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Hello friends,
I have an Exotic Flat face with breathing problems, 1.5 years of age . I have taking him to my regular vet may times and they give him antibiotics which don't relieve the problem., after 4 vistis and almost $1000.00 the vet has the nerve to say to me I am only a general vet this isn't my specialty. I have taken him twice time to the animal hospital when he was open mouth breathing, they never suggested surgery. I love my persians and I will do anything for their health but I can't spend thousands of $$ and the poor thing still has a stuffy nose. Has anyone had this experience and know where I can take him? I believe he needs surgery but I want to make sure I will be putting him in good hands for treatment I live in Rhode Island and will travel to a vet out of state.
Best
Michelle
 

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Many people don't have those kinds of cats because of their known health issues and medical costs. Contact a vet school near you, sometimes as a teaching tool they will charge less or recommend a good specialty vet.

Brachycephalic syndrome, or respiratory distress syndrome, is a disease that affects brachycephalic cats – those with a short nose and flat face—such as your Exotic Shorthair. Although these cats have the same amount of tissue in their noses and throats as other breeds of cats, the flattened features provide less space for the tissue to grow. Consequently, the soft palate, the soft area in the back of the roof of the mouth, grows too long for the mouth and hangs down into the airway. The nostrils are also often too small, and sometimes the trachea, or windpipe, is narrow and undersized. All of these elements contribute to a narrow and obstructed airway in cats with brachycephalic syndrome. Many affected cats can barely breathe normally; many have sleep apnea and snore, have chronic respiratory infections, and develop swelling and congestion in their throats, which only worsens the problem. Brachycephalic syndrome cats are also more prone to heat stroke and have a higher risk for anesthetic complications. Many cats with this syndrome die at an early age, but correcting the defects through surgery as soon as possible, ideally at the time of spaying or neutering, can help your pet live a long and normal life. With surgery, the long soft palate can be shortened, the nostrils can be snipped open, and more regular breathing can be restored. Some brachycephalic syndrome cats are not severely affected early on, but may develop more serious problems as they get older, in which case surgery can be done at that time.
 

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I have a nearly 2 year old persian with the same problem, it is because they're so interbred. My vet gave me antibiotics which cleared his nose right up and he was like a completely different cat but eventually his nasal problems continued
 
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