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My friend and I found a kitten. He decided to keep it. We took her to the vet and she was dewormed. She is was 5 weeks old. We gave her a bath with Dawn to get rid of the fleas. Up until 3 days ago she was fine.

Today my friend had to take her to the vet she had Diarrhea the past 3 days. The vet took a stool sample and he is waiting fr the results. The vet wanted him to keep the kitten there but it was over $1,000 for the night so he could not afford that.

Any ideas on what this is? Any tips to help her. She is lethargic but she she is drinking water and eating small amounts of wet food. He is also administering water to her to help keep her hydrated.

Just looking for some feedback. He gets the results tomorrow from the stool sample and they gave him meds to give her. They believe it could be worms or a bacterial infection.

What are the odds of it being worms she was dewormed once. He is very upset that his baby is sick.
 

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have you checked to see if the kitten is dehydrated? Also, the kitten WAS 5 weeks when he found her or IS five weeks now? How did he find this out? Have you been weighing her?
 

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Just check for dehydration. That can take down a kitten in hours, so you gotta keep an eye on her all the time. If she becomes too dehydrated she'll need fluids through an IV.
Wait for the exam results. If the kitten had/has a poor immune system, it could be anything, from just an upset stomach to giarda (bacterial) or something more serious that we all hope is not the case.

Good luck with everything!
 

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From this website
Feline CRF Information Center - Common Problems Related to CRF

Dehydration
Dehydration is an abnormal depletion of body fluids that is usually a constant problem for CRF cats because the kidneys cannot concentrate urine. The problem becomes more serious with excessive or chronic vomiting and/or diarrhea. To check for dehydration, gently pinch a bit of skin at the back of the cat's neck. When released, it should immediately fall back in place. If it takes a few seconds, it's indicative of loss of elasticity which is a characteristic of dehydration. Another test for dehydration is to touch the cat's gums. They should feel slick. If they feel tacky, the cat is dehydrated. Be aware that only cats who are SERIOUSLY dehydrated show these symptoms. Cats can be significantly dehydrated before clinical signs are obvious. If your cat is dehydrated, you should contact your vet as soon as possible. You may have to begin subcutaneous fluid therapy, or, if you already giving sub-Q fluids, you may need to increase the frequency or volume.
 

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Giardia is not a bacteria, it is a parasite. They are two very different pathogens. Giardia is a single-celled parasite. Worms are parasites, but a typical deworming would not eliminate giardia to the best of my knowledge.

When humans get giardia, we typically call it Traveler's Diarrhea. A healthy human immune system can sometimes overcome giardia on it's own. If a human can't get rid of it, a simple course of antibiotics gets rid of it.

If a tiny kitten has it, it's a whole other ball game. It's a pain in the neck. I hope it's not giardia. I've gone through rounds of antibiotics with my kitten and even though we're finally repeatedly testing negative for giardia (after several prior positive tests and many rounds of meds), the diarrhea is still not 100% resolved.
 

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Sorry, I never meant to say giarda was a bacterium, my post got messed up. Thank you for the correction :)

One of my cats is under treatment for giarda. Yes a pain in the neck, for sure.

Well let's hope your friend's kitten just has an upset stomach!
 
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