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Hi all.

Recently I spotted a youngish (<6 mo estimated) kitten that lives/hangs out somewhere between an interstate highway and the access road, on a long patch of grass. I'm guessing she lives somewhere in the drainage pipes.

I've already booked an appointment to get her speutered and get rabies with the Humane Society.

My question being, she lives in a wildly dangerous area. How bad is it to relocate her? She knows how to avoid traffic, I thought maybe she would come to me one time and stupidly tried to catch her (Realized my mistake rather quickly). She's obviously survived this long, but should I relocate her or let her go back to where she lives now? :(

Also, what happens if I trap her and shes not feral and just stray? Will I see a difference?

I'm reading up on how to trap them now, etc. I should start feeding her regularly now, right? With a pungent food like tuna or wet food. The only thing I get afraid of is that ants will eat it, or something. Plus, it's close to my work and not my house. :(
 

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It will take several days to see a difference. Do you have the ability to get her spayed and keep her safe for several days while she settles down?? At our shelter we give ferals about 3-5 days to settle down before determining if they are stray-shy or truly feral.

I can't help with the relocating part, but she clearly does not need to be living there. No good could come of that. Even street wise raccoons and possums end up as road kill here with our access roads and highways all over the place. If food becomes scarce she may venture out further and further - a disaster.
 

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It's better to trap her, just put the food in the trap 2-3 days before her appointment in case you don't get lucky the first try. if you start to feed her now, when the time comes to trap her and you put the food in the trap, she will not go in. She has survived this long, it's better this way. Feral cats will hiss, but whether she's feral or stray, it's best to have her fixed and relocate her. they will adjust. Even though you made an appointment, and if you're lucky to trap her a few days before the apptmt you can just call in and say that you got lucky and was able to trap a feral and see if they can squeeze you in for the neutering/spaying. I did this many times and the humane society was able to squeeze me in.
 
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