't like her. So...what do you guys do about dental issues, how do you feel about them?

I know this is silly (they're vets, they can see it as well as I) but Jessie also has some structural damage to his jaw and skull. His mouth doesn't always close right, I hear his teeth grinding on the side where the tooth is fouled if he bites wrong when eating or playing. He exhibits minor discomfort and annoyance, but not outright pain, then goes back to playing when things line up right again. I fear the vets not taking his specialness into account. He's got so many physical issues...balance, skull damage, a little mental slowness...god, the scars on his leg and some pads!...it's so hard to trust a vet. They see cats every day, and everyone thinks their cat is special, and so few really are to a vet's outlook, I'm sure.

Does anyone have recommendations for getting over reservations when you're massively overprotective of a broken cat?
 

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It will be worse if Jessie is in pain because of a bad tooth, that may be badly infected if not already. It's possible he may need to have it extracted. For most dental work, even cleaning, antibiotics are administered and a blood work done to ensure a safe surgery several days prior to surgery and post-surgery. This should prevent any infection. You can ask your vet to give pain relief post surgery. Pain relief may be given at the end of the surgey, and a pain patch put on to given continued relief of pain. To ignore a bad tooth or infection in the mouth could result in heart problems, blood poisoning and fatality if not looked after.

I know it's a hard decision when one has personally had a bad dental experience, but I think you have to have faith that everything will go well. Check out another vet if you're aren't uncomfortable with the one you don't like. A good vet will have your cat's best interests at heart and will consider that every cat is "special" to its owner. All the best!
 

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A veterinary dentist! Either a DVM boarded in veterinary dentistry, or a fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry. I work for a vet who is both. What he can do for animals is phenomenal and his pain control methods are top notch. His patients never wake up distressed and always recovery very well. Its expensive, but well worth the end result.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Oooh, a vet dentist...that sounds very promising. It's worth it to pay more to have faith. I like this a lot more than most :) Thanks!
 
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