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Discussion Starter #1
12 x 16 = 192 x 3% = 5.76 x 7 = 40.32 ounces p/week

32.3 ounces meat p/week [4.6 per day - three meals a day - 1.54 per meal.]
4.03 ounces bone p/week
2.02 ounces liver p/week
2.02 ounces non-liver organ p/week

Does this look about right for a 12-pound cat? [the average weight of a cat, I'm going to use these calculations as a reference for when I get a cat.]
 

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I just started my kitties on raw but it looks like a good starting point to me. I think it is good to have a baseline like this and then you can change it according to your individual cats needs. When I did it for my dog I had to look at how her body was responding to what I was feeding her and use that to formulate the percentages that worked for her. My kittens are still eating partially canned so I haven't seen what is the response of their body on 100% raw and what needs to be tweaked.

Good luck! Maybe some more experienced raw feeders will have some better insights for you.
 

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The only thing I see with that where it wouldn't be "complete" is that the only secreting organ listed is liver. I would consider heart and gizzard as "meat" rather than "organ" because they are non secreting. Other secreting organs being like kidney, pancreas, thymus, or spleen. Are you getting a kitten or an adult? Did you see my thread below? I got some really good advice on starting my kittens on raw. I believe it was Librarychick who recommended the whole mice. I don't know if that is something you want to try but my kitties have really taken to it and it has given me some peace of mind to know they are getting all those glands and organs.

I think you could feed that as part of a rotation that included other secreting organs but if you wanted to do it as a sole food you might want to add some supplements, like those suggested by Dr. Pierson.
 

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Do you happen to know of any high-quality, reliable canned foods that aren't extremely expensive? [As many have noted that you have to transition a cat from dry to canned, then from canned to raw.]
 

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For canned I am feeding a combo of Nature's Variety Instinct, Wellness (grain free but not Core), and Dave's. The Nature's Variety is about 4 dollars a can (13 oz) where I am, the Wellness is around 3 dollars a can (12 oz), and the Dave's around 2 dollars a can. Iike the Instinct because it is free of carageenan and guar gum and has a variety of proteins available but it is expensive. Hound and Gatos is another brand many like but I can't speak to it's price. If the kitty is picky though you may try just a bunch of different kinds to see what they like. If you are transtioning an adult kitty maybe those grinds like what you linked are a good idea because they will have a similar texture to canned food.
 

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It was me that suggested the mice :) If you get an adult cat, Roseate, you might have a tougher time convincing it to eat mice than Smaughunter did with her kittens though. Adults cat sometimes be trickier to switch.

You don't' necessarily need to switch to canned first, then raw. The reason people generally do that is because adults tend to be pickier than kittens and they can have a tough time transferring straight from 'McDonalds' to 'salad', so to speak ;) Some adult cats are garberators and will eat anything, in that case you can switch straight from kibble to raw.

That being said, ask in the 'health & nutrition' forum, or just do a search there for 'good canned food' and you'll find TONS of good brands to look out for in your area. Quite a few of our members in the US buy online because they find it's cheaper - but I wouldn't go stocking up before you've got the kitty. You could end up with stacks of cans they won't touch!
 

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Thanks! I plan on getting an adult cat, which is why I'm prepared for a difficult switch.

Let's say that the cat was a stray before arriving at the shelter, would it likely be easier to switch this cat to raw [assuming that it likely hunted mice/rats/etc. while feral] than one that was fed dry all its life?
 
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