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A co worker gave me 4 lovely fresh caught Steelhead Trout this morning. He just caught them yesterday.....

I can't eat them, the purine level in them would be the equivalent of eating THREE steaks (hello gout!).

If I make sure there are no bones in them, do you think the cats could eat them in small amounts (either raw or cooked)?

They are wild caught and just beautiful. I hate to give them away/waste them if the boys can benefit from them.
 

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Go for it! Take the bones out if you're worried, but Jitzu likes to crunch the big bones in trout tails and spines. I filet the fish and take out the ribs, but leave the spine, head (cut in half), and tail for them to gnaw on.

My guys love fish, but the expect it to be de-scaled *eye roll*
 

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Isn't there something about raw fish destroying some vitamin?
 

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I just talked to the co worker and it's filleted and cleaned. NO head, no ribs, no spinem no head and no scales.

I'm bummed I can't eat it. It's BEAUTIFUL! fish. I almost choked when I looked at the purine chart, there is little else above trout. I could eat two lobsters for the amount in this fish.....

I'll cut it up into chunks for them and freeze it on a cookie sheet so I can yank out a few chunks for them once a week. I'll replace their Sardines with this until it's all gone.

Thanks Becky!
 

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I’m just so confused because I thought I heard on this very forum that you can’t give cats fish although I’ve been conditioned my whole life that cats eat fish from cartoons as a child to cat food commercials and movies as an adult.

So what’s the true story about fish & cats?
 

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Raw fish from the ocean is high in mercury. I think that's the concern you're talking about Doodlebug?

In any case, feeding raw fish as an occasional meal (mine get it less than once a month) isn't a bad thing. I usually buy trout rather than ocean fish anyways - since I'm trying to be more conscious about what we're eating and the effect on the environment and that puts most seafood right out - there's much less mercury in fresh water fish.
 

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You shouldn't give cats fish REGULARLY.

This is the difference between eating at McDonald's every night, or once a month. Every night = bad, once a month = not going to hurt.
 

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My guys get two little Sardines each on Sunday evenings. Lots of Omega and it's a nice treat for them. That's all the fish they get.

That's what I'll use this for, I'll chunk it into a comparable size and freeze it so they can get this and I won't have to buy sardines.

it's freshwater river trout.
 

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I’m just so confused because I thought I heard on this very forum that you can’t give cats fish although I’ve been conditioned my whole life that cats eat fish from cartoons as a child to cat food commercials and movies as an adult.

So what’s the true story about fish & cats?
http://www.littlebigcat.com/nutrition/why-fish-is-dangerous-for-cats/

* The fish used in canned pet foods usually includes bones, and is high in phosphorus and magnesium, which can be an issue in cats with a history of urinary tract disorders or kidney disease. In practice, I have seen quite many cats develop urinary tract infections and blockages if they eat much fish–even boneless fish like canned tuna.
* Many cats are sensitive or even allergic to fish; it is one of the top 3 most common feline food allergens.
* Fish-based foods contain high levels of histamine, a protein involved in allergic reactions.
* There is a known link between the feeding of fish-based canned cat foods and the development of hyperthyroidism in older cats.
* Predatory fish at the top of the food chain, such as tuna and salmon, may contain very elevated levels of heavy metals (including mercury) as well as PCBs, pesticides, and other toxins. Tilefish (listed on pet food labels as “ocean whitefish”) are among the worst contaminated, along with king mackerel, shark, and swordfish. These fish are so toxic that the FDA advises women of child-bearing age and children to avoid them entirely; and they recommend only 1 serving of albacore tuna per week due to its high mercury levels. If these fish are dangerous to children, cats are at even higher risk!
* A substance called domoic acid, a very stable, heat resistant toxin produced by certain species of algae that are becoming more common in coastal regions due to climate change. Domoic acid particularly accumulates in mussels, clams, scallops, and fish. Because it is so dangerous, the FDA limits the amount of this neurotoxin in seafood. However, new research indicates that domoic acid causes damage to the kidneys at concentrations 100 times less than the amount that causes brain toxicity. This is especially concerning for cat guardians, because not only can the legal level of domoic acid in any seafood harm the kidneys, but fish that are condemned for human consumption due to excessive domoic acid may instead be processed into pet food. Could contaminated fish in cat food be a hidden factor in the high rate of chronic kidney disease in older cats, who may have been eating this toxin every day for years?
* Fish and other seafood in the Pacific Ocean have been exposed to leaking radiation from the damaged Fukushima nuclear power facility in Japan for nearly three years. While the authorities continue to assert that there is (so far) no danger from eating Pacific seafood, the plant is still releasing 300 tons of highly toxic radioactive water into the ocean every day, with no end in sight. The first part of the initial radioactive plume has already reached U.S. shores; and low levels of Fukushima-specific radioisotopes have been found in West Coast seafood. While the Pacific Ocean’s vastness can and does greatly dilute the radioactive materials, the continuing leakage–as well as Japan’s recently-revealed dishonesty about its estimates of the amount of radiation involved–is cause for some concern. Arecent meta-analysis found reported significant negative effects on the immune system, and well as increased mutations and disease occurrence even at extremely low levels.
* Salmon is a popular cat food ingredient, but today nearly all of it comes from factory-farmed fish. These unfortunate animals are kept in overcrowded net pens– feedlots–in polluted coastal waters. They’re fed anti-fungals, antibiotics, and brightly-colored dyes to make their flesh “salmon colored”–it would otherwise be gray. Common water pollutants such as PCBs, pesticides, and other chemicals are present in farmed salmon at 10 times the amount found in wild fish. These contaminants will be present in any product made with farmed fish, including cat and dog food.
* “Organic” salmon is also farm-raised, and does not have to comply with USDA organic standards. In fact, there is currently no regulatory agency in the United States that sets organic standards for fish. The contaminant level of organic farmed salmon may be just as high as that of conventional farmed salmon.
* Even “wild-caught” Alaskan and Pacific salmon may have been born and raised in a hatchery.
* Farmed salmon transmit diseases and parasites; those who escape their pens (and they do) outcompete and interbreed with wild salmon.
* A 2006 study confirms that salmon farms are “massive breeding grounds” for sea lice. Under natural conditions, wild adult fish carrying these parasites are not in migration channels at the same time as the defenseless, inch-long baby salmon, so infestation of the young fish is not a problem. But today, in waters near fish farms (which tend to be located at the end of those same migration channels), up to 95% of baby salmon are fatally infested. It is feared that that farmed salmon from nearly 300 fish factories in North America may ultimately decimate the wild population in the Atlantic.
* New research (Dec. 2013) from the University of California raises concerns that the plastics floating in our oceans are absorbing chemical pollutants from the water. Toxins can move up the food chain, starting when fish eat small, contaminated pieces of plastic. Those contaminants enter their tissues, and are transferred to those who eat the fish: including bigger fish (e.g., tuna, mackerel, and tilefish–the fish most commonly referred to as “ocean whitefish”), as well as people and pets.
* Fish tends to be “addictive” to cats. They love it, and will often stage a “hunger strike” by refusing their regular food in favor of fish. Tuna or other fish should be reserved as a rare and special treat. Feed fish no more than once a week, and even then in very small amounts only.
* The meat is unhealthy, and the fishing/aquaculture industry is environmentally destructive–need we say more?
 

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Isn't there something about raw fish destroying some vitamin?
A cat consuming too much fish in their diet can lead to thiamine (B1) and vitamin E deficiencies. If fish is fed too frequently, the cat may not be interested in eating other types of protein, hence you'll be creating a "fish addict". The high levels of mercury or other chemical toxins found in large fish is another concern as librarychick already stated. Smaller fish like anchovies, sardines, or mackerel is preferred.

Librarychick and MowMow are feeding their cats on a prey model raw diet which limits fish intake to prevent that, so I think it'll be fine. Fish is used in prey model raw to supplement a cat's intake of Omega-3s. Ground raw diet, good quality canned, and dry foods already include fish or salmon oils.
 

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The other big difference is that Krissy is talking about trout which is a fresh water fish. Almost everything I've ever read on 'why fish is bad' references ONLY salt water fish, aka from the ocean. That isn't the case here. Fresh water fish is very different from salt water fish and won't have been exposed to the same levels of chemicals.

Autumnrose, that info is great - but again - since this is fresh water trout, doesn't really apply here because it's referencing salt water fish such as salmon, tuna, ect. Excepting the bit about fish being addictive, that still applies.
 

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Thanks for posting this. I wish I had known about the fish issue before going out and buying tuna and salmon flavored wet cat food. I figured that it would be a great way to get my cats to eat wet food.
 

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Catdaddy all is not lost!
You could use some of what you have mixed in with the canned, that would be better for them!
Also in case you have a cat that's not feeling well, it's not bad to have a backup of something that they find irresistible! ;)
 

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The tuna and salmon stuff I have is canned cat food which I'm very confused about now if I can or can't give Kramer and Buster tuna and salmon flavored wet cat food. The reason I asked about giving the cats actual canned tuna and salmon was trying to figure out something else to give them as a treat other than cat treats.
 

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Plenty of people give their cats fish wet food, there's a huge market for it. But it is not the best for the cat, far too many heavy metals, not good if you're worried about UTI, and you run the risk of getting a fish addict. I stay clear of it for those reasons... but once in a while, like once a month, Jasper gets a chicken/whitefish food.
 

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Catdaddy, It is my understanding, that you can feed canned fish cat food, just not every day...once a week or so is fine...
The reasons why you don't want to feed an entirely fish based diet are pretty clearly outlined in this thread.

I do give mine a Salmon Special diet rated one, once a week but it is mixed in with the others, that I am feeding them that day...
It keeps them from being bored, but its not enough to create a fish junkie!

Maybe someone else can chime in and add clarification, if needed...
 

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TThe FDA suggests that no more than 12 oz. of low-mercury fish should be eaten in one week. Fish with the lowest mercury include crab, catfish, flounder, haddock, lobster, salmon, shrimp and tilapia, among many others. Fish with the highest mercury should be avoided for pregnant women and include grouper, swordfish, tilefish and shark. Fish in between the highest and lowest levels of mercury should be moderated to three 6-oz. servings in a month. These fish include halibut, tuna, saltwater bass, croaker, blufish and sea trout.
And that's for a human. Pregnant women avoiding the heavier metal fish ("tilefish" is "whitefish") says enough for me -- if you don't want a fetus getting that level of mercury, then what about a cat?!
 

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Carmel,
At the rate I'm feeding my cats...one 5.5 ounce can salmon cat food, mixed in with a 13 ounce can of a chicken or turkey wet can food, for one day a week, one meal only, (as they also get canned at night)...
Do you see any problems with that for a special perk for them?
And it is spread out among ten cats!
Thanks!
 

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Yes, there's a problem... it sounds too time consuming to me. :lol: It should be fine, but it is something to be aware of that humans have stricter guildlines on fish than our small 6-15 pound cats do! A great deal of people feed nothing but fish.
 
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