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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have wondered about this_not for a special reason but curiosity_ can somebody tell me the drug's name that is used to euthanize cats, I mean stop the heart, not to put him to sleep. I'm asking because I remember reading it's phenobarbital (years ago) :?: Thank-you!
 

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Not sure what the drug is, but I'm pretty sure that phenobarbital is a medicine used to control seizures caused by epilepsy - my friend takes it, and so does my neighbor's dog.
 

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Yep, Phenobarbital is a seizure medication........I would know. :evil:

Not sure what the actual drug is, I worked for a veterinary hospital, and the name of the drug was "Euthanol". It was pink....I'm not sure what combination of drugs was in it, though. I know it worked VERY FAST, in seconds, and was painless.
 

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This was a bit disturbing - I did a Google search for "Euthanol" and it is apparently also the name of a band 8O

And of course, a search for "Euthanasia" produces all kinds of results about euthanizing terminally ill people.

edit: Just realized, it's the name of an album, not a band, but still...
 

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I believe what you are referring to is pentobarbitone sodium. I'm not sure exactly how it works, but I know in small doses it relaxes the body, so I would imagine in a larger quantity it stops the body entirely. It is painless and very quick.
 

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Yup, it looks like it is sodium pentobarbital.
One of the most critical responsibilities of those in the animal care and control field is to provide the most humane death possible for companion animals when euthanasia is necessary. The term "euthanasia" is derived from Greek, meaning "good death." In order to be humane, every euthanasia technique must result in painless, rapid unconsciousness, followed by cardiac or respiratory arrest, and ultimately death. Sodium pentobarbital, injected by well-trained and caring personnel, is the preferred method for providing the most humane death of dogs and cats.
That's from http://www2.redbluffdailynews.com/speci ... nasia.html

Sorry about the rather graphic description. Some of the other sites I got... well, in exotics, such as rabbits and rodents, some of the "humane" techniques don't sound humane at all to me. For instance, rats who are under 10 days old are placed in a plastic bag, have the air sucked out of the bag, CO2 pumped in, and are basically suffocated then decapitated to make sure they're dead. And the site says it's the humane way to do it. 8O And cervical dislocation is suggested for older rodents and rabbits... although they do suggest more humane ways, thankfully. It says when done correctly it is humane, but if done incorrectly... it can cause the animal a lot of suffering.

This is depressing, I'm going to stop...
 

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catobsessed4 said:
This was a bit disturbing - I did a Google search for "Euthanol" and it is apparently also the name of a band 8O

And of course, a search for "Euthanasia" produces all kinds of results about euthanizing terminally ill people.

edit: Just realized, it's the name of an album, not a band, but still...

That IS kind of disturbing. The Euthanol was kept in a locked cabinet, and a few times a week, one of the doctors would come out of an exam room and say"Can someone please get me the pink stuff". Everyone would get quiet for a moment and be somewhat somber for the next few hours. There were times, however, that animals would be euthanized that we knew very well, and in these cases, we would cry right along with the owners.....AWFUL. There was one dog, a doberman, her name was Amanda. She was old, about 11 I think. She had been coming to the hospital her whole life. Her owners had no children, they were infertile, so Amanda was their BABY. Amanda didn't like to be at home alone (she had sep. anxety) so 5 days a week, they would drop her off on their way to work, and pick her up on their way home. She was as much our pet as she was theirs....she loved coming to the hospital for "day care". She had her own huge run, and we all spoiled her rotten. Her cage card was covered in stickers :) She was the very first dog I ever took out for a walk when I started working there. One Sunday night, they called us and said Amanda was going rapidly downhill and couldn't walk, and they had decided to put her to sleep the following day. They offered to leave her for daycare like usual, so we could all have a chance to say goodbye, and then have her put to sleep that evening, after they got off work. They were distraught, they didn't even go to work the next day, but the dropped Amanda off as promised. The entire staff came in, even those that were off that day. Amanda was spoiled as usual, and there wasn't a dry eye among the staff the entire day......luckily we had understanding clients. Around 5 pm, we took her out of her run for the last time. She died in her mommy's arms, my boss (the vet) was crying just as hard as she was. It was AWFUL........but Amanda had a great life, and she is waiting across the bridge.

This got REALLY off track, but what can I say? I get distracted easily. Sorry! :oops:

And guess what? Amanda's mom and dad found out they were pregnant a few months ago!!!!!!!!!!! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank-you all..Jill, I thought I would google it but I was afraid I'd find very disturbing info..sorry you had to go throught it for me! Thanks again
 

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Ianthe, that story made me cry!! :cry:

That's a nice ending, though, that Amanda's parents are pregnant now.

I just applied for a job at a vet's office, and I didn't think about that... it will be upsetting to know that animals are being put down in the next room. :cry:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Oh Jazz what a story..but isn't sad, Amanda had a wonderful life, so much love and her parents found out they'd be parents again..do we want to go into the conclusion :wink:
 

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I like to think that Amanda sent down a baby for her parents from heaven :)

It IS hard, no question. The first few that you witness are the worst. You don't ever get "used" to it, but it does get less difficult, except of course, for exceptions, like Amanda. I don't know at what capacity you will be working in the vets, if you are going to be more of a kennel worker, or helping in the exam rooms with procedures. I was more of a technician, so I was in the rooms, which means that i got the difficult and emotionally hard job of helping to hold animals for the Euthanasia process....definitely not the best part of the job. When you don't now the animal very well, the hardest part is trying to comfort the owners. Especially since I have my own pets, i knew exactly what they were feeling, and you feel SO SORRY for them. The WORST is when you are putting an animal to sleep and it belongs to an elderly person and the animal was all they had left. I will NEVER forgot seeing a 90 year old man sobbing over the body of his dog.....it's also very hard when kids are involved. Then there is the REALLY REALLY NOT FUN part after the euthanasia, where you have to put the body in a body bag, seal it up, label it, and take it to the freezer.

I don't want to scare you off, though!! That is a very small part of what happens at a vet hospital.....the majority of the things are fun, exciting, and often, downright hilarious!!! I ADORED that job with a passion. If I get well enough again, I will be back on their doorstep, begging them to take me back. Which they already told me they would- they became like a second family to me-another great part of the job. I am actually going to a BBQ tomorrow at one of the girl's houses :)
 

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I'm not going to be a technician - just an assitant - it's a small office so I will have a range of jobs... cleaning out cages, organizing the store room, mopping floors, etc... but they said that they may need help holding animals while they give them shots and everything. I'm keeping my fingers crossed that it's not during *those* shots.

edit: There I go again, talking like I've already gotten the job. In reality, I just REALLY REALLY want the job - they're going to call me in the next few days to let me know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
About humane ways of euthanizing..well..I'm familiar with the rats method because it's also done for poultry, I translate literature for a business that partly deals in poultry transport.
Disturbing in any language, believe me.
Sorry for the digression!!!
 

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Here are some of the more fun things that happeed there:

We delivered several litters of puppies and kittens by cesaerian section. They emergency c-sections, so they were stressful at first, but quickly became joyful as the babies were born safely, and each staff member was given a baby to warm up and get started on breathing. *thinking fondly of those first tiny meows*

Once, woman brought in her 4 Siberian Huskies who had gotten into some poison. I think it was rat poison. It had only been about 10 minutes since they ingested it, so we had to make them throw up.ALL of them. I will never forget that afternoon, all of us standing around waiting for these dogs to start puking....then when they did, cleaning up tons and TONS of Husky puke, which was bright blue and all over the entire back treatment area :lol:

We had to artificially inseminate a Great Dane.......the 2 dogs just couldn't seem to figure it out on their own. So we all stood around and laughed hysterically as my boss a big burly guy, had to *ahem* give the male a "hand" in getting the sperm out......use your imagination guys!!!!!! :oops: Then we had to use a turkey baster and inseminate the female, and then hold her up vertically for about 20 minutes to make sure it would take. Geez, that was a funny day.......and yes, they did get puppies :)

One Thanksgving I had to work, it was just me and one other girl. We thought we could come in, take care of everyone, and leave in time to get to our own Thanksgiving dinners......Nope. As we were caring for the 40 or so dogs that were being boarded, we looked up, and out the window, we see about 12-15 dogs coming down the street, heading towards the highway 8O 8O For a second, we were like, hmmmmmm, should we pretend we don't see that? But of course, we couldnt. I had to call my bosses (a husband and wife) at their house, interrupt their dinner, and tell them. At first, they thought I was kidding. The next thing I know, they pull up, still dressed up nice for their Thanksgiving party, and with several of their guests!!!!!!!!!! We all went out, in the pouring RAIN, down by the HIGHWAY, and tried to round up all the dogs. It took a few hours, but we caught them all, and put them in the different exam rooms for the night (all of our cages were full to capacity, remember?) We found out the next day they had all jumped the fence at the kennel they were being boarded at (that kennel has since been shut down!!!!)

And I could go on and on.......it was a WONDERFUL job.
 

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rosalie said:
Sorry for the digression!!!
I think I'm the one that digressed, you just went back to the original topic!

Ianthe, that cheered me up a lot. I was in a rather rotten mood from this forum a few minutes ago - it just seemed like every post I read was a depressing post, or an arguement, or something - but anyway, those were some funny stories!! I think it would be SOOOOO fun to work with newborn puppies and kittens, getting them to breathe... I saw a C-section of a dog on TV once (yes I watch the animal channel, a LOT), and I was actually able to watch - amazing, because I usually pass out at the sight of blood. Now, I was lying down, but still...

Anyway, the only newborn animals I've seen are bunnies. I don't know if I've said it before, but I was the one who found Junior and his seven brothers and sisters the day after they were born. Unfortunately, I was also there when, two days later, it took three of us and a heat lamp to keep reviving one of the poor bunnies, who sadly passed away when we decided it was inhumane to keep reviving her any more (the closest vet that saw bunnies was over a half hour away). But it was somewhat of a blessing, as we would not have had a home for one more to go to (we just barely got homes for the other seven).

Wow, it's almost like I'm TRYING to depress myself today. I better go play with my animals... get in a better mood again...
 

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catobsessed4 said:
I'm not going to be a technician - just an assitant - it's a small office so I will have a range of jobs... cleaning out cages, organizing the store room, mopping floors, etc... but they said that they may need help holding animals while they give them shots and everything. I'm keeping my fingers crossed that it's not during *those* shots.

edit: There I go again, talking like I've already gotten the job. In reality, I just REALLY REALLY want the job - they're going to call me in the next few days to let me know.
You'll be exposed to euthanasias regardless sooner or later. I work as a tech in a vets office and 90% of the time I am VERY comfortable with the whole procedure. If a pet is truely suffering, look at it as the most unselfish last gift an owner can provide. The first few to witness are tough but after a while when you see just how painless and peaceful it is most of the time, it gets easier. I'm still sad along with the owners but I'm o.k. with it now. We use a product called Fatal Plus and it works FAST.
 

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That makes me feel a bit better, thanks... but... well, in this vet's office there are reptiles and other exotics, and I think that they don't have nearly as humane ways to put them down...
 

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I own chinchillas (as pets of course). Because they have tiny veins, they normally are euthanized with a needle to the heart (fatal plus injected into the heart). When I had to euthanize an old chinchila recently, I asked that he be sedated first with isoflourane (mask over the face) so that he didn't feel anything. Sometimes in very old, very sick cats they're veins are virtually non-existant so they are sedated first before being euthanized.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Yes Jill, look at your animals, play, hug them, they are such a picker-upper..I kept looking at Madam curled up like a caterpillar on my chair dreaming nice kitty things while we're talking about euthanasia and stuff..
Ianthe I loved your fun experiences!! I printed your post for my mother in-law, she trust vets but keeps saying what a sad job they have.
Tell us more some other time :D
 

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When my gerbil was euthanized, they put her in a little tupperware container with a sterile pad soaked in anaesthetic. She went really fast. I think that is the most humane way to do it. (A petstore in town used to just throw them in the freezer to die :evil: )

Off-topic again, sorry :roll: , but does anyone know if lethal injection to the heart is painful? I thought I read that somewhere. That is how they euthanize cats at the shelter I work at.
 
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