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I’ve been talking about getting a dog for a while – and while I research and wait for one to become available – I’m getting just a tab bit nervous.

I won’t probably get him/her for a while… so not rushing! Hehe.

I felt the really nervous when I first brought Halifax home. It took me a good week to finally calm down around him. If the same scenerio played out - would that affect how I bonded with my dog or what?

I’ve just never owned one before except through family dogs. I just want to ask a lot of advice before I really screwed something up by acting all funny.
 

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What kind of dog do you want to get? Join a forum
like this with others who have dogs and that would
give you a head start. I belong to a greyhound forum
since I want to adopt a greyhound in the near future.
Ive learned alot and they are all very supportive of
each other and lots of imformation there
 

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DOgs do pick up on feelings of anxiety and fear. I don't think it will affect how you bond if you get a confident, friendly dog, who will more than likely try to comfort you. Why is it you feel so nervous and scared?
 

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I think I know what you mean. :) I have had cats my ENTIRE life, but my mom doesn't like dogs....so I had no experience with dogs before I got Howie. I had only lived with ONE dog, a beagle puppy we had for 8 months and then had to re-home. I was a vet tech, so I WORKED with dogs all the time...but thats a lot different than actually having one in your home! And they ARE very different. I know when we first brought Howie home I was all paranoid about a million things. He was old, and I kept watching his chest to see if he was breathing. He came to us already trained, so I wasn't TOO worried about that, but I had no idea how I would go about training him if he turned out not to be. I had no idea how often he would need to go out, so I took him out like, every two minutes for the first week. I kept wondering if he was eating enough or if he was drinking too much or too little. I worried about how much he slept. I was also so worried that he would feel scared or lonely in his new home. And yes, I'm sure he DID pick up on what a basket case I was. :lol: I truly believe, that on some level, he knew that he was my first dog and that I was a nervous wreck and had no clue what to do...and that he tried to help ME through those first weeks as much as I tried to help him. He just went ahead and patiently let me take him out a million times a day, and everything else I did....I'm sure he was laughing to himself. :roll: :lol: Pretty soon, you won't be able to remember what your life was life before you had your dog, and dog-owning will come just as easily to you as cat owning...I promise. :)

Here is mine:

 

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emma_pen said:
DOgs do pick up on feelings of anxiety and fear. I don't think it will affect how you bond if you get a confident, friendly dog, who will more than likely try to comfort you. Why is it you feel so nervous and scared?
I know this sounds really dumb... but I'm worried that I might not be a good enough mom for them. Little worries like: What if I don't feed him enough? What if I feed him the wrong thing? What if he gets sick - how will I know? Will I be able to train him correctly even with classes?

I also spent a good deal of time with Halifax when he first came here. I sat in the bathroom with him and played with him (nearly shaking the entire time because I was afraid I would hurt him). I read to him a little too (that helped a bit). But I was worried I might not be able to train him to be a good boy and make him happy.

I got over it eventually - but I think the process is going to start over with a pup - my stomach is doing bellyflops just thinking about it hehe.

Pretty much - just like Ianthe hehe.
 

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You know what? If you are that nervous about it, a GSD may not be the right match for you. They need a guardian who is definitely confident and experienced. Not to say that you can't do it, I just don't think I'd really recommend one to the novice dog owner. I wasn't thinking about that before.
 

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Oooh, I didn't realise you were after a Shepherd. I'd probably agree with AddFran on her note regarding the breed - they really do need confident, firm owners. What traits are you looking for in a dog?

Ems x
 

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i was like that when i first got Sora, my cockatiel. i brought him home, and i was so afraid he wouldn't eat or drink, because going more than 12 hours without food is deadly to a parrot, as their metabolisms are so high. i sat with him in the living room with a bowl of seeds and a bowl of water and kept offering things to him to make sure he ate. then he was sneezing. he sneezed several times a day, and i freaked out and kept calling the pet store, i cried, and was so worried i wouldn't be able to take care of him. the pet store said that if there really was something wrong with him, they would take him back. i kept him for a week, the whole time, i would keep him on my shoulder, and i was afraid to move too fast thinking he might fall off and hurt himself. i finally got over all that. now i know he's not nearly as fragile as i seemed to think, i can walk normally without being hunched over while he's on my shoulder, and he will hang on just fine, and if he does happen to lose his grip, he has wings.
 

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I felt the same way about Scamp when he came here. I am NOT a dog person, and I was freaked about trying to introduce the dog and cat, as well as what would happen if I couldn't handle him. I deliberately chose an elderly, cat-savvy dog to minimize both the stress and the length of my commitment time. I did a huge amount of reading on dog body language, too, in an attempt to get out of my cat-centric way of thinking.

As it turned out, the dog was a trooper, great with the cat, and I was really not too bad with him (actually, he prefered me to my husband, which was really odd), but the cat was having NONE of it. I'm kind of ashamed to admit that another factor in the dog choice was that he was a Sheltie, and my neighbors are collie people who also love Shelties, so I figured that they'd be a good resource if I had problems...as it turned out, Scamp ended up going to live with them, and couldn't be happier (even if he has turned into a hyperactive bossy-boots now that he's on the proper meds), and Assumpta couldn't be happier that the dog is gone. :roll:

But what I concentrated on was finding a dog who had a track record as an easygoing, mellow individual. I didn't mind a dog with health issues (which Scamp had plenty of), but I sure as heck wanted one who was well-behaved and easy to work with my first time out. You'd do best to tailor your search to dogs that suit your ability and lifestyle as a first-time owner. A more dominant dog that needs confident handling will end up walking all over you. Shelties are by NO means my dream dog, but as a totally inexperienced owner in love with a HUGE breed with a reputation for being somewhat difficult to train, I decided to put off my wolfhound dreams until I knew what I was doing and how the cat would really react to a full-time dog resident (not well, as it turned out). To do otherwise wouldn't have been fair to anyone involved. I went looking for an older shelter dog with basic training and a well-known history of being good with cats...I found one, I just didn't count on the cat's reaction based on her previous history of dealing with dogs. Good thing I didn't drop a couple grand on that Wolfhound, or I would have been in a real pickle.

Put the dream dog to one side if it doesn't suit your current ability and lifestyle, and look for the dog that suits you best. Doesn't mean that the dream dog will never come, it just means that when it does come, you'll be completely prepared and ready to provide the home it deserves.
 

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AddFran said:
You know what? If you are that nervous about it, a GSD may not be the right match for you. They need a guardian who is definitely confident and experienced. Not to say that you can't do it, I just don't think I'd really recommend one to the novice dog owner. I wasn't thinking about that before.
I actually don't know what dog I want yet - that's why I am researching a lot of different breeds and breeders. :D

I dunno why - I just get so nervous when I think of having any type of new dog or animal hehe. I am definitly attracted to smart dogs though - and calm ones as well. I'm thinking my nervousness will go away in about a weeks time hopefully. Anyone have any tips on how to feel more comfortable around the dog/pup at first? Deep breathing? Hitting my head with a stick until I calm down? :lol: Maybe if I read more about larger dogs I won't feel so weird... hm...
 

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You know what might be helpful to you, is to volunteer with local dog rescue groups. It will help you get acquainted better with all types of breeds while getting more comfortable with them in general.

I still do it and it's so rewarding. In fact I was a dog handler at an adoption event this past Saturday. Fell in love with my dog of course, but BF would KILL me if I came home with another!
 

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My advice would be to start with kind of a "beginner" dog, the way I did. I knew I was nervous, and should probably learn the basic ropes of having a dog first, before I got one of the breeds I would like to eventually own....a Boxer, Pitbull, or German Shepherd. I purposely went looking for an older, mature dog, who had some training and a mellow personality. (and that wasn't huge). The funny thing is that Howie was going to be our "practice dog", and now, I almost wish I could breed him, so I could own a Howie (Cocker Spaniel/retriever/Australian SHepherd mix) forever....he has become my favorite breed. :D
 

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Mitts & Tess said:
That is such a sweet story Ianthe..
Thanks. :) I love sharing and re-telling it, in the hope that perhaps I can convince just ONE person of the joys of adopting an all-american mutt off death row. (And Howie had been deemed unadoptable, because of his age....we are going on our 4th year with him, and they have been some of the best 4 years we have had. :) )
 

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Jack is having Dominance issues with the children. I have tried and tried to rehabilitate this. He is a really really good dog. He has excellent bite inhibition. My problem is that I cannot continue being SuperWoman.
I cant be in every room at every second. So when I cant supervise he has to be in crate and its not fair. He is a really great house dog with superb house manners...I honestly dont see how Jack is going to make it through 1 more toddler. He is snarling at them regularly now....he does not trust them and he has every right not to.
This behavior in him has really increased since last summer after he was hit by a car. He is completely paranoid to be touched in his hind area. His hips and tail and tummy. He has been X-rayed and he is perfect!
But not in his mind. Here is some links to the injuries he had.



He had alot of stitches and they had to sew his man parts back in place.
I had to rub cream on it twice a day and he just has not been the same since.....he will allow my husband and me to give him tummy rubs.
But kids...NO WAY! Forget it! It's not his fault....he is not a bad dog.
 
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