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Ioana,
It truly depends on the kitty. If you want her to wear a collar around the house you can try putting one on her and watch her closely. If she triesd to struggle to take it off I wouldn't leave it on while you are not there watching because the y try to bite it off and it could get stuck in their mouth and she wouldn't be able to get it off without your help and she would be left without being able to eat or drink until you got there. They can injure themselves in a panic if it got stuck in their mouth. So I recommend that you watch her closely and see how it goes.
 

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It's a catch 22 to put a collar and a name tag on a cat. If the cat never gets out, it isn't necessary, but if the cat has a collar and climbs a tree the cats could get strangled or hanged. Yet it's the outside/inside cat that needs ID. I put one on my Blueberry for a couple of years, but it was just because I thought he looked cute. He's never been outside.
 

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Thank you Bengalsownme and Jeanie. I am going to put all of the info you gave me into consideration before I make any decisions. His safety comes first + he is going to be beautiful in my eyes no matter what he looks like ever. I just think the idea of the little jingle bell is cute. Now that I think of it it may be stressful for him to hear that every time he moves...it would make sense if a kitty went outside and hid somewhere and be hard to find
 

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Jeanie said:
It's a catch 22 to put a collar and a name tag on a cat. If the cat never gets out, it isn't necessary, but if the cat has a collar and climbs a tree the cats could get strangled or hanged. Yet it's the outside/inside cat that needs ID. I put one on my Blueberry for a couple of years, but it was just because I thought he looked cute. He's never been outside.
Whenever I buy Jet a collar I always make sure it is an elasticated one, so he doesn't get strangled if it gets caught on a branch.
 

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I don't let my cats outside because I live right off a state-route. And it's busy! Where I used to live, my cats were outside-inside cats. My grandma didn't want them to stay inside all the time, because they'd drive her nuts. Bad part of it is, Socks lost her tail, and Thunder(mine!!) lost his leg..! We have no idea how this happened either. I told her that Thunder isn't allowed outside anymore. But did she listen? No. Then my other cat, JBC, got hit by a car... I've had bad experiences with inside-outside cats. Now she's starting to let my sisters housecat out..! She lives somewhat in the country, but not far from a state route also.!
 

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Inside

this is my article i wrote on why's and how's of indoor cats.

Some links might be outdated as I have not updated it in a while.

Many people like me are indoor cat owners who deeply love these delightful animals. However we realize that pets are a responsibility and that pets can both cause damage and face great danger when allowed to roam. Dog owners have long been bound with leash laws and fences. Why would cats deserve any less protection and cat owners any less responsibility?

Roaming cats have the risk of contracting Toxoplasmosis from eating prey. This can then be passed onto humans causing illness and even death in extreme cases. Toxoplasmosis has also been found to be dangerous to pregnant women and can cause birth defects and other problems. Cat feces in children's sandboxes and flower gardens increases the chance of transmission to humans. Cats running at large can also cause traffic accidents as motorists swerve to miss hitting one on the road. Roaming cats also often harass indoor cats, through windows etc, sometimes causing anxiety and negative behavior such as spraying.

Furthermore roaming cats can bring home other unpleasant things like worms, ticks and parasites. One particularly nasty infestation is that of the bot-fly and other burrowing larvae. The cats and other animals can be infested with larvae that live beneath the skin festering, often referred to as warbles. See this link for an example: http://www.ifas.ufl.edu/~fsj/botfly/cut ... trwrb1.htm

In addition to the risks faced by humans, cats themselves face a great number of dangers by roaming outside unsupervised. Cats can be killed by cars, antifreeze, wild animals, abusive humans, or even be caught in traps. Cats also face a host of dangerous diseases and parasites. Feline Imnodeficiency Virus has no vaccine and no cure and attacks the cats immune system and is eventually fatal. Feline Leukemia Virus is another risk and although a vaccine exists it is not 100% effective. Upper Respiratory Disease is yet another risk and is extremely contagious. It can lead to symptoms such as; fever, mouth ulcers, eye infections, blindness, lameness and diarrhea. There are several other diseases such as Rabies, Feline Infectious Peritonitis and Feline Panleukopenia that do have a vaccine but remain risky for unvaccinated cats of ones with lapsed vaccine schedule.

And finally in addition to the risks faced by cats and humans, unsupervised cats are responsible for the deaths of many wild animals. Birds such as the protected Blue bird can fall prey to these felines. Biologists and experts have indicated that cat predation is a serious environmental threat. See “Cat Predation of Birds and Other Wildlife
http://www.abcbirds.org/cats/catsindoors.htm


For more information on responsible cat ownership, risk factors faced by outdoor cats and information on the impact of felines on wild life please see the following websites:
http://www.abcbirds.org/catindoo.htm
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Poin ... doors.html

Cats can and do live happy indoor lives. I converted my cat to indoors only when she was already over 6 years old. I provide a stimulating environment of toys, climbing apparatuses, attention and so forth. Homemade cat climbing trees can be found at:
http://www.netcat.org/links.html#S

How to make an outdoor cat an happy indoor one:
http://maxshouse.com/Healthy+Happy_Indoors.htm

http://www.sdnhm.org/exhibits/cats/indoors.html

If you still want to allow some access there are other alternatives. Options instead of having a pet unsupervised outdoors: leash training, converted backyard, cat enclosure etc.
Kitty clips:
http://members.aol.com/kittyklips
Cat enclosures:
http://www.lisaviolet.com/cathouse/backyard.html (enclosed backyard design)
http://cust3.iamerica.net/catfence/ (Affordable Cat Fence)
http://www.feralcat.com/fence.html
http://www.alleycat.org/ic_fs_fence.html
more enclosures:
http://www.ballarat.net.au/catnip/index.htm
Build your own cat run: http://www.vaxxine.com/stacey/nafa/infocat/enclosures/
Commercially available enclosures
People without the time or tools to construct enclosures for their cats can order a variety of pre-made pens, runs and window boxes.
From Sears: an 8' x 4' x 4' galvanized wire exercise pen (Cat. #60023)
From General Cage Corporation: a folding, portable, three-story pen available for $110 (US--price may have changed) through mail order catalogues, or write manufacturer at 238 N 29th Street, Elwood, IN, 46036, USA.
From Anibode: custom-designed window boxes. Write 339 Pape Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M4M 2W9, Canada.

These are possible books to consult.
Housecat : How to Keep Your Indoor Cat Sane and Sound Christine Church / Hardcover / Published 1998
The Indoor Cat : How to Understand, Enjoy, and Care for House Cats Patricia Curtis, Audrey A. Hayes / Paperback / Published 1997

Indoor Cats : Understanding and Caring for Your Indoor Cat Katrin Behrend, et al / Paperback / Published 1995
 
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