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I could really use some advice. To start, I have a six month old cat, and a dog who is about five years old. I have a doggy door that he uses to go in and out.

Recently, my cat who had previously shown no interest in the doggy door went outside. I've closed it for now, but I can't keep it closed forever, I need to think of another solution that will let the dog in and out and keep the cat inside. I am not home enough to keep the dog door closed completely for good. He has to be able to go outside, and I absolutely don't want her out there.

So far what I am considering is either an indoor fence type thing that emits a noise when she goes near it, or an infra-red door that will be keyed only to the dog so she can't get out of it. I am going to start this weekend by trying to deter her from the doggy door area with a loud noise whenever she goes near, or a squirt of water if she walks outside, but I need something more permanent. Does anyone have any experience with the fence or electronic dog door or have any other ideas for me?

Juli
 

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Juli

Sorry Juli I can't help you. But what you are doing sounds pretty good. I don't have a dog, and so then I am in no need for a doggy door. I hope that you have good luck with your solution! Wanna be friends?
 

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I think the doggie doors with the keys work pretty well. The infra-red ones are pretty expensive though.

They sell two types. One that requires a simple magnetic collar, but if another animal in your neighborhood also has a magnetic collar they could get into your house too.

The other has a infra-red signal (not just a plain magnet) that opens the door, this one will only work with your pets collar, no one elses.

Here are links to these products (I don't know if you can buy them elsewhere for cheaper.):

Magnetic Collar Doggie Door

Key Collar Doggie Door

There's lots of different brands, those were just some examples. You just need to make sure that it locks the cat IN. Some only lock from the outside (anybody can go out but only animals with a key can come in).
 

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Kitty's Mom

You mad an excellent point.

Why hadn't I thought of that?

Well I guess because I'm thirteen, and you are most likely a lot older than I am.
 

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I'm glad someone asked this question. We have a 4 month old puppy right now and are getting another puppy in the next 6 months. We should be in our house in the next few months. Right now we are in a condo. Whenever the puppy goes out it is on a leash. My boyfriend really wants to get a doggy door for the dog. I of course am terrified that the cats will get out. He keeps telling me they have ones that are harder to open, so the cats won't be able to push it open. He has a friend who has one that is like that. I'm going to go over and check it out and see. I was thinking of the infr-red signal. Of course I wonder if the cats could still sneak out. Then how would they get back in?

So Juli...have you researched anything about them yet? Did you have any success keeping the kitty away from the doggy door area?
 

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There was a post awhile back on this forum about a member having problems with animals that weren't hers coming in through the doggy door.

I agree with having the door locked to not allow any but those with key collars to come in.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I looked into the electronic doggy doors quite a bit, but it seemed like the cat could simply walk out after the dog because they stay open so long. You would have the same issue with a heavy doggy door. One of the dogs that lives here is a small dog, and wouldn't be able to push open one of the heavy doggy doors. I read reviews on the doggy doors also, and it did not seem like they were very effective, and they also malfunctioned and did not work properly quite often. They didn't have very positive reviews. If your cats aren't particularly curious about the door and going outside it would probably work. But once they see the dogs doing it, they will probably want to see where they are going and try it out.

The dogs are not mine, but because they lived here first they have the higher priority and I am not allowed to simply close off the doggy door (I live with my mom while I am going to college). My solution would have been to not have a doggy door in the first place at all. The dogs do not spend much time outdoors at all, and really prefer being inside. They are also housebroken. My mom and my little brother just can't be bothered to let the dogs out once in awhile, and think its "very unfair for them to be stuck inside."

So my solution to this problem was to get an indoor electronic fence. It is a disc shaped object that comes with a receiver collar. It works like this: The cat wears the receiver collar, and when she gets near the doggy door she gets a sound warning. If she continues to stand near the doggy door, she will get a small shock.

It has many settings, and I have not used a shock setting yet. She just gets a warning sound when she goes near the doggy door. I don't expect this to work forever, and I will probably need to turn it on the lowest level shock. I tested it on myself, and it feels like a static shock - the sort that you get when you walk on the carpet and touch something metal. It's not painful, just suprising. Eventually with this system, she will not approach the doggy door at all and she will not have to wear the collar anymore. I don't expect it to take more than a couple of weeks.

I don't really advocate this method, because I don't think it is very humane, but it is a better solution than her going outside. Some of you may remember that I had another cat named Owen, he actually belonged to my brother and was allowed outside, against my wishes. On July 7th he went missing, and despite extensive searching, posting of signs, and visiting all the shelters daily, we have not found him. There are canyons quite a few streets behind us, where there are coyotes. Anything could have happened to him, it could have been the coyotes, or someone could have simply taken him because he was a very nice looking cat. I will absolutely not allow my other cat to go outside under any circumstances, which is why I am going to this length to make sure that she stays indoors.

Some of you may not agree with this method, and I absolutely understand why. I don't like it very much either, but when you have to have a dog and a cat, where the cat needs to be in and the dog out, it is effective. It works.

The downside is obviously that it does shock her, even if it is a very light shock. The receiver on the collar is also quite large. The website advertised it as being for cats 5lbs and up. My cat is 6 pounds and it looks pretty big on her. She wears it okay though, and it doesn't seem to bother her much. Hopefully, I'll be able to take if off in a couple of weeks. It is also pretty expensive, $150, which is more than most of the doggy doors I looked at. I wish that there was a better product for this problem, but there's just not many solutions available out there. In my opinion, no doggy door is still the best way to go.
 

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I have one of the electric catflaps for my guys.
Mine only opens while the cat has the collar up on it. It is electric magnetic, so as soon as the cat goes it locks again.

I have only had 2 problems.

1)My cat was dumb enough to sit up on the catflap when strays got close, therefore unlocking the catflap and letting them in. (My thinking the dog may do this)

2)When we had the kittens they were sneaky buggers in wanting to get out! When ever one of my adult cats went in or out, they would get virtually ontop of them and go out at the same time.

Otherwise they are great :)
 
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