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Discussion Starter #1
I have decided to take lymekaps advice (in the sugar gliders thread) and continue my convosation in a new thead, id also like to appologise to Roze for barging in and being negative.

Debo wrote:

And I suppose most people might react that very same way when they see all the pets you have in Captivity! People that live in glass houses really shouldn't throw stones Jimmy.
Jimmy's babys inc.. 2 Cats, 2 Dogs, 16 Budgies, 3 Quails, 2 Cockatiels, 2 Rats and 1 Guinea bub
Well you see all these animals have been selectively bred over hundreds of years and become fully domesticated. Exotic animals on the other hand such as Sugar gliders etc. have not, and the only reason they are pets today is because of illegal smugglers, which is one of the reasons many animals in the wild are becoming endangered today. (ForJazz stated that people have issues with people having quails as pets, so i will be looking into that)


The keeping of wild and exotic "pets" is on the rise around the world and especially in the United States. For example:


The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) estimates that, in 2000 alone, 9 million reptiles were kept as pets. Both HSUS and the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) estimate that more than 90% of them die in the first year.


Other experts estimate there are more captive tigers in the U.S. than those living wild in Asia.


Estimates of wolves and wolf-dogs, or hybrids, kept as pets range from 200,000–300,000.

With larger wild animals being kept as pets it theathens the lives of the owners aswell as the animal. Like for instance, on the news recently a 3yearold got mauled to death by the family dog which was part dingo.

For wild or exotic animals are by nature wild and do not respond well to captivity. As adults, many become destructive and physically dangerous while others carry diseases such as Herpes B or salmonella, potentially lethal to humans. Further, wild animals do not make good pets. They rarely do tricks, they ignore their owners, and they are difficult and expensive to care for. Whether wild-caught or captive bred, even the exotic animals seen in pet shops are wild by nature and have not been domesticated. The urge to buy them should be resisted, for the outcome is almost always tragic.

Wildlife Trade: The Big Picture

In the United States, the growing number of displaced animals results from an exotic animal market fueled by legal and illegal importers, trappers, breeders, dealers, zoos, pet stores, and the public itself. Zoos, circuses, and other animal acts respond to the public's demand to see baby animals by breeding. The result is a surplus of animals who have no place to go. They end up being sold to roadside zoos, or becoming exotic meat, food for other carnivores, or trophies in canned hunts.

Breeders and pet stores also play on the demand for baby animals, selling them as "pets." But when the novelty of having a wild or exotic pet fades or the animal's adolescent or adult demands become unmanageable, these creatures are relegated to cages in backyards, garages, basements, or worse. Some are resold, thus reentering the animal market, what has been aptly called the surplus animals' "cycle of ****." Only a few arrive at sanctuaries. Other unwanted pets are abandoned or killed. Their lives neither take place nor end in their natural home, the one place where those lives and those deaths belong.

I would realy like to hear your views on this.
 

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I'm not a big fan of exotic pets either. Although they are darn cute!

I had a professor in college that had a "pet" great horned owl. He got the bird from a little chick, so it imprinted on him. His purpose for getting it was educational. He takes it to local grade schools to teach the kids about the different birds of prey. He doesn't keep it as a pet like we think of pets, but it's not wild either, which is sad.

Some exotics are just strange to me. Apparently in some states, they sell prairie dogs as pets????? Those things are problem rodents around here! Not to mention that disease that hit one of the states that was adopting them out, WI I think?

I think some owners can make excellent owners for their exotics. The ones who take time to research what they need. I don't have as big of a problem with ones bred in captivity. It's still sad to me especially if it really is a "wild" animal and hasn't been domesticated for many many generations. So in that sense, your quail would qualify as an exotic.
 

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It depends on the animal, the situation, and the owner.

My aunt and uncle, who live in Mississippi, have a "pet" racoon, Katie. They aquired her because their neighbors shot her mother because she got into their trash cans. Her sister died by the time they were found, and my aunt and uncle (who are LICENSED wildlife rehabilitators) took Katie in and bottle fed her. At first, they were hoping to be able to remain distant enough so they could release her when she was grown, but it is pretty difficult to bottle feed a baby raccoon every 2 hours for several weeks without her getting to know you and be somewhat tame. :wink: As she grew, she got a bit more wild (she is a wild animal after all) and learned, with help, how to catch SOME food by herself, like crabs, out of the bayou by their house. After she graduated from her bottle feeding stage, the built her a big pen out side where she lived for several months, and little by little they allowed her freedom out in the backyard/surrounding areas, for longer and longer periods of time, and she would only go to the edge of the yard and then come running back. Eventually, they left the pen open all the time. Katie now really, could take off she wanted to, because her pen is always open, but she never will. SHe goes out and climbs trees and explores, but always comes back at night to sleep and eat (they have to supplement her diet because she doesn't catch enough food on her own...she ADORES fruit loops as a treat) , and she also comes when you call her! :lol:

As a side note, they had to leave her during Katrina and were very worried about her being able to find shelter and survive.....but 2 days after they returned to their house, she came back, scared, hungry, but alive. :D
 

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Ianthe said:
It depends on the animal, the situation, and the owner.

My aunt and uncle, who live in Mississippi, have a "pet" racoon, Katie. They aquired her because their neighbors shot her mother because she got into their trash cans. Her sister died by the time they were found, and my aunt and uncle (who are LICENSED wildlife rehabilitators) took Katie in and bottle fed her. At first, they were hoping to be able to remain distant enough so they could release her when she was grown, but it is pretty difficult to bottle feed a baby raccoon every 2 hours for several weeks without her getting to know you and be somewhat tame. :wink: As she grew, she got a bit more wild (she is a wild animal after all) and learned, with help, how to catch SOME food by herself, like crabs, out of the bayou by their house. After she graduated from her bottle feeding stage, the built her a big pen out side where she lived for several months, and little by little they allowed her freedom out in the backyard/surrounding areas, for longer and longer periods of time, and she would only go to the edge of the yard and then come running back. Eventually, they left the pen open all the time. Katie now really, could take off she wanted to, because her pen is always open, but she never will. SHe goes out and climbs trees and explores, but always comes back at night to sleep and eat (they have to supplement her diet because she doesn't catch enough food on her own...she ADORES fruit loops as a treat) , and she also comes when you call her! :lol:

As a side note, they had to leave her during Katrina and were very worried about her being able to find shelter and survive.....but 2 days after they returned to their house, she came back, scared, hungry, but alive. :D
When I was a little girl in WI, my parents took us to a B&B that had 4 "pet" otters. Same situation, they were orphaned and had to be hand reared by people. There was no way they could survive in the wild. The people who had them were also rehabilitators. The otters were not really tame, but they did live in an enclosure that had a big pond for them and they were fed daily.

ETA: I don't really think (at least with me) that this is what people think about when thinking about exotic pets.
 

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jennifer2 said:
Some exotics are just strange to me. Apparently in some states, they sell prairie dogs as pets????? Those things are problem rodents around here! Not to mention that disease that hit one of the states that was adopting them out, WI I think?
One of my friends actually has two prarie dogs... sweet little things :) But I joke that they became such a problem out west they started "exporting them" as pets instead of killing them. Don't know if that's really how it happened though ;)
 

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Actually, I believe that is true! Someone is making a MINT shipping the little rodents to the midwest!

Actually, your friend should hope that theirs did not come from the southwest, at least not NM. Ours have Plague!
 

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My dad had a pet full grown Lynx, I had a hand hatched and reared Starling and my uncle had a pet crow....I honestly think it depends on how endangered the species is and/or how it was raised...
 

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If I see an orphaned baby animal on the side of the road, I would raise it as it were my own. I can't help it.

However, I would never purchase an exotic animal...although I do have a tank of tropical fish....I do believe that tiger barbs readily reproduce in nature, though...and it is not part of endangered animals.

I looked into having a saltwater aquarium once, and I believed the saltwater aquatic industry is endangering a lot of exotic species, so it is something to think about.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yea i myself have raised many wild birds that i have saved, itz just the trade that is the problem. I mean with exotic animals you just dont know if they've been taken straight out of the wild or not, at pet stores they sell galahs and lorakeets (which i have seen very small flocks of around the area in the past) and it just makes you wonder because apparently its a big issue at the moment with people nest robbing, taking eggs from the nests of wild animals and either illegally exports them to other countrys or selling tham as hand reared birds.
 

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shengmei said:
If I see an orphaned baby animal on the side of the road, I would raise it as it were my own. I can't help it.
Me too.

shengmei said:
However, I would never purchase an exotic animal...although I do have a tank of tropical fish....I do believe that tiger barbs readily reproduce in nature, though...and it is not part of endangered animals.
I wouldn't purchase one either, it just seems so risky to the animal. Survival rates aren't good and I'm sure they feel scared and upset about being taken from their natural environments. Tiger barbs are definitely not endangered and actually do pretty well in captivivty.

shengmei said:
I looked into having a saltwater aquarium once, and I believed the saltwater aquatic industry is endangering a lot of exotic species, so it is something to think about.
I've had saltwater aquariums in addition to freshwater. Saltwater isn't hard to maintain as long as you have the time and $$. You have to be diligent with water quality as the slightest changes can kill your entire habitat. My very basic saltwater setup with no live rock or corals was ~$1000 (US). My tank was only 45 gallons and I had live sand, filter, protein skimmer, heater and a powerhead. The fish are very expensive too and you have to be careful where you get them because some companies harvest protected reefs and use poison to stun the animals to catch them and ship them.
 

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Reputable fish stores will not purchase any stock from the wild. And the owners will tell you upon asking (usually) if the fish were harvested wild or bred.

The corals that I have in my nano-reef were all from other reefers whose collection grew too big for their systems and shared with other reefers, or sold to petstores to resell.

But, again, any saltwater system requires a lot of knowledge and work, so if you're not willing to take care of it, you'll probably end up with a rotten-egg smelling tank in a few weeks or few months.
 
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