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I read about 15% of my cats raw food diet should consist of sideproducts like eggs, yoghurt and even some vegetables.

I give him a small birds egg 2 to 3 times a week mixed with his meat. However his poop of that meal the next day is always really soft diarree like instead of the normal hard elastic ones he gets from eating the meat and bones.

Is this normal? He doesn't seem sick but it seems awkward to me!
 

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Paul36 said:
I read about 15% of my cats raw food diet should consist of sideproducts like eggs, yoghurt and even some vegetables.

I give him a small birds egg 2 to 3 times a week mixed with his meat. However his poop of that meal the next day is always really soft diarree like instead of the normal hard elastic ones he gets from eating the meat and bones.

Is this normal? He doesn't seem sick but it seems awkward to me!
I don't know where you got that info, Paul, but I've never heard such a thing. Cats have no biological need for vegetable (or fruits or grains), and can't properly digest them. Eggs are offered once in a while here, but I split two eggs between five cats. I don't know how cats would benefit from yogurt.

If the amount of egg you're feeding is causing loose stools, cut it back a bit. If you're feeding multiple eggs, feed one less. If you're only offering one egg, feed just the yolk instead of the whole egg.

Try that for a while and let us know how it goes!

(If you don't mind, where did you hear of this 15% "sideproducts" offering?" I'm always curious where information comes from. Thanks!)
 

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I give my cats egg about every 2 weeks or so. Like Auntie Crazy I split 2 eggs, between 4 cats. I just beat it up and pour it over their meal.

Auntie Crazy said:
I don't know how cats would benefit from yogurt.
Actually, yogurt has probiotic bacteria in it. Just like it helps our digestive system it can help theirs too. However, since cats are lactose intolerant they can't have very much. If one of mine gets diarrhea, or gas or w/e, i give them about a teaspoon twice a day until they feel better. Clears it up nice and quick. Too much of it though would likely cause diarrhea because of the lactose. I usually just buy a small single serving container of the organic stuff when I do. They really like it mixed into their meals as well.

It's fine to mix some things in, once in a while. But don't do it too often. Maybe give some egg, but make the rest into breakfast for yourself. Mine get a 'treat' meal about once a week where i put something yummy on top. Egg, yogurt, a little Parmesan cheese, wet cat food, ect. The key is I put it one top of the actual meal.
 

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Cats do not need yogurt. Their GI tracts are full of beneficial bacteria and they cannot process lactose, so avoid that entirely. A cat on antibiotics can be given acidophilus/bifidus, etc. in a NON-dairy formula (most health food stores have it in powder form).

Cats have no need of vegetables at all.

Egg is fine, but in SMALL amounts. When I give egg, maybe once a week, I mix one egg up well and divide it between 3 cats, along w/ some other stuff. I would NOT give a cat a whole egg.
 

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Just want to add that normally yogurt contains lactase, the enzyme needed to digest lactose. So as far as the dairy rule for cats they can eat some and be fine. Though, IMO, it should be limited to just an occasional treat.
 

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Glad to hear you are feeding raw. Best food for them.

Cats with gastro issues may not be able to digest raw egg well. I feed my cats the yolk portion only for their B vitamins. I use 3 yolks for 8 lbs of meat/organ/bone, so very small amounts. The whites should be lightly cooked as they contain avidin which can bind to biotin and prevent it from being absorbed.
 

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love4himies said:
The whites should be lightly cooked as they contain avidin which can bind to biotin and prevent it from being absorbed.
Not true unless (1) they are fed alone (as opposed to with the yolk) or (2) they are fed in large quantities. Again, egg in SMALL quantities is fine. But I would never feed a whole meal of egg.
 

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hoofmaiden said:
love4himies said:
The whites should be lightly cooked as they contain avidin which can bind to biotin and prevent it from being absorbed.
Not true unless (1) they are fed alone (as opposed to with the yolk) or (2) they are fed in large quantities. Again, egg in SMALL quantities is fine. But I would never feed a whole meal of egg.

Well it is true that they contain avidin which can bind to biotin and prevent it from being absorbed. And yes it is very dangerous in large quantities but to be safe it should be lightly cooked to be safe.

http://www.catinfo.org/makingcatfood.ht ... ngredients

http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm ... 00&aid=711

Cats have the highest requirement for B complex vitamins per pound than any other carnivore, so to allow as much to be absorbed as possible is best.
 

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hoofmaiden said:
love4himies said:
The whites should be lightly cooked as they contain avidin which can bind to biotin and prevent it from being absorbed.
Not true unless (1) they are fed alone (as opposed to with the yolk) or (2) they are fed in large quantities. Again, egg in SMALL quantities is fine. But I would never feed a whole meal of egg.
Egg white does contain avidin. Avidin can and does bind with biotin, preventing absorption of said biotin. Cooking the egg white will stop this process.

Of course, you can also separate the white from the yolk and feed either one or the other. :D
 

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Sure -- in small amounts. I split an egg 3 ways once a week, added to whatever they're getting (I mix it up well first, of course). Too much can cause diarrhea for sure.
 

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love4himies said:
Well it is true that they contain avidin which can bind to biotin and prevent it from being absorbed.
A little more info on this: The problem with raw whites really IS only if they are fed alone. Egg YOLK contains a LOT of biotin, far more than can be bound by the avidin in the white, and it takes months or even years of eating lots of whites while simultaneously failing to take in sufficient biotin to cause a biotin deficiency. Since a raw-fed cat's diet contains more than enough biotin, this isn't an issue, particularly if the biotin-rich yolks are fed with the whites.

But again, I wouldn't make eggs a huge part of the diet anyway. Split one once a week between a few cats. That's plenty.
 

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hoofmaiden said:
...A little more info on this: The problem with raw whites really IS only if they are fed alone. Egg YOLK contains a LOT of biotin, far more than can be bound by the avidin in the white, and it takes months or even years of eating lots of whites while simultaneously failing to take in sufficient biotin to cause a biotin deficiency. Since a raw-fed cat's diet contains more than enough biotin, this isn't an issue, particularly if the biotin-rich yolks are fed with the whites...
Hoofmaiden, you might want to think a little more about your posts before you submit them.

The biotin/avidin reaction has been the subject of many, many studies due to the scientifically notable strength of the binding. An extremely quick google search reveals multiple pages of results and the very first one I clicked on (dated 1946, no less) http://www.jbc.org/content/165/1/383.full.pdf ends with this line: "The yolk of an egg is rich in biotin, but the white usually contains more than enough avidin to inactivate the yolk biotin."

Raw feeders: Eggs are a great once a week addition to a cats diet, but either feed the yolk alone, or lightly cook the egg whites and feed them both (I lightly cook mine).
 

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Well, I've read studies saying the opposite. Either way, if all you were feeding was raw eggs, yes, you'd get into trouble with this. But since, hopefully, no one is doing that, and since there are good amounts of biotin in most of the other stuff we are feeding, it's really not much of a risk.

Again, I think that people here tend to freak out unnecessarily over these things. Wild canids have been eating raw eggs from nests for millenia. Since they are just one part of a varied diet, they have no ill effect. If we feed our captive carnivores the same way, we'll have the same result. :)
 

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I always slightly cook egg whites because I want to give my cats the most nutrients possible out of the egg yolk. Plus half mine won't eat the white unless it is cooked :lol:

Mine are fine with a bit over a whole egg a week.
 
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