Cat Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,572 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have about 20 cats that I feed every day, sometimes twice a day. Most are already TNR'ed, the rest are in the process of being trapped.

They each live in their own territory, none further than 1.5 blocks from the feeding station, which is downstairs from my apt. I leave water out for them permanently and change it every night when I feed them. I feed them kibble, a better kind than the one for street cats. About once a week or 2 weeks I give them raw chicken instead of kibble. Once in a blue moon I give them canned tuna or whole yoghurt.

I spend at least an hour or two a day with them, often more. I talk to them, try to gain their trust, pet the ones that allow me to and the ones that prefer to rub on me can do so freely, for a long time. I've made beds for 2 of them who live in the feeding station itself.

A few of them follow me on my walks with Prince to the park.

None of them are ferals, of course, because none of them are afraid of me. They won't run off if they see me coming, even though most don't let me touch them yet. Then again, they each have their permanent territories where they sleep and don't roam for food, so they don't wander. That would mean they're not strays. But since most of them live in the buildings parking lots and gardens, and spend time in the feeding station, which is a public garden owned by the municipality, then they're not yard cats either.

I'd like to know if there's a category for this kind of cat...?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,125 Posts
In the US they are considered feral. Even though you can pet some of them. One of the first cats I TNRed had been circling my sisters neighborhood for over a year. We put out food for him. He wouldnt let us near him but came each day to be fed.

After I TNRed him he stuck around and would lay outside the screen porch with the cats inside the screened porch laying by him! He started to want to come in for a few minutes. then it went longer and longer. We started to push his boundaries and touch him, then pick him up briefly, etc. It took 4 years and he now is in the house 95% of the time and I can pick him up, carry him around, medicate him. We know he was once someones cat or we wouldnt be able to do this. We call him our Faux Feral.

Domestic cats which are abandoned turn feral to survive. If they dont they wont last long. So I consider those feral cats.

A true feral which never has been touched by human hands would take your face off if you werent careful. But to me both types of cats are ferals.

I have to say you are wonderful for all the compassionate work and devotion you show these kitties. Youve given them a quality of life most abandoned cats will never have. They starve, get sick & die horrible deaths with out our help. Thank you for making such a huge difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,572 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you, Mitts. Actually, I don't feel as good about it anymore, ever since you posted that video and someone told me that indeed, in the south of the city there are much needier cats. Some of the people in my neighborhood take the bus to the south with carriages to feed those cats. I'm a lazy one... But I like to think that I give the cats here something that few others give: food for the soul. And in that regard, they are as starved here in the north as those in the south.

So you don't have a category for "strays" or "yard" cats?

Maybe this thread should be moved to the Feral Cats forum, then?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,125 Posts
I bumped into a volunteer of our TNR group at her job yesterday. She said she could no longer foster and felt guilty. She now does our face page and newsletters. I told her I couldnt put together a newsletter or spell correctly (as everyone knows on CF!) But I can crawl under a shed and get kittens out and foster 16 at a time at my home. We all do what we can do and we all are making a difference in the cats lives. That is the bottom line.

Im still working so what I can do is limited. My retired friends can be available so much more. But all of us together making an effort makes up the big picture. Each person effort is important

What you are doing is tremendously important. I was in awe reading your devotion to this colony. Touched my heart. Dont ever think your efforts are as important because of what someone else is able to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,513 Posts
I applaud both of you for helping them out. As Mitts said, every little bit counts and we all do what we can for them within our means. I feel bad sometimes that I cannot do more. However I realized now after I rescued Miu (surrendered to the shelter when she was two months) and Jack (who I trapped from outside) that this is the most I can handle given my own life circumstances. If I take in any more, I would be compromising the amount of attention and care I can give to the both of them. That would be unfair to them.

I finally decided there's always more than one way to do things so now I donate to a no kill cat rescue and share/increase my knowledge on cats, dogs and chinchillas. I also strive to raise awareness of animal issues when I get a chance. I may not be helping directly, but I believe awareness is the first and an important step in helping our animal friends.

Anyways, back on topic. Captain Jack was also in the same category. He wasn't a true feral or else he would have been way more aggressive. He's too much of a softy. Miu who grew up with me indoors is even more aggressive than he is and he is submissive to her. He was a stray and probably if I hadn't caught him, he would have slowly turned feral. He would show up at my house even though I wasn't feeding him at the time. I think he was lonely. He'd spend hours sitting there staring at Rocky the dog or Miu. Eventually, I started to feed him and he hung around even more. He showed up at odd hours too so I think he wasn't someone's outdoor cat. He even started to sleep in a box I had outside.

He wouldn't let me touch him when he was outside. He only started to allow touching after about a month indoors and picking up after about 2-3 months that. After half a year, he still won't allow nail clipping, but will allow me to stroke his paws without shrinking them back.

Although I would never know, I think he was someone's cat who either ran off or was abandoned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,572 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Alpaca, what you do and the fact that you adopted two cats is invaluable in my opinion. I'd love to have 2 cats, but my budget doesn't allow it. Here the quality kibble and the litter are imported, so they cost about 2-3 times what they cost in the US.

Tonight, (On Friday evenings, i.e. Shabat, the streets are very quiet, almost no cars or people, just the cats and me) I gave my strays an All-You-Can-Eat-Chicken-Buffet. I love it when they immediately disappear after eating - because it means they felt they had a wonderful meal so they're eager to go groom and sleep (after dusk), they don't linger hoping for more food or better food. Because it was an all-you-can-eat, there was a lovely calm atmosphere, no fights between them, and even the most shy got to eat as much as they wanted. Some people pass by and pity me, thinking that's all I have to do on a weekend night. I pity them, as they don't know the immense satisfaction it is to see over 20 happy faces where there were scared, tense, lonely faces before.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,513 Posts
That is so wonderful that you do that for them. Actually, now that I think about it. That's what happened to Jack. As a stray, he was so used to constantly being cautious that he was always alert to possible danger. When I got him, he was so frightened, he never played or let down his guard because he was so tense and stressed. I saw the improvement and transition from scared and tense to trusting and relaxed. It's very truly remarkable and as you say, one just has to go through it to actually appreciate the experience. It's almost indescribable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,572 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
At least here, what cats fear the most is other cats. It's not true, however, that cats prefer to be alone. Cats, at least in my colony, love the company of other cats - if those other cats aren't being territorial. Cats are less territorial the more and the better food there is. So on a night like this, the cats not only enjoy the food, but like in a human party, they come away with a positive experience of being together in harmony. The more I know cats, the more I realize there's no big difference between their needs and ours.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top