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So in my research I found that we should be using killed virus, not live modified vaccines.

My vet seems to use a Live modified. I saw a brand called Felovax, which is a killed virus.

Can anyone educate me more on this? - Yes I've googled it.
 

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I've actually heard the opposite, and that live vaccines are much safer for cats.

The problem with killed vaccines is that since all the microbes and viruses in them are killed, they naturally don't stimulate a strong immune system response in the cat. Therefore, killed vaccines include something called an adjuvant--aluminum hydroxide or some other salt, whose only purpose is to create inflammation and irritation at the injection site in order to force an immune response.

Unfortunately, cats are especially vulnerable (moreso than dogs or most other pets) to vaccine-associated sarcomas, which are extremely aggressive tumors that occasionally develop at vaccine injection sites. Sarcoma risk is increased by the presence of adjuvants. Hence, for cats, I was under the impression that it's always safer to use modified live vaccines, which are adjuvant-free.

Granted, the risk of sarcomas developing even from adjuvanted vaccines is quite small. There are no solid numbers yet (the earliest study which attempts to address this issue won't be concluded until 2012, I believe), but from what I've been able to gather only 1 in 1000 or 1 in 2500 cats ever develop vaccine-associated sarcomas.

Still, I'm pretty sure the chance of reversion to virulence in a modified live vaccine is even smaller, so why take the risk with a killed vaccine?

More info here and on google:
http://catinfo.org/?link=vaccines
 

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The number of those odds dont look so great to me. If those were the numbers for vaccinating human children there would be a public outcry.

My vet uses the vetjet which is suppose to avoid sarcomas since its transdermal. I would expand your research to include the changing practise of vets not doing yearly vaccinations because of the risks and once a cat has initial rounds of vaccinations they have developed an immunity which doesnt need to be supplimented to be effective in fighting the diseases.

I personally dont vaccinate my cats anymore yearly. Ive seen way too many side effects and sarcomas. Even though i have foster cats and kiitenns arriving with health issues my cats remain healthy and uneffected.
 
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