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Elmo my glowlight tetra died this morning. I am upset. *crying* *crying really hard*. Becky my serpae is flipping out, going on her side, hitting the bottom but she looks fine and her breathing is fine. She just won't eat either. :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:
 

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Catlover, is this your new tank? Have you used any chemicals, such as water clarifier in the tank? Tetras can be quite sensitive. Perhaps a gradual water change would help. I don't want to upset you, but it's possible that Becky will also die. I know how you feel. I treasure life, and am heartbroken to see any living thing die. However, with fish, it happens, and we have no choice but get used to this loss or give up the hobby. I wish you the very best of luck.

I lost a whole tank of fish to a water clarifier. The aquarium store duplicated the conditions, the water ph, the temperature, and the same fish, and they all died. The company paid for the loss of my fish. I never used a water clarifier again, although the problem might have been a dropper top that was too big. I just didn't trust the product again. I was very a experienced hobbyist at that time. Still, it was very upsetting. :(
 

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Jeanie said:
Catlover, is this your new tank? Have you used any chemicals, such as water clarifier in the tank? Tetras can be quite sensitive. Perhaps a gradual water change would help. I don't want to upset you, but it's possible that Becky will also die. I know how you feel. I treasure life, and am heartbroken to see any living thing die. However, with fish, it happens, and we have no choice but get used to this loss or give up the hobby. I wish you the very best of luck.

I lost a whole tank of fish to a water clarifier. The aquarium store duplicated the conditions, the water ph, the temperature, and the same fish, and they all died. The company paid for the loss of my fish. I never used a water clarifier again, although the problem might have been a dropper top that was too big. I just didn't trust the product again. I was very a experienced hobbyist at that time. Still, it was very upsetting. :(
Well, Becky also died this afternoon. :cry: I used AquaSafe for the tank. It is my new tank.
 

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Awe...Dont cry!

Just dont add any new fish....the water is very unstable.
Even if all the fish die....do not change all of the water.
Change only 1/4 to 1/3 of it. This is a very normal cycling of water.
The fish need friendly bacteria....new tanks are very sterile.
If the fish are swimming and diving and bashing into things....the nitrates are too high. Which is caused by over feeding and their is not enough friendly bacteria cycled in the water yet to balance out the nitrates and ammonia.

I hope this made sense...I am trying to explain it simple like.
 

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Test the water to see what is off. Maybe the water needed to be cycled longer before the fish were put in. Don't worry though, this happens alot with fish and I know how sad you must be
 

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Oh gosh...I'm sorry. :( It is probably 1 of things- either the fish were sick to start of with (by the way, are either of the ones that died the one that had the white spot on them?) Or, it could be the water, which is probably more likely. Unfortunately, a brand new tank is often a death trap for your first fish. :? There is no escaping the cycling period, and fish often do not survive the process. Please don't get discouraged, though....once the tank has done it's cycling thing, any fish you get should do very well. *HUGS*

PS- Do you have any water testing strips? They are fairly inexpensive, and would allow you to monitor your water. Then you would know if it is safe or not. :)
 

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Misery said:
Fish are so hard to keep alive. Tetras are just one group of impossible fish to keep alive. The only fish we've been able to keep alive longer than a year is a cory cat. He's over 5 years old and still kicking. Otherwise, they are a royal pain.

This is a bit of a pessimistic reply. I have kept fish as pets for over 10 years, and I find them very enjoyable and alot of fun, NOT "A royal Pain". Also, if you are having that much trouble keeping your fish alive, you are probably doing something wrong or not giving them the proper conditions. No fish is "impossible to keep alive", especially not tetras....I have a tetra right now who is a year old, and I had a group of tetras live to be almost 4.
 

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This is a bit of a pessimistic reply. I have kept fish as pets for over 10 years, and I find them very enjoyable and alot of fun, NOT "A royal Pain". Also, if you are having that much trouble keeping your fish alive, you are probably doing something wrong or not giving them the proper conditions. No fish is "impossible to keep alive", especially not tetras....I have a tetra right now who is a year old, and I had a group of tetras live to be almost 4.

I agree! I've had the same fish for over 5 years now AND they are saltwater fish :wink:
 

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there are products containing the beneficial bacteria the tank needs. it takes several weeks to get them started. you could put a snail or two in the tank in the meantime to produce waste to feed the bacteria. snails are pretty hardy creatures.
 

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Ianthe said:
Oh gosh...I'm sorry. :( It is probably 1 of things- either the fish were sick to start of with (by the way, are either of the ones that died the one that had the white spot on them?) Or, it could be the water, which is probably more likely. Unfortunately, a brand new tank is often a death trap for your first fish. :? There is no escaping the cycling period, and fish often do not survive the process. Please don't get discouraged, though....once the tank has done it's cycling thing, any fish you get should do very well. *HUGS*

PS- Do you have any water testing strips? They are fairly inexpensive, and would allow you to monitor your water. Then you would know if it is safe or not. :)
Yes they had the white spot but that is nothing. That is just part of their color. Thanks Ianthe for sending me *Hugs*. *Hugs*
This is a bit of a pessimistic reply. I have kept fish as pets for over 10 years, and I find them very enjoyable and alot of fun, NOT "A royal Pain". Also, if you are having that much trouble keeping your fish alive, you are probably doing something wrong or not giving them the proper conditions. No fish is "impossible to keep alive", especially not tetras....I have a tetra right now who is a year old, and I had a group of tetras live to be almost 4.
I agger about what you said Ianthe!!! Fish are NOT a royal pain. They are enjoable. Misery that is fine if you like cats but this thread isn't about what people like. But it is fine about what you like.
 

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Catlover, I'm sorry you lost your fish. I thought you'd take it badly, which is why I suggested looking into the "fishless cycle."

Do you still have fish left? If so, continue to do small, partial water changes to keep the water as clean as possible for them, but cycling is a very stressful time for the fish.

If you happen to lose the rest of your fish, keep the tank running. Since the fish have added ammonia, the tank is cycling. Every few days, you can take a sample of your water to any petstore, and they will test it for you and tell you when you can start adding fish again.


Personally, I don't think keeping fish is a pain or even difficult. The problem is that people tend not to do all their research first and start off on the wrong foot; they think that they can just add the fish in and all will be well. I've heard so many complaints from people who experienced a mass death in their new tank, and when I try to ask them about it, they're like "No, I did just what it said, I let the tank run for 48 hours before putting the fish in." It took forever (and many deaths) for me to convince my mother that she could not keep doing 100% water changes in her tanks to clean everything :? She finally listened, and she was finally able to keep fish for more than a week.
 

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catlover, I think Misery just wanted to make you feel better. I thoroughly enjoyed the aquarium hobby, and carried it to extremes for years, raising thousands of live bearers and angel fish and traded with the biggest aquarium store in the area. However, there are sometimes problems that arise that even the best care and knowledge can't solve. Of course cats are easier to care for, but once you get your tank balanced and ready to go, I'm sure you'll enjoy it. It is usually a good idea to get the tank going with a corydorus catfish and other hardy fish.

Remember, when you add fish, do not just float the bag in the aquarium. After it has reached the same temperature as the tank, pour out a very small amount of water in the bag, and replace it with a small amount of aquarium water. Continue this over a half hour period. Some fish are very sensitive to even slight water changes. Good luck. :)
 

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Awww *Hugs* I know how hard it is to lose fish. When you get a new tank as people above said it needs to cycle. Cycling is basicly 3 things that need to happen. First your ammonia(whats produced by fish waste) will spike up waaay high. It is toxic and will kill the fish in the tank. Then it will recede as it is converted into nitrIte and the nitrIte will spike high. Then the nitrIte will be converted into NitrAte and it will spike high. NitrAte is not as deadly as nitrIte and ammonia but in large amounts it is still bad. During this process good bacteria will grow in the tank on all surfaces especially the filter and eventually it will be enough good bacteria to easily convert all ammonia to nitrite, nitrite to nitrate, and then reduce the nitrate levels. This process can take up to two months (which is why testing is reccomended) and can and will kill all but the most hardy of fish. For this reason it is reccomended to wait until the cycle is finished to put any fish in the tank.

You can bypass having to wait only by ordering a product called Bio-spira. It is the only one proven time and again to instantly cycle a tank.

Good luck, hope you don't get discouraged, keep trying!!
 

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OMG! I am so sorry, and I totally sympathise. :cry: My favourite guppy Fireball died a month after I got him, he was a character. I cried at school the nexr day. I LOVE fishies, Poor Catlover. I would just about go into mourning if my little Violette died, she's quite the lady. To heck with the three second memory *Sends more hugs* (Just to tell you, pet shops do sell some sick fish, the one I got Gyp from I went to about a month ago and saw three dead fish in a Molly tank and they also sold me four sick dittle darlings, I really get attached to my fish)
For your new tank, here are some instructions that really helped me. First of all, boil the water so you get out some of the chlorine and ick that fish can't stand and leave it for four days under sunlight or a strong artificial light, how long have you kept fishies? I've kept mine for about five months, and the first two times I had a lot of tearshed. The third time, my friend Cora (she taught me everything about fish I know and our fish are siblings) put this blue anti-stress liquid in it and told me that it was because they had been transported in the car and were scared. THe next day Rosey died, which was VERY upsetting and the day after Spots died. The ohter two were attacked and killed by Gyp and Vaivi and so, I have learned, fish are bestkept in pairs, but good luck with the newbies when you get them.
 
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