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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

Just taken Lynx for his first trip to vet and I've come back confused and annoyed...

He had his first set of vaccinations and was de wormed.. Not sure wether that was necessary he asked had he been wormed I said yes as I bought a store bought one and then he went and did it anyway... But forget that... As long as he is clear of worms I don't care...

He told me you should be feeding your cat dry food... Because the wet will rot his teeth.. He said there are lot s of rumours about kidney problems but they are un true...

He said well the wets are 85 percent water so they aren't getting much goodness anyway.. I said my kitten doesn't drink water. He hasn't touched water other than the time he had an upset stomach. He said please don't tell me you feed him just milk? I said no I don't feed him any milk?! Most cats are lactose intolerant aren't they? My cat doesn't drink water and I was under the impression that he got most of his water from
His food which will be a lot more than he would from dry..

This vet I will add is based inside a large pet store. They don't sell any food there. He said whatever you buy in that store...doesn't affect this vet if that's what you might think...

He's got to go back in 3 weeks... To have his second lot of jabs and probably another worming at a fiver a go I can't afford this every 3 weeks I just called the vet and they told me they were given pro fender spot on.... Also while I'm here I haven't noticed fleas or Anything.. I bought a flea collar to put on at 12 weeks but have read bad things what would people suggest? I feel everything I'm doing is wrong?! Xxx sorry for long post...


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Congrats on the new kitty :) how old is he / where did you get him from?

And dont worry that you are doing things wrong. Many pet owners don't even question their vet, so you are already on the right track!

For vaccinations, I would recommend doing some research on over vaccinating cats. IMO, I think they are receiving too many unnecessary shots at such a young age. Catinfo.org has a very interesting section on vaccinations.

For the food, your vet is simply wrong, and I think it is just due to a lack of personal research on his part. Most vets don't get any nutritional courses in school, and if they do, they are almost always sponsored by a pet food company such as Iams or Science Diet. There are no studies showing that wet 'rots' cats teeth. Dry food can actually be worse for their teeth, since cats do not have an ability to chew (their jaws move only up and down) so there is really no teeth cleaning action going on. They also tend to be very high in carbohydrates (aka sugars) which promote plaque growth.

For food, I would recommend keeping him on a high protein, grain free wet food and supplementing with a bit of raw meat for keeping his teeth clean. Or, if you want to make the jump, I would really go with a raw-prey model diet. But, if you are just concerned about his teeth, giving him a hunk of raw meat that he has to gnaw off bite size pieces is fantastic.

Sorry I'm not familiar with flee protection. Is he going to be an outdoor kitty? Or does he have flees now? I'm confused why you even need it, but I agree, I have heard bad things about the collars. Hopefully someone else can chime in about that.


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Don't use the flea collar, they are not safe for cats or kittens. Profender only needs to be put on a cat ONCE, if the cat is an inside cat.

If your kitten has fleas, he will need to be on a flea treatment such as frontline plus for at least six months. (Because flea eggs in the house will continue to hatch for that long)

The vet is absolutely wrong about dry food. Unfortunately many vets have not botherred to educate themselves about our obligate carnivores and feline nutrtion.

Keep your kitten on a canned diet. It is so so so much better for him. Canned food does not "rot teeth".

Here is a website to help explain to you why canned food is so much better.

Feeding Your Cat: Know the Basics of Feline Nutrition :: healthy cat diet, making cat food, litter box, cat food, cat nutrition, cat urinary tract health

Perhaps you can find another vet. If not, just ignore the vet when he rants about dry food and know that YOU know better.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I had booked up in a couple of weeks time to go to my local vets but my cousin saw an offer that ran out today about half price jabs and £10 microchipping so I went for it... Lynx is registered in 2 vets although I haven't actually tried the second one yet... No he doesn't have fleas... I have no other pets and I'm planning on him being an indoor cat (maybe the occasional walk in the garden) unless he has other ideas... I'm just trying to be a responsible owner and prevent any fleas ticks worms parasites... I'm Paranoid because I read that eggs can live in your carpet for years and wait for a host.. And I know that the old residence had a lot of pets...

I'm new so don't know how to quote people but someone said about only needing one dose of the worming shot? I need to know how to avoid another one in a few weeks if that's the case? I'm going to be asking lots of questions so please be patient.. And another thing I am struggling with the I gredients on food? What am I looking for? I won't embarrass myself by saying what I'm feeding my kitten but ideally I want a low/grain free wet food cost is an issue and I'm scared about make your own?

Thanks guys.. And yeah this vet I wish I'd have really said what's on my mind!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
No no fecal? I'm assuming that means examining the poo? He just basically asked if he'd been wormed I said yes and he just did it!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
And I got the kitty from a friend on fb on a whim I don't know much about the background other than he was on adult dry food when I got him :/
 

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Most kittens do need to be de-wormed. Especially kittens acquired from who knows where (that is not a criticism :)).

Store bought de-wormers don't usually work, so the profender spot-on is good. Profender is not a shot, it is a liquid that goes on the back of the neck, just like flea treatments do.

Profender needs to be used only once for an indoor cat, because it works for a full month. It kills existing adult worms, and continues to kill them as the eggs already laid hatch and become adult worms. So if the cat does not go out and eat rodents, or have fleas, a repeat dose is not necessary.

Any canned food is better than dry. Don't feel "bad" about what you are feeding. If it is canned, it is better than dry. You are here to learn, and we are here to help, not judge.

If you tell the forum what you have available, it will help people guide you in making good food choices.

Write down your questions, and what you want done, when you take him back to the vet. If you go to the same vet, be up front and firm. NO MORE de-wormer. You have the right to refuse any treatment the vet tries to push on you.

Your indoor cat does not need, for instance, the feline leukemia vaccine, unless you have other cats who go outside. You don't have rabies over there. I think the distemper (FVRCP) vaccine is important. The kitten series, then one booster at one year. That is all.

The vet cannot force you to feed your cat kibble. If he brings up food again just refuse to discuss it. Either say nothing, or say "My cat is canned fed because he is an obligate carnivore and needs to get his moisture from his food. I don't want to discuss it further".
 

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Delders, I agree, no need to de-worm again. Unless you want to make the vet rich. And I agree 1,000 times that wet food is better than dry food. There is a saying, "take what you need and leave the rest". I notice you're in the U.K.
 

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why would he even ask if he had been dewormed if he was going to do it again anyway?

that's what I would ask him. good for you for questioning him, you are right! and i would definately look around for a new vet..
 

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Again agreeing with everyone that the poorest wet is better than the best dry. The following link is a breakdown of the nutritional content in commercial canned food:

http://binkyspage.tripod.com/canfood.html

The goal here is to look for a canned food with around 80% protein, and less than 10% carbs. Don't worry too much about fat content, since it doesn't affect cats like it affects us. The only issue would be to slowly transition over to the richer food, or he might get some tummy troubles.

Ingredients to definitely avoid are any unnamed meat products, ex : meat by-product meal. This means that the meat can come from pretty much anything (roadkill, zoo animals, euthanized companion animals, ect). Also, by-products are the bits and pieces left after processing that no-one else wants. It's best to go with a name meat and named meat meal. Meal is ground animal, which is necessary for their calcium intake.

Also, avoid grains such as corn and wheat. Corn has zero nutritional value for cats and is just filler, and as for any wheat product, many cats are allergic to wheat and gluten.

So, following those guidelines, it pretty much comes down to buying the best quality that you can afford.


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Discussion Starter #11
Thankyou.. When I bought him I straightway put him on wet (gradually over first week) because it does to me seem more natural and secondly because I cannot bear to hear a cat eat dry!!! I'm happy to order online... He's currently on Felix kitten pouches (please be nice) they were selling them for £4.15 per box of 12 or 2 for £5.00 I have roughly 3 boxes left and then will try to find the most healthiest food in terms of his teeth my kitten lets me clip his nails ( I've done it twice I googled how to do it properly) so I'm up for brushing his teeth if need be!! As I said in a previous post I hated cats until 2 weeks ago and now I'm spending 90 percent of my 'me'time doing cat related research! Lol x
 

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Discussion Starter #13
He is my third child!!! Xxx his new hooded litter tray has just arrived so very excited! (am I a freak for ordering it in colours that match my room? Lol )
 

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I thouight this was an interesting read.... im aware that science plan are a leading vet stocked kibble food... what I wasn't aware was that they were OWNED







Message: Royal Canin Foods' website suggests stocking its food in veterinary practices can 'increase practice turnover'
The pet-food manufacturers appear to be promoting their brands with the help of veterinary practices, sponsoring food displays in surgeries which help to generate business for vets (via commission and the fact that some specialist food can only be bought at veterinary surgeries).
Hills Science Plan, a pet-food brand owned by Colgate-Palmolive, boasts that: 'More vets feed Hills than any other pet food.' Last year, Hills sponsored the British Veterinary Association's 2009 Congress (the biggest meeting on the veterinary calendar).
It also signed a partnership with the British Veterinary Dental Association to sponsor tooth care in animals.
Royal Canin Foods (owned by Mars/Masterfoods) boasts on its website of 'its partnerships with leading veterinary schools and universities'.
It runs Pet Health Counsellor Courses, training veterinary nurses in diet, and says stocking its food in veterinary practices can 'increase practice turnover'.

Read more: Is the food you're feeding your pet killing it? (and making your vet rich) | Mail Online
 

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sorry pressed to quick... that they are owned.... by colgate... a toothpaste company... this is backing vets up with their dry food being better for the teeth theory... sorry if this is old news im shocked!!!
 

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I would start looking for another vet. I just switched my animals, I finally found one that I really like. They recommend wet food for cats and when I was in last they also said since my cat was over a year old they didn't need to do any more vaccinations. Besides that it sounds like the vet was talking down to you, I don't like that.

As far as the flea preventative and wormer, it depends on your situation. I use flea prev because I have dogs that go in and out and because I have fosters, but I don't worm my animals unless I have reason to suspect worms. I would worm a newbie or a kitten though if I wasn't sure of its background.

If you are worried that fleas may have been in your home before you got there, you could use flea stuff for a few months until you're sure, but I wouldn't use a flea collar, just the spot treatment.

Congrats on your kitten, enjoy him. :)
 

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New to cat ownership

I'm so glad you've discovered the joys of owning a kitty! I like dogs too, don't get me wrong... but they're completely different and so bring different joys to your life. :) My 3 cats are indoor only and my dog unfortunately passed in April, so I don't do anything to prevent fleas, or ticks for that matter. I've been feeding my kitten grain-free Blue Wilderness, but it's pricey as it only comes in tiny 3 oz cans (and I just got a nutritional ME analysis from the company, and supposedly it has 24.46% of the energy from carbs, which is terrible!), so I'm switching to Wellness CORE Kitten, which at least comes in 5.5 oz cans and the 36.3% Calories from protein, 58.0% Calories from fat, and only 5.7% Calories from carbohydrate. Mind you, the guaranteed analysis on the back of cans is not very helpful, so I e-mailed the companies as suggested by the article someone already posted a link to for you. Apparently the higher the protein % the better, and the carb % should be less than 10%. You also want to make sure it contains taurine, which is an essential amino acid for cats.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I think I'll have his jabs done and refuse the wormer... There is no reason for any fleas or worms to enter my house unless they jump from the floor below? Or they come on people's clothes...I've done as much research as I can on food and am just deciding that I can't afford the more expensive foods... But I will pay more for wet rather than dry...And out of my options I will find the highest protein, actual meat, and lowest carb... I found a website that actually worked out the carbs in cat food... Regarding his teeth I'll brush them and there's nothing wrong with getting the odd bit of raw meat to help... He currently doesn't have his collar o
 

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It's wonderful to see how much love you obviously have for Lynx ;}

It sounds like you're doing all the right things so far. Get him used to claw-clippings while he's young, and riding/being carried in the cat carrier, and being brushed/combed. Basically expose him to as many things as you can while he's a kitten so he won't be freaked out by them as an adult!

Many people say that cats never need baths, but you might want to see if you can get him used to a mild bathing while he's a kitten. Even full-indoors cats can sometimes get into very sticky things in the kitchen that you might not want them licking off their fur. (My cat is indoors-outdoors and I bathe her every two weeks.)

And even if he's going to be an indoors kitty, definitely keep a collar and ID on him at all times (once you get the breakaway/safety collar).

Cats don't usually drink a lot of water on their own unless something is wrong. You should always have a water bowl available, of course, but canned food is going to be Lynx's main source of moisture. (I have to mix extra water into my cat's canned food because she has kidney issues.)

And yeah, even "cheaper" canned food is miles better than dry kibble. Go with grain-free if you can; if you can't, don't worry too much about it. Canned food is still a good option.

As for flea prevention, as long as Lynx won't be going outside or encountering other animals, you should be okay. You can try to look for a monthly flea treatment, but if it's out of your budget, skip the flea collars (they can be dangerous or even poisonous) and just be vigilant. Comb him often and check the comb for "flea bits" - little black or brown flecks that can indicate the presence of fleas.

It sounds like you're doing a lot of research for your kitty :} Good work! Keep us updated on how he's doing ;}
 
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