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We went through this with our cat Newt about 7 months ago. Before we knew what it was we had seen 3 vets and spent around $1000.00 on drugs and therapy...none of it helped.

For the last month, he wasn't too bad up until the end. We had to force feed and force water (via syringe) to keep him eating and hydrated but he still lost weight. The final days are hard because they tend to go one of two ways:


FIP (wet): This form causes fluid to build up in the abdomen. If the water is not released regulary, the cat will drown.

FIP (dry): This is the form we dealt with. It is undetectable unless an autopsy is performed. Lesions form on the organs (mainly the liver) effecting just about all functions. The cat usually tend to have balance and other neural problems as the disease progresses.

We're pretty sure our cat had it his whole life (1 year). He was never a big eater and threw up quite often. Once he began having balancing problems and could no longer walk...we had him put down. :(
 

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Re: FIP

drjean said:
Sorry to hear about your kitty! It's so sad to lose a young cat; it just isn't fair!

FIP does usually strike cats less than 2 years of age, but there is a second peak in cats over 10. So, while 11 is a little unusual, it is in the second expected period. My oldest FIP patient was a pretty 13-year old calico, and her tummy "blew up" overnight with fluid. It was a real shock.

FIP is a very hard disease to deal with. Its very name is erroneous. It is feline, but it is not particularly infectious, and it isn't always peritonitis. There is a vaccine for it, but the vaccine is ineffective, and some studies showed that vaccinated cats who developed FIP actually got sicker and died faster. None of the experts recommend this vaccine, and to my knowledge, very few vets give it. If yours is one, Just Say No!

FIP is really an autoimmune disease. The lesions and fluid that develop are due to the immune response to an otherwise harmless virus.

Nearly all cats are exposed to the corona virus as kittens. Conventional science speculates that the virus is eliminated by the immune system, or remains dormant in the vast majority of cats. In the few that develop FIP, they think the virus somehow mutates to a more virulent form. I don't buy that, myself, but I'm a bit radical on this one! IMHO the cause could also be the cat's immune system being altered in some way, either it's genetically abnormal, or something (unknown) happens to cause it to go haywire. Saying the coronavirus causes FIP is a little like saying "Flies cause garbage" just because the two are usually found together.

Cheers,
Dr. Jean
Jean,

In my research, I found that FIP like the corona virus is shed through the feces and can live outside the body anywhere from 2 weeks to 9 weeks. Is this true?
 

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catwalk said:
Thanks for the support guys. We had to lay Mieko down today. It was sad but he was in peace finally. Our vet said he was probably born with fip through the mother. His stomach was always a bit on the big side. He was very active for his first 5 months. He slowed down, and really got bad a week ago. The results of his test were very overwelming in that
1:1024 his results
1:32-1:64 would be negative
1:128 positive
The disease can be contacted can hit older cat, though usually only to two yrs old. There is nothing we can do to prevent it, in that some cats are born with it.
Sorry for your loss. This disease is awful not only because the cat doesn't know what is happening but also because, as the owner, you're pretty much helpless. I scoured the net for a cure and only found a case of one cat that had put the disease in remission. What drjean says is 100% accurate, cats under 2 years and over 10 years are usually the effected due to under developed or weak immune systems.
 
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